Magic mushrooms key to muscling up—20 June 2017

A team of researchers led by Professor Fariba Dehghani, Director of the ARC Training Centre for the Australian Food Processing Industry in the 21st Century, believe that the humble mushroom could be the new key to refuelling after a workout. The Centre aims to boost Australia’s capacity to compete in the global market, particularly food products fortified with vitamins or minerals that provide health benefits for the prevention and treatment of chronic and acute diseases.  

Mushrooms are the only non-animal vitamin D source and contain bioactive compounds which display anti-tumour, immune system-regulating and stress-relieving properties. By taking advantage of the nutritional profile of the mushroom—as well as the large volume of mushroom waste produced by the food industry—the team of bioengineering researchers are working to produce a sustainable, balanced and nutrient-rich sports drink for the future.

The mushroom drink being developed by Professor Dehghani’s team will be low in carbohydrates and fat and balanced in its electrolyte, amino acid, fibre and vitamin content.  With 80 percent of mushrooms rejected in mainstream markets because of size and appearance—large-scale production of mushroom-based sports drinks could also help combat global food waste. 

 

Media issued by The University of Sydney.  

Image:Shiitake Mushrooms Stock Photo.
Image courtesy: KEKO64 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Original Published Date: 
Tuesday, June 20, 2017