Archive for year 2017  |  2016  |  2015  |  2014  |  2013   |  2012

2017












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Improving our rail network by understanding the process of “mud pumping”—30 January 2017

Distinguished Professor Buddhima Indraratna will be leading a research team at the University of Wollongong to determine underlying causes of a process known as ‘mud pumping’ which is highly destructive to railway lines. 

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Extracting more valuable minerals from low grade and waste ore deposits—30 January 2017

A research team led by Associate Professor Yongjun Peng at The University of Queensland will lead a project that aims to understand the reactions taking place on the most important waste mineral that interferes with the recovery of base-metal and precious minerals from ore deposits. 

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New project expands horizon of USQ space exploration—29 January 2017

ARC Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF) funding has enabled the University of Southern Queensland (USQ), in collaboration with The University of New South Wales and The University of Sydney, to start building a dedicated multi-telescope facility at Mount Kent Observatory on Queensland’s Darling Downs.

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Sci-fi holograms a step closer with ANU invention—24 January 2017

Funding support from the ARC has enabled ANU physicists to invent a tiny device that creates the highest quality holographic images ever achieved, opening the door to imaging technologies seen in science fiction movies such as Star Wars.

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New ‘smart needle’ to make brain surgery safer—20 January 2017

A new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer has been developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) at The University of Adelaide.

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Adopted babies can remember their birth language—19 January 2017

In a collaborative international study, involving the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language, researchers have discovered that early language learning in children adopted internationally can be subconsciously retained, even when they can no longer remember the learning experience. 

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Seeing the quantum future—14 January 2017

Researchers the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQUS), based at The University of Sydney, have demonstrated the ability to ‘see’ the future of quantum systems, and used that knowledge to pre-empt their demise. 

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High-sugar diets found to significantly reduce the lifespan of flies—11 January 2017

International research by University College London (UCL) with Monash University, with support from the ARC Future Fellowships scheme, has found that flies with a history of eating a high sugar diet live shorter lives—even after their diet improves.

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Sneak peek into the nanoworld of brain cells—8 January 2017

Researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ), with support from the Australian Research Council, are among the first in neuroscience to see the brain’s tiniest molecules in action and plot their movements

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Discovery of how healthy cereals can lower heart disease—7 January 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Plant Cell Walls, Professor Mike Gidley and lead researcher Dr Purnima Gunness, have identified a new mechanism for how healthy cereals such as oats reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood stream, thereby lowering the risk of heart disease. 

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Eco-driving and safe driving technology to save lives, environment and money—3 January 2017

Researchers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) have designed an in-car device that aims to persuade drivers to adopt a fuel efficient and safe driving style. The innovative in-vehicle technology will improve safety and save dollars at the petrol pump, and will soon be tested out on Brisbane drivers.


2016

 December







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Innovative Research teams get big ‘bench to business’ boost—20 December 2016

Five innovative research teams have received a boost under The University of Adelaide’s Commercial Accelerator Scheme, which has announced funding to take them all the way from ‘bench to business’.

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Prestigious international award recognises pioneering work of IMAS scientist—14 December 2016

Following on from his 2016 Australian Laureate Fellowship, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) scientist Professor Philip Boyd has been awarded the prestigious G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award by the US-based Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO).

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Rock art expert honoured with national award—13 December 2016

ARC Australian Laureate Fellow and Griffith University’s rock art expert, Professor Paul Taçon, has capped a remarkable year being honoured with the Rhys Jones Medal for Outstanding Contribution to Australian Archaeology.

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ANU invention to inspire new night-vision specs—7 December 2016

Australian National University (ANU) scientists have designed a nano crystal, around 500 times smaller than a human hair, that turns darkness into visible light and can be used to create light-weight night-vision glasses. This innovation was supported by the ARC, through the ARC Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS).

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 New telescope chip offers clear view of alien planets—6 December 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) are breaking new ground in photonics—the science of ‘electronics’ that uses light.

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New discovery at heart of healthy cereals—6 December 2016

A new discovery, funded through the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls, could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security—the access to balanced nourishment—globally.

November











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Potential new tool to aid breast cancer surgery30 November 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and collaborating institutions, have developed an optical fibre probe that distinguishes breast cancer tissue from normal tissue—potentially allowing surgeons to be much more precise when removing breast cancer.

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Vocational education and training research attracts strong interest—24 November 2016

The Australian Research Council, along with five industry partners, have provided support for a national research project, led by Federation University Australia researchers, on teachers and trainers in the vocational education and training (VET) sector.

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Daylight saving could save koalas—23 November 2016

An ARC-funded study, led by The University of Queensland, has found that adopting daylight saving time in South-East Queensland could help koala conservation.

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Cosmic ‘barcode’ from distant galaxy confirms Nature’s constancy—16 November 2016

Astronomers have precisely measured the strength of a fundamental force of Nature in a galaxy seen eight billion years in the past.

Researchers from Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Cambridge have confirmed that electromagnetism in a distant galaxy has the same strength as here on Earth.

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Dairy industry set to benefit from UQ research—16 November 2016

A project at The University of Queensland, funded by the ARC, is undertaking research aimed at early detection of infectious disease in dairy cows and could save Australian and New Zealand dairy industries millions of dollars.

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Breakthrough in genetics advances Brassica crop improvement—11 November 2016

Supported by Australian Research Council funding, an international team of researchers led by Professor David Edwards from The University of Western Australia, have made a major breakthrough in understanding the important crop plant Brassica oleracea.

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Melbourne’s 3D jet engine technology flies into production in France—8 November 2016

A Monash University-led research team—supported through ARC’s Industrial Transformation Research Hubs scheme—who 3D-printed a jet engine last year, has commenced a new venture for manufacturing aerospace components in France. Melbourne-based Amaero Engineering, a spin-out company from Monash University’s innovation cluster, has signed an agreement with Monash University and Safran Power Units to print turbojet components for Safran, a French-based global aerospace and defence company.

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Pre-fabrication manufacturing set to boost building industry—4 November 2016

A new centre based at The University of Melbourne will help unlock the potential growth of Australia’s prefabricated building industry by creating a co-operative training system between industry and universities.

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Tiny Einstein is created in super-cold microscopic detail—3 November 2016

As part of an ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems project, scientists from The University of Queensland have imprinted images of Einstein and Indian physicist Satyendra Nath Bose on a super-cold microscopic fluid to demonstrate a physics state first predicted by the famed pair in 1925.

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NDRI launches Lives of Substance—3 November 2016

Researchers at Curtin University’s National Drug Research Institute have recently launched an innovative new website—Livesofsubstance.org. Based on an ARC-funded project, Livesofsubstance.org is Australia’s first dedicated website presenting carefully researched personal stories of alcohol or other drug addiction, dependence or habit.

 

October











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Wheat from Wyalkatchem WA used to uncover building blocks for better grain—31 October 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at The University of Western Australia have catalogued the proteins found in the Wyalkatchem variety of bread wheat in an effort to better understand its biology and improve wheat production for the future.

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 Agbot the robotic weed slayer—21 October 2016

Agricultural robot Agbot II, designed and built by researchers at Queensland University of Technology’s ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotic Vision, could save Australia’s farm sector $1.3 billion a year by reducing the costs of weeding crops by around 90 per cent.

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New publication of individual tree health assessment from airborne Lidar and image spectroscopy using random-forest models—25 October 2016

 

Researchers at the Geospatial Analysis for Environmental change lab at The University of New South Wales, supported by ARC funding, have classified individual tree dieback levels using machine learning and field-measured tree crown dieback as indicators of tree health. Using airborne laser scan data to quantify individual eucalypt trees, the researchers developed novel algorithms to map the individual eucalypts. The work is important for applications such as biomass estimation, vegetation composition quantification and also for the derivation of individual tree health.

 

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Atomic-scale MRI holds promise for new drug discovery—12 October 2016

Researchers at The University of Melbourne have developed a way to radically miniaturise a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine using atomic-scale quantum computer technology.

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World-first study looks at removing the barriers to success for young refugees—10 October 2016

Supported by the ARC, researchers from the University of South Australia (UniSA) hope to fill an important gap in our understanding of how young refugees make the transition to further education and employment and develop the resilience to build successful lives post settlement.

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New device to power wearable technologies—10 October 2016

Wearable technologies, like those used to monitor movement during training or physiotherapy or even to power high-tech fashion accessories, are a step closer to reality following the demonstration of a flexible thermocell made from a solid state, cellulose-based electrolyte.

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World-leading aquaculture breakthrough to transform lobster production—8 October 2016

In a world-leading breakthrough for aquaculture, the ARC Research Hub for Commercial Development of Rock Lobster Culture Systems, based at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) in Hobart, have developed a unique aquaculture system that makes it possible to establish a new commercial industry for sustainable rock lobster production.

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New smart textile is the muscle behind next generation devices—7 October 2016

ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) researchers have, for the first time, developed a smart textile from carbon nanotube and spandex fibres that can both sense and move in response to a stimulus like a muscle or joint.

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Invasive insects cost the world billions per year—5 October 2016

Researchers from The University of Adelaide, in collaboration with French researchers, have compiled the first comprehensive and robust database of the global economic costs of invasive insects estimating that invasive (non-native) insects cost humanity tens of billions of dollars a year—and are likely to increase under climate change and growing international trade.

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Monash research discovery aids fight to reduce post-stroke infection deaths—4 October 2016

ARC-supported research, led by Dr Connie Wong (ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award recipient), has found that gut bacteria are the culprit in deadly post-stroke infections such as pneumonia, heralding a new approach to stroke patient management.

 

September










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Quantum research race lights up the world—29 September 2016

ARC-funded researchers, Associate Professor Igor Aharonovich (DECRA fellow) and Professor Milos Toth (Discovery Projects, lead investigator) and their colleagues at University of Technology, Sydney are working on engineering new ultra-bright and super-efficient sources from emerging 2D platforms.

 

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Wholly dooley, look what we’ve found—19 September

Researchers at The University of New South Wales, supported by ARC funding, have discovered a new species of extinct flesh-eating marsupial that terrorised Australia’s drying forests about five million years ago—identified from a fossil discovered in remote north-western Queensland

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Breakthrough in salt-tolerance in plants research—20 September 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at The University of Adelaide have made a breakthrough in investigating salt tolerance in plants, which could lead to new salt tolerant varieties of crops, and also answer unresolved questions in plant biology. 

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Creating efficiencies in earth moving20 September 2016

Discovery Early Career Researcher, Dr James Hambleton, from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Geotechnical Science and Engineering based at The University of Newcastle, is creating efficiencies in earth moving.

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Trailblazing engineer scoops international accolade from prestigious institution—19 September 2016

Monash University’s Professor Jean Armstrong, whose research is supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC), has received the Mountbatten Medal from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) for her outstanding contribution to the promotion of electronics and their application. 

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Research aims to show how plastic surgery will really look—14 September 2016

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, supported by ARC Linkage Project funding, have produced a new 3D imaging system that will provide patients considering facial cosmetic procedures with an accurate prediction of the results. The system will replace misleading and unreliable before and after 2D photographs that are currently being used by most health practitioners performing cosmetic work.

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Journey to the centre of the cell: nano-rods and worms wriggle best—13 September 2016

A new study by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging and the ARC Centre of Excellence in Bio-Nano Science based at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has answered a long-standing question that could lead to the design of better drug delivery vehicles: how nanoparticle shape affects the voyage through the cell.

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World’s most powerful X-ray takes a ‘sledgehammer’ to molecules—12 September 2016

An international team of more than 20 scientists, led by ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, have inadvertently discovered how to create a new type of crystal using light ten billion times brighter than the sun.

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Future heat-waves a threat to Australian plant life—12 September 2016

A global study by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology has found that future heat-waves could have devastating effects on Australia’s flora. Their study of heat tolerance in plants has found that across much of inland Australia, plant life is near tipping point in its ability to cope with rising temperatures. 

August




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Lab discovery a breakthrough for koalas infected with chlamydia—29 August 2016

Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney, with support from the Australian Research Council, have made a breakthrough in their urgent quest for a new drug to treat koalas at risk of infertility, blindness, pneumonia and even death caused by chlamydia.

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Quantum correlations do not imply instant causation—10 August 2016

Research by an international team from Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany, supported by ARC funding at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS), has shown that the gap between quantum phenomena and classical intuition is even bigger than previously thought. In 2015, the universe was officially shown to be weird when a series of experiments demonstrated that entangled quantum particles remain instantly connected, no matter how far apart they are, through what Einstein famously dismissed as “spooky action at a distance”. 

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Is this the end for bug spray?—30 August 2016

Murdoch University research, supported by ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award funding, is finding out how insects smell food. The study could lead to the next generation of environmentally-friendly insect attractants, repellents and pesticide technology. Insect biologist Dr Wei Xu explained that protecting crops against damage from insect pests and reducing the transmitted diseases and infections they can spread is an ongoing challenge.

July









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Brain Probe Developed to Examine Drug Dangers—21 July 2016

A new optical-fibre based probe has been developed at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), allowing localised temperature-changes deep inside the brain to be measured. The probe will help researchers to better understand the complex biochemical pathways in the brain, specifically in relation to drug use.

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How cells master the art of reading life's recipes—21 July 2016

A research project, supported by the Australian Research Council, led by the Australian National University (ANU) has closed an important gap in the understanding of a fundamental process of life—the creation of proteins based on recipes called RNA.

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Tiny gemstones used as enablers to advance imaging at the nanoscale—20 July 2016

A new study, conducted by the research team at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale (CNBP), has found minuscule diamonds and rubies could be the nanomaterials of choice for researchers aiming to explore cellular and molecular processes inside the living body.

Female birds call the shots in divorce—20 July 2016

Lead researcher and ARC Future Fellow, Associate Professor Anne Peters, is shedding new light on the causes of divorce in monogamous year-round territorial birds.  A Monash University study of the endangered Purple-crowned Fairy-wren has discovered the females are calling the shots when it comes to breaking up.

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ANU leads effort to develop drought-proof crops—19 July 2016

Supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, international research led by the Australian National University (ANU) has found how plants, such as rice and wheat, sense and respond to extreme drought stress, in a breakthrough that could lead to the development of next-generation drought-proof crops.

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Boom and bust water supplies in Southeast Australia—17 July 2016

 

Researchers at the Geospatial Analysis for Environmental change lab at The University of New South Wales have used more than a quarter-century of Landsat data to map the Murray-Darling Basin’s dramatically changing surface water. ARC Discovery Early Career researcher, Dr Mirela Tulbure, and colleagues, processed more than 25,000 Landsat images (covering a one million square kilometre area) to create their Surface Water Dynamic (SWD) data set, a comprehensive historical record of the basin’s surface water between 1986 and 2011.

 

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New project aims to help unlock the mystery of tick-borne disease—14 July 2016

Understanding why a growing number of Australians are diagnosed with a Lyme disease-like illness, presumed to be tick-borne, is the focus of a new highly innovative research project supported by the Australian Research Council.

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Soil increasingly at risk from household products—8 July 2016

Changing Australian soil conditions are exposing crops to silver nanoparticles, widely used in household products, an ARC-funded study led by The University of Queensland (UQ) has found. Dr Peter Kopittke from UQ’s School of Agriculture and Food Sciences said silver nanoparticles generally pose a low risk to agricultural food production, however testing in certain soil conditions led to an ‘unexpected’ finding. 

June 





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Tiny mirror improves microscope resolution for studying cells—17 June 2016

By growing cells on the mirrors and imaging them using super-resolution microscopy, a group of scientists from universities in Australia, China and the United States has addressed a problem that has long challenged scientists: seeing the structures of three dimensional cells with comparable resolution in each dimension. 

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Bright spots shine light on the future of coral reefs—16 June 2016

A study undertaken by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has appeared on the cover of Nature, following the discovery of bright spots in coral reefs.

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Black hole collision—more gravitational waves found—16 June 2016

Researchers including scientists from The Australian National University (ANU), supported by funding from the Australian Research Council, have detected gravitational waves for a second time, caused by the collision of two black holes 14 and eight times the size of the sun.

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New molecular design to get hydrogen-powered cars motoring—7 June 2016

A radical new process developed by researchers at The University of Melbourne, supported by ARC funding, allows hydrogen to be efficiently sourced from liquid formic acid, and could be one step forward in making the dream of hydrogen-powered cars an economic reality. 

May





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Plants are in touch with the world around them—24 May 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at the University of Western Australia have found that the simple act of water droplets landing on a leaf causes an elaborate response inside of plants. A similar reaction is seen when plants are patted or touched, suggesting that they are highly aware of what is happening to them.

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EQuS Chief Investigator named Australian Academy of Science Fellow—23 May 2016

ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum System researcher, Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop, has been named among the Australia Academy of Science Fellows for 2016.

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Gravitational Wave team shares in major physics prizes—4 May 2016

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU)—supported through funding from the Australian Research Council—who worked on the first detection of gravitational waves, are among the team that has won two prestigious physics prizes: the $3 millionSpecial Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics and the $500,000 Gruber Prize for Cosmology

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Well-travelled plankton could ride out warming oceans—3 May 2016

Research by the University of Technology Sydney, supported by ARC Discovery Projects funding, suggests that plankton have evolved to survive a wide range of conditions, thanks to their unexpectedly vast ocean travels.

 

 

April












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Fellowship supports study into stress—22 April 2016

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) has announced that Dr Michael Baratta, Senior Research Associate in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder, is the successful recipient of the CNBP-American Australian Association (AAA) Fellowship for 2016.

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 Nanomaterial to drive new generation of solar cells—19 April 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultra high Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) based at The Australian National University and the University of California Berkeley have discovered radical new properties in a nanomaterial that opens new possibilities for highly efficient thermophotovoltaic cells, which could one day harvest heat in the dark and turn it into electricity.

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 New  training and research hubs officially launched at UWA—18 April 2016

Two new $20 million hubs to be used for international research and training in offshore oil and gas have been officially launched at The University of Western Australia (UWA). The hubs are part of the Australian Research Council Industrial Transformation Research Program.

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Quantum researchers find noise isn’t always bad—15 April 2016

A team of researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have shown how noise can help transfer energy faster and more efficiently. Energy is transported by waves. 

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 New  ARC Training Centre for Gas Process Engineering—15 April 2016

A project to develop a breakthrough technique in nitrogen capture from natural gas (LNG) is just one project that will benefit from the ARC Training Centre for LNG Futures at The University of Western Australia as part of ARC’s Industrial Transformation Research Program.

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From IT to black holes: nano-control of light pioneers new paths—8 April 2016

 A research team at RMIT University has created a breakthrough chip for the nano-manipulation of light, paving the way for next gen optical technologies and enabling deeper understanding of black holes.

EQuS researcher receives Westpac Research Fellowship—6 April 2016

Early career researcher Dr Ivan Kassal from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems will receive funding to further his research in solar-energy harvesting using quantum effects, receiving aWestpac Bicentennial Foundation inaugural Westpac Research Fellowship. 

UOW and Boron Molecular driving manufacturing innovation6 April 2016

University of Wollongong (UOW) researcher, Dr Zhenguo Huang, an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) recipient (2012–2015), has developed new and improved chemical formulas that provide the recipe for key ingredients in advanced energy storage.

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ANU scientist named a Westpac research fellow—6 April 2016

ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher, Nanoscientist Dr Antonio Tricoli from The Australian National University (ANU), has won a prized Westpac Research Fellowship for his pioneering work on wearable technology that can help fight skin cancer and melanoma.

Chillin' with lasers: Using laser light to cool a quantum liquid—5 April 2016

Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems have, for the first time, used laser light to cool a special form of quantum liquid, called a superfluid. Lasers are widely used to cool gases and solid objects, but they have never before been applied to cool a quantum liquid. 

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Big data to help see small cells—1 April 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have successfully combined computer analysis with microscopy, to extract highly detailed cellular information that will help distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as cancer, injury and inflammation.

March













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Half a million dollar tick—29 March 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging at Monash University, together with the University of Oxford, have discovered how proteins present in tick saliva prevent the immune system from running amok.

Handheld surgical 'pen' prints human stem cells—24 March 2016

Australian researchers have used a handheld 3D printing pen to ‘draw’ human stem cells in freeform patterns with extremely high survival rates.

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Breakthrough technology to improve cyber security—22 March 2016

With enough computing effort, most contemporary security systems will be broken, but a research team at The University of Sydney has made a major breakthrough in generating single photons (light particles) as carriers of quantum information in security systems. 

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Scientist witnesses severe coral bleaching—21 March 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have described scenes of widespread damage as coral bleaching extends its reach in the northern Great Barrier Reef.

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World's thinnest lens to revolutionise cameras—11 March 2016

Researchers at The Australian National University, supported by ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher (DECRA) funding, have created the world's thinnest lens—one two-thousandth the thickness of a human hair—opening the door to flexible computer displays and a revolution in miniature cameras. 

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Students boost future job prospects in automated world—10 March 2016

In a new partnership involving Queensland University of Technology’s ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotics Vision, school students will be inspired to pursue careers in coding, computer science and robotics, and be assisted to be ready for the challenges of a future automated workforce.

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Revolutionary graphene filter could solve water crisis—10 March 2016


A new type of graphene-based filter could be the key to managing the global water crisis, according to research supported by the ARC.

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Forgotten film could reveal new insights into post-war Australia—9 March 2016

An ARC-funded Discovery Project co-led by a Murdoch University academic could reveal new insights into Australian life and culture from the 1940s to the 1980s.

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Shedding new light—9 March 2016

With funding from the ARC, the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy (MCEM) has commissioned a new piece of equipment providing Monash and other national and international researchers with a world-class tool to conduct their research. 

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Science: a fun career that can change women's lives—9 March 2016

More than 300 high school students attending a Women in Science symposium on International Women’s Day led by Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla from The University of New South Wales (UNSW), have been encouraged to pursue careers in STEM to shape a better world. 

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New way to control chemical reactions3 March 2016

A research team including The Australian National University, as part of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES), has harnessed static electricity to control chemical reactions for the first time, in a breakthrough that could bring cleaner industry and cheaper nanotechnology.

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Gene switch makes us look like our animal cousins—1 March 2016

An international team of biologists, led by researchers at The University of Western Australia supported by ARC funding, has discovered how the same genes are turned on in mammals, fish and amphibians early in embryonic development, making them look incredibly similar for a brief period of time. 

February









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Monash researchers developing wearable blood pressure monitor—29 February 2016

An ARC Future Fellow and his team have developed a new method for measuring blood pressure that may revolutionise the medical monitoring landscape.

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Host galaxy of mysterious bright burst identified—25 February 2016

An international team of scientists including the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) and CSIRO has identified for the first time the precise location of a very rare explosive event, called a fast radio burst (FRB), in a distant galaxy. Using a combination of radio and optical telescopes, they were able to conduct a unique census of the Universe’s electron count. 

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Faster, stronger, longer: accelerated evolutionary change in the cane toad—16 February 2006

Research undertaken by Australian Laureate Fellow, Professor Rick Shine, and his team at The University of Sydney,shows that the annual rate of progress of the cane toad invasion has increased five fold since their introduction into Queensland in 1935.

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Tiny red crystals that dramatically increase biogas production could reduce need for new coal seam wells—16 February 2016

Researchers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), supported by an ARC Linkage Projects grant and with industry partner, Biogas Energy, have discovered a way to produce a tenfold increase in the amount of methane gas emitted by naturally-occurring microbes living in coal seams and on food waste. 

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Gene technology to help healthy skin in Aboriginal Australians—13 February 2016

Researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, supported by ARC Linkage Project funding, have used cutting-edge genome technologies to reveal the genetic makeup of a widespread skin parasite causing serious health problems in Aboriginal communities

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 Stretchable nano-devices towards smart contact lenses—9 February 2016 

Researchers at RMIT University and The University of Adelaide, with funding support through the ARC’s Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities scheme, have joined forces to create a stretchable nano-scale device to manipulate light. 

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Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage—5 February 2016

A pioneering new study shows that the rate fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby. Professor Mark McCormick from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University was part of an international research team that found noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators. 

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Counting cancer-busting oxygen molecules—5 February 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have shown that nanoparticles, used in combination with X-rays, are a viable method for killing cancer cells deep within the living body. 

January










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New class of light wave discovered—29 January 2016

Physicists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), in collaboration with the University of Toronto and the University of York, have made a remarkable discovery that opens up future applications in many areas such as in precision laser surgery, imaging devices, and ultrafast computing and communication technology.

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Innovation in elder-care on the horizon—21 January 2016

Supported by an ARC grant Professor Ingrid Zukerman and her team are working on a non-intrusive home monitoring device, which sends out alerts to carers in the case of abnormally long periods of inactivity.

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Small but deadly: The chemical warfare of sea slugs—20 January 2016

New research, partly supported by ARC funding, has found that brightly coloured sea slugs are slurping deadly chemicals and stockpiling the most toxic compounds for use on their enemies.

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Hyper dots: The next breakthrough for bio-imaging, diagnostics, and nanomedicine—11 January 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale Biophotonics and the University of Technology, Sydney, have discovered new tools that could change how cancers and brain diseases, such as dementia and Parkinson’s disease are treated in the future.

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Research raises concerns about long-term use of chromium diet pills—11 January 2016

Concerns have been raised about the long-term use of nutritional supplements containing chromium, after researchers, supported by ARC funding, found the mineral is partially converted into a carcinogenic form when it enters cells. 

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How pigs are helping researchers tackle antibiotic resistance—8 January 2016

Research supported by ARC funding  at the University of Technology, Sydney, is tackling the growing health crisis of antibiotic resistance at its most significant source—the farmyard.

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Ancient gas cloud may be a relic from the death of first stars—8 January 2016

Researchers from Swinburne University of Technology (supported through the ARC Discovery Projects scheme) and the USA have discovered a distant, ancient cloud of gas that may contain the signature of the very first stars that formed in the Universe. 

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Amazing New Year’s Eve gift for fireball researchers—6 January 2016

Curtin University’s Desert Fireball Network team has successfully recovered a recently fallen meteorite from Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre in outback South Australia.

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New sensor to aid IVF—4 January 2016

Research from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) could enable the tricky process of monitoring early-stage embryos during the IVF process to become much easier. Researchers have developed a new fibre-optic sensor that can measure concurrently, hydrogen peroxide and pH (acidity-alkalinity concentrations) in solution.


2015

December











decorative

Scientists a step closer to turning plants into medicine factories—18 December 2015

Researchers from La Trobe University and The University of Queensland have taken an important step towards the holy grail of making cheaper and better medicines using plants rather than existing industrial processes.

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 Australian cities critical for threatened wildlife—16 December 2015

New research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) reveals that Australian cities still retain a remarkable number of threatened species.

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Bush up in the back paddock adds value to the farm—14 December 2015

New research from the University of Western Australia and the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has found native vegetation can add between 4% and 25% to the value of a rural property.

A focus on fatty eggs and fertility—10 December 2015

Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) into fat levels in oocytes (immature ova or eggs) has the potential to transform IVF practice, benefiting the dairy industry and also women seeking assisted reproductive treatment.

Young scientist becomes first Australian to receive photonics award—9 December 2015

An ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awardee is the first Australian researcher to be awarded the prestigious IEEE Photonics Society Young Investigator Award.

Telstra matches $10m CBA pledge for quantum computer race—8 December 2015

The University of New South Wales’s flagship quantum computing project at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology has received a second major injection of funds from Australia’s corporate sector, with Telstra matching a Commonwealth Bank pledge of $10 million support over the next five years

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Major shortfalls identified in marine conservation—3 December 2015

A new study by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has found that more than 17 000 marine species worldwide remain largely unprotected.

World failing to protect its migratory bird—3 December 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have called for a greater international collaborative effort to save the world’s migratory birds, many of which are at risk of extinction due to loss of habitat along their flight paths.

Deadly blessing?—2 December 2015

Researchers based at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging have solved the X-ray crystal structure of the lethal factor present in stonefish venom

Climate impacting on trees—1 December 2015

Climate change and extreme climatic events appear to be killing trees around the world. ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awardee, Dr Melanie Zeppel, from Macquarie University suggests these changes in climate are also reducing tree growth and health.

November









New agreement to open the door to next generation cell therapies—24 November 2015

Breakthrough technology uncovered by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), will be a part of a new collaboration between Macquarie University and clinical-stage regenerative medicine company Regeneus.

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‘Good’ mozzie virus might hold key to fighting human disease—18 November 2015

Researchers from The University of Queensland and The University of Sydney, with ARC Discovery Projects funding, have discovered a new virus carried by one of the country’s most common pest mosquitoes.

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Researchers uncover how some coral can survive annual bleaching events—18 November 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in collaboration with The University of Western Australia’s Oceans Institute and other research bodies, have found that coral with high levels of fat or other energy reserves can withstand the impact of annual coral bleaching events, compared to coral with lower levels of fat reserves.

 

Smart sensor detects single molecule in chemical compounds—16 November 2015

Australian and Italian researchers, assisted by ARC funding, have developed a smart sensor that can detect single molecules in chemical and biological compounds—a highly valued function in medicine, security and defence.

Decorative

 Laureate Fellow discusses research programme with European University Institute—11 November 2015

ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellow, Professor Anne Orford, was recently interviewed by the President of the European University Institute discussing her Laureate Fellowship in the area of Civil war, intervention and international law.

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Australian researchers take on G20 challenge to make energy efficient wheat—6 November 2015

A team of Australian researcher from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology will contribute to a G20 nations’ plan to strengthen future global food security by making more energy efficient wheat.

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USQ-led team cements ARC Discovery funding—6 November 2015

Receiving a boost through ARC funding, a project led by the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) will look at how to make fly ash produced by coal-fired power stations into ‘green’ cement.

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Scarlet fever making a comeback—4 November 2015

An international study lead by researchers from The University of Queensland, and supported by ARC funding, have tracked the re-emergence of a childhood disease which had largely disappeared over the past 100 years.


 

October












Cell colour in nose helps distinguish a genetic disease—30 October 2015

 Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have found that the colour of neuronal cells in the nose can be used to diagnose a rare genetic disorder called MELAS syndrome, which can result in stroke and dementia.

 Distressed damsels cry for help—29 October 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University have found that fish release a chemical ‘distress call’ when caught by predators, dramatically boosting their chances of survival.

Making heads and tails of embryo development: lessons from the humble fruit fly—28 October 2015

 

Long-standing question has now been answered by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging: how a growth factor in the fly embryo is controlled to determine where the head and tail form.

UNSW academics named as top Women of Influence—16 October 2015

Researchers at The University of New South Wales, Scientia Professors, ARC Future Fellow, Jane McAdam and ARC Australian Laureate Fellow, Veena Sahajwalla, have been named among Australia's 2015 Top 10 Women of Influence.

Echo-less light observed for first time—13 October 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) have been experimenting on creating special states of light that have no echoes.

Scientists pave way for diamonds to trace early cancer—12 October 2015

Physicists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems based at The University of Sydney, have devised a way to use diamonds to target tumours before they become life threatening.

Third UON Laureate Professor named NSW Scientist of the Year—7 October 2015

Eminent University of Newcastle (UON) geotechnical engineer, and ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor Scott Sloan, has been named the 2015 New South Wales' Scientist of the Year at the inaugural NSW Premier's Prizes for Science and Engineering.

Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing—6 October 2015

A team of Australian engineers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology has built a quantum logic gate in silicon for the first time.

Turning T Cell immunology on its head—5 October 2015

Challenging a universally accepted, longstanding consensus in the field of immunity requires hard evidence—and new research from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging has shown the proof is in the picture.

New technology enables people to take own blood samples at home—2 October 2015

ASTech, the ARC Training Centre for Portable Analytical Separation Technologies has developed a world-first device called the hemaPEN™ that allows people to collect an uncontaminated and precise volume of their own blood for testing at home.

Latest ARC grant to help save the northern quoll—1 October 2015

Saving the northern quoll from extinction is the focus of a new research project supported by the ARC. Dr Jonathan Webb, a wildlife ecologist from the University of Technology, Sydney, received a 2015 Linkage Projects grant of $337 775 for his project Preventing and Reversing Population Declines of Northern Quolls.

 

September





















‘Zero Hunger’ a global goal for Western Australian researcher—30 September 2015

Dr Laura Boykin, Research Fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology recently spoke to world leaders at the United Nations Headquarters in New York  about how her research will play a role in tackling the Global Goal of ‘zero hunger’.

Social media at bedtime linked to poor sleep and poor mental health for teens—29 September 2015

New ARC-funded research undertaken at Murdoch University—in collaboration with Griffith University—suggests teenagers with high social media use at bedtime suffer disturbed sleep, which in turn leads to depressed mood.

 

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Scientists propose polar protection plan—28 September 2015

International scientists, including researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED), have proposed a new pathway for saving the Arctic and Antarctic from environmental challenges.

Image of a Tasmanian devil being released into the wild. Image courtesy Simon de Salis at DPIPWE/Save the Tasmanian Devil Programme.

World first: trial of Tasmanian Devil vaccine begins in the wild—26 September 2015

Researchers from the University of Tasmania, supported by ARC funding, have released 19 immunised Tasmanian devils into Narawntapu National Park, marking an important point in the quest to save the devil from extinction.

Image of Professor Jolanda Jetten from The University of Queensland. Image courtesy The University of Queensland.

Jolanda buoyed by 'wonderful honour'—24 September 2015

ARC Future Fellow, Professor Jolanda Jetten from The University of Queensland, will be formally inducted into the Academy of Social Sciences (ASSA) in Australia in November for her research into social identity and group dynamics.

Ultrathin lens could revolutionise next-gen devices—23 September 2015

Researchers at Swinburne University of Technology in collaboration with Monash University and supported by ARC funding, have developed an ultrathin, flat, ultra-lightweight graphene oxide optical lens with unprecedented flexibility

 New Australia-China centre to foster astronomy—21 September 2015

Australia and China have established a new joint research centre in astronomy that will boost Antarctic astronomy and facilitate cooperation on future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array.

Cochlear STEMSmart UNSW Science 50 50 Event—21 September 2015

A new initiative, supported by the ARC, inspiring young women to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) has provided students with a ‘hands-on’ opportunity in STEM knowledge.

Invention: futuristic alloys three times stronger than steel—18 September 2015

ARC-funded materials scientists from the University of New South Wales have created an ‘instruction manual’ for developing metallic glass—an ultra-tough yet flexible alloy described as the most significant materials science innovation since plastic.

No Yolk! Colin Raston uncooks egg, wins Ig Nobel!!—18 September 2015

Professor Colin Raston, who made global headlines by unboiling an egg has been honoured with an Ig Nobel prize. This ARC-funded scientist and his team are transforming the field of medicine and more with their major scientific breakthrough.

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Wildlife friendly cities will make us happier and healthier—17 September 2015

It is well known that interaction with our local environment benefits our physical and mental health. A new paper from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) outlines four key ways to protect biodiversity in our cities and towns through managing urban sprawl, enhancing green space, preserving large trees and engaging the community.

Work of accomplished mid-career plant researcher recognised by the UWA Vice-Chancellor—15 September 2015

An ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology researcher has been awarded the 2015 University of Western Australia Vice-Chancellor's Mid-Career Research Award.  

Sea Cucumber in the Western Pacific

New study tackles conflicting goals in the Coral Triangle—15 September 2015

An international team including researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has used one of the world’s natural wonders—the Coral Triangle of Southeast Asia—to pioneer a new approach that conserves wildlife, protects people’s livelihoods and helps both adapt to climate.

Atomic Destruction: How smog affects the lungs—15 September 2015

We all know smog affects us but new research from the University of Melbourne has for the first time given us a glimpse as to what might happen when smog reacts with lung proteins.

Jamming with toddlers trumps hitting the books—15 September 2015

According to University of Queensland research, playing music with toddlers could benefit their development even more than shared reading. 

 

Researchers test speed of light with greater precision than before—14 September 2015

In research supported by the ARC, researchers from The University of Western Australia and Humboldt University of Berlin have completed testing that has effectively measured the spatial consistency of the speed of light with a precision ten times greater than ever before. 

ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology logo graphic image courtesy: Eyecue Design

Plant energy biology researchers dominant amongst authors of influential science—11 September 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology have featured heavily in a list of most cited authors released by The American Society of Plant Biologists.

Bones of Homo naledi. Image courtesy: National Geographic appearing in October 2015 issue of National Geographic magazine.

New species emerges from the dark zone—10 September 2015

ARC-funded research at James Cook University (JCU) has played a role in a discovery that may alter the known history of humankind.

 

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Research finds trees can be at risk if mining alters groundwater levels—8 September

ARC-funded research from Western Sydney University has found open-cut mines that modify groundwater levels can impact ecosystems outside official boundaries, raising questions about their full ecological effects.

 ARC CEED Chief Investigator takes out 2015 Women in Technology award—2 September 2015

Congratulations to ARC Future Fellow, Associate Professor Kerrie Wilson from The University of Queensland (UQ), awarded the 2015 Life Sciences Research Award at the Women in Technology awards, acknowledging the significant influence of her research on international conservation policy. 

August










 Image of Monash Universoty logo

Guiding the sustainable development of the Peel-Harvey—27 August 2015

In a new ARC Linkage project, a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by Murdoch University will be investigating how best to develop the Western Australian Peel region without unduly impacting the health of the iconic Peel-Harvey estuary.

grapes on a vine

Grape waste could make competitive biofuel—20 August 2015

The solid waste left over from wine-making could make a competitive biofuel, according to researchers from The University of Adelaide.

 

Damselfish

New research looks at how coral reef fish 'talk' to each other—19 August 2015

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, supported by ARC funding, have been studying the unique communication methods of young coral reef fish to learn more about how animals ‘talk’ to each other.

Anne Orphord and Aidan Byrne

Should foreign countries intervene in civil wars?—8 August 2015

The University of Melbourne’s Professor Anne Orford—awarded the ARC 2015 Kathleen Fitzpatrick Australian Laureate Fellowship—will use her $2.5 million research grant to explore the complex legal issues surrounding intervention by external actors in civil wars.

crop of corn

When is the price right for selling water?—7 August 2015

An ARC Future Fellow has provided new insights into how Australian farmers and irrigators may respond to certain market conditions, and when they are more likely to sell their water entitlements.

IPBES chooses young fellows from CEED—6 August 2015

Vanessa Adams and Sugeng Budiharta are two early-career conservation scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at The University of Queensland. 

Dr Chunle Xiong

Phones and computers a step closer to being more secure—6 August 2015

Physicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at The University of Sydney have developed a photonic chip that is able to communicate information more securely and is small enough to fit most computers.

Dr Martin Breed

Tall Poppy Awards—4 August 2015

Congratulations to ARC DECRA Fellow, Dr Martin Breed, for receiving a 2015 Tall Poppy Award. Dr Breed is developing conservation and restoration solutions from studying plant adaptation and community ecology.

ACES staff in the lab

Brain teaser: 3D-printed ‘tissue’ to help combat disease—3 August 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) based at the University of Wollongong have developed a 3D-printed layered structure, incorporating neural cells, that mimics the structure of brain tissue. 

July













Barley on a spoon

Researchers uncover key to barley domestication—31 July 2015

An international team of researchers, including the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls at The University of Adelaide, have unlocked the genetic key in barley that led to the start of cropping in human agriculture. 

leaf of a small plant

Stressed out plants send animal-like signals—29 July 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at The University of Adelaide have shown for the first time that—despite not having a nervous system—plants use signals normally associated with animals when they encounter stress.

fish swimming

Fishy sunscreen—28 July 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls are investigating an all new sunscreen made from fish slime, algae and crustacean shells.

Dr Caitlin Byrt in the lab

Tall Poppy for passionate plant scientist—28 July

Plant scientist and ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awardee, Dr Caitlyn Byrt, has been named a 2015 South Australian Tall Poppy.

Professor Ladislav Mucina

UWA project to tap into millions of years of plant history—23 July 2015

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, supported by an ARC Linkage project, will look at ‘plant communities’ that took millions of years to assemble, to try to understand the mechanisms allowing them to persist for such a long time. 

Blue light image

Shrimp’s ‘scary’ blue light helps scientists—23 July 2015

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, funded by an ARC Linkage project, have found that an enzyme squirted out of deep sea shrimp causing a bright blue burst to scare away predators is the key to innovative scientific work to develop new therapies for serious human diseases.

Family

Confidence keeps new parents strong21 July 2015

New research, supported by the ARC, at the University of Technology, Sydney, is identifying the most effective ways parenting services help families to build confidence and resilience through learning new skills.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Advance Molecular Imaging logo

Caught on camera: the first glimpse of powerful nanoparticles—17 July 2015

Researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence (CoE) for Advanced Molecular Imaging have announced an all-new and innovative hybrid method used to capture the 3D structures of nanocrystals.

Researcher Malachy Maher in the lab

Studying for a job that doesn’t exist…yet!—15 July 2015

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science is running a new PhD program for a future job that probably doesn’t exist yet, in a field that's set to take off.

Grapes

Making the most out of wine waste product—13 July 2015

Innovative new research at the ARC Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production aims to turn waste from the wine making process into a sustainable industry.

Dog

Optical ‘dog’s nose’ may hold key to breath analysis—7 July 2015

Researchers from The University of Adelaide, with support from the ARC, are developing a laser system for fast, non-invasive, onsite breath analysis, potentially enabling screening for a range of diseases including diabetes, infections and various cancers in the future.

mobile phone

Tablet technology to help children with autism—6 July 2015

Researchers at Monash University, funded through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, in collaboration with DreamWorks, have developed the world’s first tablet technology designed to assist children with developmental disabilities such as autism and Down Syndrome.

June










Dr Kathy Townsend

UQ projects win Healthy Waterways awards—23 June 2015

Researchers at The University of Queensland (UQ), funded through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, have highlighted the devastating impact of marine rubbish on wildlife, taking out the;2015 Healthy Waterways Research Award.

CEED Logo

Conservation research efforts recognised—23 June 2015

ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) researchers have won a prestigious Thomson Reuters Citation Award for their significant contribution to climate research.

Tomonori Hu

Australian scientists launch commercial enterprise in Europe—20 June 2015

The ARC Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) has launched a new commercial arm as part of a strategy employed by the centre to help contribute to a robust high tech industry in Australia.

Frog in the wild

Frog wars: survivors emerge in war with killer fungus—18 June 2015

Scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have found that some native frogs are winning their war against the world’s most devastating frog-killer—the chytrid fungus—while others are losing it.

Nemo fish swimming

Sediment makes it harder for baby Nemo to breathe easy—17 June 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have discovered that suspended sediment damages fish gills and can increase the rate of disease in fish.

Shark swimming

Shark deterrent research reveals interesting results—17 June 2015

Researchers from The University of Western Australia (UWA), supported by ARC funding, will continue their research into automatic shark detection and deterrents

researcher holding transparent, flexible sensors

Stretchy sensors can detect deadly gases and UV radiation—10 June 2015
RMIT University researchers, supported by ARC funding, have created wearable sensor patches that detect harmful UV radiation and dangerous, toxic gases such as hydrogen and nitrogen dioxide.

Great Barrier Reef Coral

Barrier Reef marine reserves combat coral disease—2 June 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef reduce the prevalence of coral diseases.

Dr Dhanisha Jhaveri in the lab

Research solves mystery of memory and mood—1 June 2015

Researchers at The University of Queensland (UQ), funded through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, are one step closer to understanding how the brain regulates memory and mood, thanks to the discovery of two distinct types of stem cells. 

May













 Rhonda Marriott

Indigenous researcher makes West Australian of the Year shortlist—28 May 2015

Aboriginal health researcher, Professor Rhonda Marriott from Murdoch University—funded by an ARC Discovery Indigenous grant—has been shortlisted as one of four finalists in the West Australian of the Year Aboriginal Award. 

smartphone

Use your smartphone for biosensing—26 May 2015

A research team from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) has shown that smartphones can be reconfigured as cost-effective, portable bioanalytical devices. 

ligo - machine

New era of astronomy as gravitational wave hunt begins—19 May 2015

Australian scientists, supported by the ARC, are in the hunt for the last missing piece of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, gravitational waves, as the Advanced LIGO Project in the United States comes on line. 

fishing boat

New way to save fish…and fishers!—18 May 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have found that well-enforced fishing areas can boost the incomes of fishers by up to 50 per cent through catching more fish, compared with those fishing in unregulated 'anything-goes' areas. 

Youtube still

Wellcome support for synthetic skin that instructs body how to repair itself—12 May 2015

ARC-supported research undertaken by The University of Sydney to develop a synthetic skin has received a $1 million Wellcome Trust Translation Fund Award.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science logo

Solution to corrosive ocean reveals our future climate—11 May 2015

World first research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science has explained the origin of an extremely corrosive ocean current that spread out from the Atlantic Ocean the last time global warming was seen as a result of carbon dioxide rises. 

drawing of brain

Nano memory cell can mimic the brain’s long-term memory—11 May 2015

Researchers at RMIT University, with support from an ARC Discovery Projects grant, have mimicked the way the human brain processes information.

Discussion session

Workshop sheds new light on Nanosafety—11 May 2015

During April 2015, the ARC Centre of Excellence on Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Techfwildnology at The University of South Australia (UniSA) held a workshop to explore the issue of ‘nanosafety’—the safe production and use of nanomaterials. 

Sun flower close up

Sunflower protein 'scissors' provide sunny news for medicine—8 May 2015

Researchers from The University of Western Australia and The University of Queensland have discovered an extraordinary protein-cutting enzyme that has also evolved to glue proteins together, a finding that may be valuable in the production of therapeutic drugs.

coral reef

‘Safe house’ discovery a new insight on reef ecology—7 May 2015

An international research collaboration including the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), supported by the ARC, has made a chance discovery that puts an entirely new perspective on the ecology of the microscopic plants that help drive coral reef formation. 

Koala

Celebrity species ‘can help save other wildlife’—6 May 2015

Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has revealed that charismatic or ‘celebrity’ endangered wildlife can help save less well-known or ‘forgotten’ animals—if the conservation funds are used wisely. 

Sandy Beach

Tropical marine ecosystems most at threat from human impact—1 May 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies have used the 23-million-year fossil record to calculate which marine animals and ecosystems are most at risk of extinction today. 

April















Philip Roe, Dr Steven Salisbury and Linda Pollard

Race to record dinosaur tracks—29 April 2015

University of Queensland palaeontologists, with the support of an ARC Discovery Project grant, are using the latest scientific technology to capture new information that will help bring a 130-million-year-old dinosaur landscape back to life. 

Professor Emily Hilder

Your smartphone transformed into a mobile lab—29 April 2015

The ARC Training Centre for Portable Analytical Separation Technologies (ASTech) is a new University of Tasmania collaboration that promises to bring the complexities of in-house laboratory testing to the fingertips of those in the field.

Professor John Sader

Joining forces to reveal the mass and shape of single molecules—27 April 2015

Research supported by the ARC at The University of Melbourne has developed a revolutionary new technology that can image and weigh single molecules, to instantly identify a single virus particle or protein. 

coral trout fish

Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef—22 April 2015

New research from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish population of the Great Barrier Reef. 

Professor Matt King

Further insights into Antarctic’s ice sheet collapse—21 April 2015

ARC Future Fellow and accomplished researcher, Professor Matt King from the University of Tasmania, has delivered the Royal Society of London’s 2015 Kavli Lecture on estimating the rate of loss of land ice from Antarctica—work for which he has also been awarded the prestigious 2015 Kavli Medal.

scientists in the lab

Cancer drug shows promise as cure for hepatitis B—21 April 2015

Australian scientists from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research have found a potential cure for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. 

Researcher in the field

Big surprises underground for plant scientists—20 April 2015

Researchsupported by the ARC and led by The University of Western Australia, in conjunction with the University of Montreal (USA) has revealed some amazing plant kingdom secrets in the kwongan eco-region of Western Australia’s south-west. 

Koala crossing sign next to road

How smart roads can help koalas beat traffic—20 April 2015

A new study by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) reveals that expanding existing highways, instead of building new roads, is the best way to minimise the impact of increasing traffic and growing cities, on koalas. 

divers on the ocean floor

Massive kelp forest experiment to beat habitat loss—20 April 2015

Research supported by the ARC has allowed scientists at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) to transplant hundreds of kelp plants to artificial patch reefs in an experiment to test the resilience and stability of the important common kelp on Tasmania's sheltered east coast. 

oranguan in a tree

Collaboration “cansave forests and $billions”—15 April 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have urged the three nations who share the Asian island of Borneo to collaborate more closely to save their endangered wildlife and meet development goals.

 Electron wave in a phosphorus atom

Breakthrough opens doors to affordable quantum computers13 April 2015

A team of researchers led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has encoded quantum information in silicon using simple electrical pulses for the first time, bringing affordable large-scale quantum computers one step closer to reality.

 Anglo-Australian telescope at Siding Spring Observatory

Archaeology of a million stars to unravel galaxies’ evolution—9 April 2015

Research led by The University of Sydney and The Australian National University, supported by the Australian Research Council, is using archaeology to solve one of the fundamental mysteries of astronomy.

 Last will and testament document

Older Australians are willing but younger ones delay—7 April 2015

Through an ARC Linkage Project, The University of Queensland has partnered with  other Australian universities and public trustees to conduct a national study on legal wills.

 David Harrich in the lab

Next step for proposed HIV gene therapy—2 April 2015

Researchers at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute—funded through an ARC Future Fellowship and the National Health and Medical Research Council—are about to commence pre-clinical trials of a genetic treatment to permanently suppress HIV (human immunodeficiency virus).

March






ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls logo

Barley research expected to help beer brew better—27 March 2015

A joint research initiative involving the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls and Carlton & United Breweries will investigate the impact of barley quality on key attributes of the brewing process and beer quality.

Professor Capasso

Inventor of Quantum Cascade Laser delivers only public talk at The University of Sydney—19 March 2015

Over 180 people filled the Charles Perkins Auditorium at The University of Sydney on 17 March to hear Harvard Professor Federico Capasso’s only major public talk in Australia.

Professor Len Collard in a field

Do you live in the place of spiders—18 March 2015

Want to know more about the Noongar origins of the name of your street, suburb or town? A new website developed by researchers at The University of Western Australia and Curtin University might help. The project, funded through the ARC Discovery Indigenous scheme, is called Boodjar—meaning country.

An artist’s impression of the electrode

Clean energy future: new cheap and efficient electrode for splitting water—18 March 2015

Scientists from The University of New South Wales (UNSW), including ARC Research Fellow Associate Professor Chuan Zhao, have developed a highly efficient oxygen-producing electrode for splitting water that has the potential to be scaled up for industrial production of the clean energy fuel, hydrogen.

CUDOS researchers

Breakthrough in nonlinear optic research—5 March 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) have developed a method to selectively enhance or inhibit optical nonlinearities in a chip-scale device.

February








Xinhua Wu with the 3D printed engine 

The world’s first printed jet engine—26 Feburary 2015

Researchers at the ARC Research Hub for Transforming Australia’s Manufacturing Industry through High Value Additive Manufacturing have printed a jet engine. 

Great barrier reef

Great Barrier Reef corals eat plastic—24 February 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that corals commonly found on the Great Barrier Reef will eat micro-plastic pollution.

Protein-laden coil wraps around the hydrogel channel

Spinal cord repair one step closer with discovery of the ‘go’ signal for nerve re-growth—11 February 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong, working in collaboration with the University of Texas, have found the ‘go’ signal that encourages nerve cell growth to repair nerve damage and spinal cord injuries in people.

Honey Bee

Why stressed young bees’ early start to foraging can lead to colony collapse—10 February 2015

An international team of scientists, including ARC Future Fellow, Dr Andrew Barron (Macquarie University), believe they may have worked out why bee colonies globally have been collapsing.

chalk drawing of greek letter “psi”

Quantum reality check—9 February 2015

Research supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems and Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at The University of Queensland has made major progress in answering a long-standing dilemma in quantum mechanics: Is Schrödinger’s cat really alive and dead at the same time?

animated carnivorous mushrooms

Carnivorous mushrooms reveal human immune trick—6 February 2015

Edible oyster mushrooms have an intriguing secret: they eat spiders and roundworms. 

 ARC Centre for Advanced Molecular Imaging logo

A titanic electron microscope that snap-freezes cells to reveal immune secrets—2 February 2015

A unique $5m electron microscope at Monash University will transform the way we view the human immune system, and advance Australian research towards better treatment for diseases from cancer and malaria to diabetes, rheumatism and multiple sclerosis.

January










baby

Babies' brains could unravel the mystery of stuttering—30 January 2014

University of Sydney researchers are launching a world-first study to see if it's possible to detect whether a baby will go on to stutter in later life—well before they start to talk.

wormhole in space

Black holes follow the rules—27 January 2015

Research at Swinburne University of Technology has shown that it is possible to predict the masses of black holes in galaxies for which it was previously thought not possible.

telescope beaming signal

Cosmic Radio burst caught red-handed—19 January 2015

In research supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) and using CSIRO’s 64-metre Parkes radio telescope in eastern Australia, Swinburne University of Technology PhD student Emily Petroff has for the first time seen a ‘fast radio burst’—a short, sharp flash of radio waves from an unknown source—happening live.

coral reef

Predicting coral reef futures under climate change—15 January 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies examining the impact of climate change on coral reefs have found a way to predict which reefs are likely to recover following bleaching episodes and which won’t. 

pile of soy beans

Research finds salt tolerance gene in soybean—8 January 2015

A collaborative research project between Australian and Chinese scientists, supported by the ARC, has shown how soybean can be bred to better tolerate soil salinity.

Dr Thomas Haselhorst and Professor Mark von Itzstein

Unveiling how rotavirus causes infection—6 January 2015

Researchers from Griffith University’s Institute for Glycomics and The University of Melbourne have significantly advanced understanding of a virus that kills up to half a million children each year.

Sugar glider hanging from tree

Scientists race to save ‘books’ in the burning ‘library of life—5 January 2015

As species blink into extinction all around the world, environmental scientists in Australia have come up with a way to decide ‘which of the books we rescue from the blazing library of life’.

lady smoking

Does bad behaviour run in the family?—5 January 2015

University of Queensland research aims to answer the age-old question of whether anti-social behaviour is passed down through families.

International year of light logo

Spectacular Sydney Fireworks mark the beginning of International Year of Light—2 January 2015

A giant lightbulb that illuminated the Sydney Harbour Bridge shortly after midnight on 1 January 2015, kicked off the International Year of Light (IYL) and Light-based technologies.


2014

December











Lauren Boykin walking in a field

TED Fellowship for Australian computational biologist—18 December 2014

Research Fellow Laura Boykin has been named as the only Australia-based TED Fellow for 2015

Miao Du onlaptop

New artificial intelligence technology for service virtualisation—18 December 2014

PhD student Miao Du has redefined service virtualisation technology resulting in the invention of a new process called opaque data processing.

James Warren headshot

Study of pearling trade to shed light on cultural histories of the material world—16 December 2014

The historical and cultural importance of the international pearling industry is the focus of a new study ARC-funded Discovery Project at Murdoch University.

crown fish

Snail scent scares pest starfish—15 December 2014

Scientists at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have found that the scent of a rare giant sea snail terrifies the crown-of-thorns starfish.

Dr Jenny Wang in the lab

Cancer stem cells could be easier to target following world-first discovery by Australian researchers—12 December 2014

Children’s Cancer Institute researchers have made a world-first in discovering new properties essential to drug-resistant tumour cells that could revolutionise cancer treatment and reduce the side-effects of chemotherapy.

Harleguin filefish

You are what you eat—if you’re a coral reef fish—10 December 2014

In a world first study researchers have found a coral-eating fish that disguises its smell to hide from predators.

distant galaxies

Astronomers see atomic hydrogen emission in galaxies at record breaking distances—3 December 2014

Using the world’s largest radio telescope, astronomers from Swinburne University of Technology have detected the faint signal emitted by atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies three billion light years from Earth, breaking the previous record distance by 500 million light years.

Michelle Simmons in the lab

Commonwealth Bank invests $5m in quantum computing—2 December 2014

The ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology(link is external), based at The University of New South Wales set to receive $5 million in funding from the Commonwealth Bank (CBA) to help researchers in their quest to build a silicon-based quantum computer.

Vijay Sivaraman holding phone

Wearable technology may bring health data to doctors—2 December 2014

Researchers at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) are working to produce new ‘wearable’ consumer devices that can monitor health and fitness, and possibly become an important source of information for medical practitioners and insurance providers.

the prosecution project logo

The Prosecution Project—1 December 2014

A new ARC-funded project digitising the registers of Supreme Court cases will help determine patterns of crime, prosecution and punishment over an extensive period of time (1850 to 1960).

November

 





Bionic bra

World-first ‘bionic bra’ inches closer to reality—27 November 2014

Work first started on the Bionic Bra more than fifteen years ago. However, technology is only starting to catch up with the researchers' imaginations. Professor Gordon Wallace, Executive Research Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science based at University of Wollongong, said the Bionic Bra team has recently discovered new actuators and sensing technologies that will bring the bra to life.

Researcher in the lab

Brain building with stem cells—24 November 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) are undertaking ‘disease modelling’ to build brain tissue with living human stem cells that will help us better understand, and ultimately treat, neural diseases like schizophrenia.

Professor Shari Forbes

Research facility will help solve murder investigations—18 November 2014

A unique, ARC-funded research facility will improve understanding of how human remains decompose and help police with missing persons and homicide investigations.

Invasive weeds in the Adelaide Hills

Plant library takes on the global weeds menace—12 November 2014

At-risk native plants worldwide have gained a new ally in their losing battle against aggressive and insidious feral weeds.

 

 

 October












koala climbing up a tree

Researchers celebrate koala chlamydia breakthrough—29 October 2014
Scientists at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) are celebrating the world's first successful field trial of a vaccine against chlamydia in koalas.

Clown Fish

Sediment impacts on fish larvae—23 October 2014
Sediments associated with dredging and flood plumes could have a significant impact on fish populations by extending the time required for the development of their larvae, according to Australian researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University.

X-29 airplane

1980s aircraft helps quantum technology take flight—20 October 2014
Over several years, a team of researchers at the ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems at The University of Sydney has taken inspiration from aerospace research and development programs to make unusually shaped experimental aircraft fly.

Epaulette shark

Sheltering habits help sharks cope with acid oceans—16 October 2014
Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University have found that the epaulette shark, a species that shelters within reefs and copes with low oxygen levels, is able to tolerate increased carbon dioxide in the water without any obvious physical impact.

Professor Veena Sahajwall and Paul Vielhauer

'Green steel' technology saves two million tyres from landfill—16 October 2014
'Green steel' technology invented at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has achieved a major milestone, with its use in Australia preventing more than two million waste rubber tyres from ending up in landfill.

colourful hands

Why don’t Aussies volunteer?—14 October 2014
The reasons why Aussies volunteer, and the benefits they bring to society, are well known.

drawing of an electron wave function

Australian teams set new records for silicon quantum computing—13 October 2014
Two research teams working in the same laboratories at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) have found distinct solutions to a critical challenge that has held back the realisation of super powerful quantum computers.

bilby in the dirt

Split reserves increase bilby’s survival chance—13 October 2014
Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has revealed that establishing entirely new fenced areas, rather than expanding existing ones, will provide better long term protection for highly vulnerable animals—such as the endangered bilby—against feral cats, dogs and foxes, diseases, or catastrophes such as fires and floods.

Dr Nicolas Talyor

Exploring Plant Metabolism and Adaptation to Environmental Extremes—10 October 2014
Read about the work being performed by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology's ARC Future Fellow Dr Nicolas Taylor in the October 2014 edition of International Innovation.

rock art in a cave

Rock art discovery paints new human history—9 October 2014 
Researchers from Griffith University have discovered cave paintings from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi are at least 40 thousand years old.

3D BioPrinting

New eBook launched - 3D BioPrinting: Printing Parts for Bodies—2 October 2014
A new eBook, 3D BioPrinting: Printing Parts for Bodies, released this week tells the story of the impending 3D printing revolution in medicine.

September













Murray Rowland

Bionic Vision Australia successfully completes clinical trial of implant in retinitis pigmentosa—30 September 2014
Bionic Vision Australia (BVA)—a consortium of researchers working together to develop bionic eye devices to restore a sense of vision to people with profound vision loss—has announced the successful completion of the first clinical trial of its prototype 24-channel percutaneous implant in patients with profound vision loss from the eye disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

Dr Barry Cayford in a sewer

Sewer technology brings global honour for UQ-led team—25 September 2014 
A University of Queensland-led research team that is radically improving sewer design and management has won a prestigious international prize in Portugal.

Professor Khin Zaw

Researchers unlock the mineral riches of SE Asia—22 September 2014
Research being carried out at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES) at the University of Tasmania is helping mining companies pinpoint mineral-rich ore deposits in previously unexplored areas of South East Asia.

mantis shrimp

Elegant and efficient vision systems can detect cancer—22 September 2014
Mantis shrimp eyes are inspiring the design of new cameras that can detect a variety of cancers and visualise brain activity.

Clown fish

Nemo's Epic Journey to Find a New Home—19 September 2014 
New research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral COE) at James Cook University has found clownfish larvae can swim up to 400 kilometres in search of a home, which makes them better able to cope with environmental change.

Museum Victoria's 100,000 object data browser

iCinema leads development of mARChive with Museum Victoria—19 September 2014
The icinema Centre for Interactive Cinema Research at The University of New South Wales has developed an interactive digital browser that is essentially a giant cinema allowing visitors to browse through rarely seen collections.

Professor Mark Kendall

Nanopatch to help WHO battle polio—17 September 2014
The World Health Organisation's (WHO) battle against polio has a new weapon with agreed research collaborations with Vaxxas, the biotechnology company responsible for developing the 'Nanopatch', a revolutionary vaccine delivery method.

person scuba diving

Eureka! Reef Life team wins major science prize—11 September 2014
A University of Tasmania (UTAS) team, supported by funding through the ARC, has been awarded the 2014 Eureka Prize for Environmental Research.

universe

Three eyes on the sky track laws of Nature 10 billion years ago—10 September 2014
An international team of astronomers, led by researchers from Swinburne University of Technology, have focused the three most powerful optical telescopes in the world on a single point in the sky to test one of Nature's fundamental laws.

3D-printed fibre-reinforced hydrogel

Toughening up hydrogels for 3D printed cartilage—9 September 2014
A researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) based at the University of Wollongong has developed a way to 3D-print tough, fibre-reinforced hydrogels that mimic the strength and suppleness of human cartilage.

wine in wine wrack

Aussies' take on alcohol warning labels—5 September 2014
A team of Australian researchers led by Flinders University's Dr Emma Miller are now asking consumers how they would react if their favourite bottle of bubbly or brand of beer was emblazoned with the glaring warning: Alcohol causes cancer!

plant in an office

Leafy-green better than lean—1 September 2014
An office enriched with plants makes staff happier and boosts productivity by 15%, a University of Queensland (UQ) researcher has found.

August








Swinburn University of Technology logo

Policy Online Wins 2014 Australia and New Zealand Internet Awards—28 August 2014
Policy Online, based at Swinburne University of Technology, has won the Information category in the 2014 Australian and New Zealand Internet Awards(link is external) (ANZIA).

fish swimming

Gene genies to combat invasive pest fish species—27 August 2014
The University of Tasmania will lead a collaborative effort to rid waterways around Australia of the Eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), introduced 100 years ago to combat malaria.

Dr Julianne O'Reilly-Wapstra

Pine plantation puzzle puts researchers on wallaby trail—27 August 2014 
Research by the University of Tasmania has found that some of Tasmania's wallabies have developed a taste for plantation pine, and they are causing significant damage to growing plants in some places. 

Associate Professor Andrea Morello

The Quantum around You—26 August 2014
Associate Professor Andrea Morello from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at The University of New South Wales stars in a new YouTube series about quantum phenomena.

bunch of grapes

Vines, Wine and Identity—25 August 2014
Australians are shifting from beer to wine, and now a University of Newcastle project is set to provide critical insight into what role the Hunter Valley has played in influencing this change.

Professor Matthew Nelson in a field

Canola flowers faster with heat genes—21 August 2014
A problem that has puzzled canola breeders for years has been solved by researchers from The University of Western Australia (UWA)—and the results could provide a vital breakthrough in understanding the impact of increasing global temperatures on crop flowering.

Researchers Negar Zanjani and Dr Peter Valtchev in the lab

Seabed solution for cold sores—20 August 2014
The blue blood of abalone, a seabed delicacy could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus following breakthrough research at The University of Sydney.

July

 Sad and depressed boy in corner Image: Sad and depressed boy in corner
Image credit: RobertHoetink
Image courtesy: iStock - 29528052

Breaking the cycle of disadvantage 
Media issued by the University of Queensland
31 July 2014

A new ARC Centre of Excellence based at The University of Queensland (UQ) is tackling the problem of deep and persistent disadvantage among children and families in Australia. The ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course (Life Course Centre) will be led by Professor Janeen Baxter from UQ's Institute for Social Science Research and will include leading Australian and international researchers from the Universities of Western Australia, Melbourne and Sydney as well as international experts from Harvard, Chicago, Singapore and Essex.

 

 

 launch of the new ACESImage: ARC CEO Professor Aidan Byrne, UOW Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Judy Raper, Senator the Hon Concetta Fierravanti-Wells, UOW Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul Wellings and ACES Director Professor Gordon Wallace at the launch of the new ACES. 
Image courtesy: ACES

Funding to take discoveries to new dimensions 
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES)
31 July 2014

A new ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) with $25 million in Federal Government funding will see the University of Wollongong heading up an international materials research effort. ACES, which now brings together six Australian and five international partners, will embark on an ambitious program that will take materials science research, training, commercialisation and engagement programs into new dimensions through to 2020. ACES Director Professor Gordon Wallace said ACES will build on its internationally recognised fundamental research program to fast track the development of new industries and manufacturing opportunities around the next generation of batteries, solar cells and medical implants.

 

 Associate Professor Scott Croom

Image: Associate Professor Scott Croom (CAASTRO/University of Sydney) with the SAMI instrument during its construction. 
Photo credit: Tim Wheeler

Australian researchers pioneer a 'Google street view' of galaxies 
Media issued by The University of Sydney
23 July 2014

A new home-grown instrument based on bundles of optical fibres is giving Australian astronomers the first 'Google street view' of the cosmos—incredibly detailed views of huge numbers of galaxies. Developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) at the University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory, the optical-fibre bundles can sample the light from up to 60 parts of a galaxy, for a dozen galaxies at a time. By analysing the light's spectrum, astronomers can learn how gas and stars move within each galaxy, where the young stars are forming and where the old stars live. This will allow them to better understand how galaxies change over time and what drives that change. "It's a giant step," said Dr James Allen of CAASTRO. "Before, we could study one galaxy at a time in detail, or lots of galaxies at once but in much less detail. Now we have both the numbers and the detail."

 

 

 

  Stream Of Blood Cells

Image: Stream Of Blood Cells
Image credit: tigger11th.
Image courtesy: Image courtesy of tigger11th / FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

The fight against malaria 
Media issued by Monash University
17 July 2014

State-of-the-art military hardware could soon fight malaria, one of the most deadly diseases on the planet. Researchers at Monash University and the University of Melbourne have used an anti-tank Javelin missile detector, more commonly used in warfare to detect the enemy, in a new test to rapidly identify malaria parasites in blood. Scientists say the novel idea could set a new gold standard for malaria testing. Researchers used a special imaging detector known as a Focal Plane Array (FPA) to detect malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. Originally developed for Javelin anti-tank heat seeking missiles, the FPA gives highly detailed information on a sample area in minutes. The heat-seeking detector, which is coupled to an infrared imaging microscope, allowed the team to detect the earliest stages of the malaria parasite in a single red blood cell. Lead researcher and ARC Future Fellow, Associate Professor Bayden Wood said that a test that can catch malaria at its early stages is critical to reduce mortality and prevent the overuse of antimalarial drugs.

 

 

orangutan

Image: Orangutan
Image credit: Kabir Bakie
Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Scientists urge greater efforts to protect orangutan forests 
Media issued by the ARC Centre of  Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED)
17 July 2014

Scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at the University of Queensland have established the best strategies for maintaining orangutan populations for more than 20 years on a limited budget. Researchers analysed which strategy or combination of strategies, and under what conditions, is the most cost‐effective at maintaining wild orangutan populations. "Money is limited in conservation, and it is important to know how best to spend it," said Dr Howard Wilson of CEED. "We found that the choice between habitat protection and rehabilitation depends on the cost of rehabilitation per orangutan and the rate of deforestation. If we want to maintain orangutan populations for less than 20 years, then reintroduction is best. But if we're aiming for long‐term species conservation, protecting their habitat is by far the best strategy."

 

 

 Atoms Apart by Anna Madeleine

Image: Atoms Apart by Anna Madeleine.
Image courtesy of the artist.

Insight Radical works return to London 
Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology
14 July 2014

Insight Radical artworks from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology have returned to London for an exhibition in July. The exhibition Art in Chemistry, Chemistry in Art will be held from 14–27 July 2014 at the Royal Society of Chemistry in London. Insight Radical was a Centre-led project involving artist residencies in the Centre's Melbourne laboratories during 2012, and exhibitions of works produced in response to these residencies in London, Sydney and Adelaide throughout 2013–2014. The project was supported by the Australian government through Inspiring Australia, Winsor & Newton, and Artist Profile.

 

 The giant gavel of justice at the Ohio Judicial Center

Image: The giant gavel of justice at the Ohio Judicial Center in downtown Columbus, Ohio
Image credit: Sam Howzit
Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons via Flickr 

Reducing incarceration using Justice Reinvestment: an exploratory case study 
Media issued by The Australian National University

7 July 2014

An ARC Discovery Indigenous research project led by the National Centre for Indigenous Studies (NCIS) at The Australian National University is researching the theory and methodology of Justice Reinvestment (JR). JR is a rethinking of the criminal justice system, whereby taxpayer funds are 'reinvested' into the community instead of being spent on imprisoning people for low-level criminal activity. JR retains detention as a measure of last resort. At a broad level, JR requires a shift in policy and social outlook from incarceration to non-incarceration, to reinvest the large sums of taxpayer money currently being spent in imprisoning people, back into the community. The project, using the NSW town of Cowra for the case study, will explore the conditions, governance and cultural appropriateness of re-investing resources otherwise spent on incarceration into services that enhance the ability of juvenile offenders to remain in their community—to reduce further criminal behaviours and health costs associated with incarceration.The research could potentially result in recommendations that will address the levels of young people (whether Indigenous or non-Indigenous) coming into contact with the criminal justice system.

 

 

 ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging

Image: Some members of the research team with the Crystalmation robot (which they use to make the protein crystals) at the Monash Macromolecular Crystallisation Facility (MMCF). L to R Dr Richard Berry, Dr Dene Littler, Mr Gautham Balaji (research assistant) and Mr Felix Deuss (PhD student)
Image credit: ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging

How viruses use 'fake' proteins to hide  in our cells 
Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging
 4 July 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging—at Monash and Melbourne Universities—have determined the basic structure of one of the two known families of the deceptive proteins. Some viruses can hide in our bodies for decades. They make 'fake' human proteins that trick our immune cells into thinking 'everything is awesome' and there is nothing to see. Using synchrotron light and working with a common virus that lives in people happily and for the most part harmlessly, they worked out the structure of the fake proteins. This is an important first step towards producing better vaccines and drugs to fight viral disease. The research was posted online this week by the Journal of Biological Chemistry. "Our work highlights how these viruses mimic the immune system in order to evade it," says Monash University's Dr Richard Berry, a senior author of the paper.

 

 

 Wheat

Image: Wheat
Image credit: Bluemoose
Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Boron tolerance discovery for higher wheat yields 
Media issued by the University of Adelaide
3 July 2014

University of Adelaide scientists have identified the genes in wheat that control tolerance to a significant yield-limiting soil condition found around the globe—boron toxicity. The identification of boron tolerance genes in wheat DNA is expected to help plant breeders more rapidly advance new varieties for increased wheat yields to help feed the growing world population. The researchers from the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) say that in soils where boron toxicity is reducing yields, genetic improvement of crops is the only effective strategy to address the problem. "About 35% of the world's seven billion people depend on wheat for survival," says project leader Dr Tim Sutton. "However productivity is limited by many factors such as drought, salinity and subsoil constraints including boron toxicity. Our identification of the genes and their variants responsible for this adaptation to boron toxicity means that we now have molecular markers that can be used in breeding programs to select lines for boron tolerance with 100% accuracy." The ACPFG receives support from the ARC as a co-funded centre.

 

 Pre-teen girl being bullied by a group of mean girls

Image: Pre-teen girl being bullied by a group of mean girls
Image credit: Figure8Photos

Families can play key role against bullying
Media issued by The University of Queensland
1 July 2014

Research at The University of Queensland, supported by the ARC, has shown that families can be more effective in protecting children from bullying than school-based strategies alone.

The findings, to be published in the journal Behaviour Therapy show that parents can actively help their children reduce the impact of bullying.

The results of a randomised control trial of Resilience Triple P, show the program is more effective than efforts of school staff to address concerns about a particular child.

Resilience Triple P is a program for the families of children who are experiencing bullying by other children at school. The program was developed to help children and their parents make a positive difference to their child's situation.

Study author Karyn Healy said families who participated in the program reported that their children were bullied less and were much less emotionally distressed after the program.

 

 

May

 Barley and wheat growing at the saline GM field trial site at Corrigin

Image: Barley and wheat growing at the saline GM field trial site at Corrigin, WA.
Image courtesy: ACPFG

Technology for salty soils
Media issued by the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG)
16  May 2014

A new partnership between the University of Connecticut and the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) is improving the ability of cereal crops to grow in saline conditions. Soil salinity is a major issue for grain growers worldwide. In the United States it is estimated that yield reductions occur due to salinity on approximately 30 per cent of arable land, and in Australia, 67 per cent of all grain growing areas are affected by this environmental stress. The technology known as vacuolar pyrophosphates (AVP1) was developed at the University of Connecticut, and has now been licenced by the ACPFG and is showing positive signs in cereal crops grown at ACPFG's saline field trials. The ACPFG is jointly funded by the ARC and the Grains Research and Development Corporation.

 

CUDOS's Dr Darren Hudson speaks at the showcase.

Image:CUDOS's Dr Darren Hudson speaks to ARC Executive Director, Professor Brian Yates, during the showcase.
Image credit: Linnet Foto
Image courtesy: CUDOS

CUDOS research shines at showcase
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS)
15 May 2014

The ARC Centre of Excellence in Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems recently held a Photonics Showcase at the Australian Technology Park in Sydney to celebrate the many innovations in photonics that find industrial application from research. The aim of the showcase is to build links between researchers and those seeking the next industrial opportunity, and to provide educational resources to the teachers of the next generation of scientists, engineers, and users of photonics technology. CUDOS researchers exhibited a number of 'industry-ready' prototypes of their research including a quantum-based generator of random numbers, a laser source of mid-infrared light for sensing, a 3D nano-printer and photonic filters for applications from seeing through haze to descrambling microwave signals. You can read more about the showcase and the work of CUDOS in its showcase report now on the CUDOS website.

 

CCD stakeholders

Image: CCD stakeholders gather at their recent workshop in the Australian Hearing Hub. Photo credit: Effy Alexakis.
Image courtesy: Macquarie University

Workshop explores the future of cognitive science research
Media issued by Macquarie University
13 May 2014

Leaders from community organisations working in the areas of autism, learning difficulties, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, speech pathology and more, recently met with researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) to share their common vision and shape future research directions. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for CCD researchers to learn more about the practical needs of children and adults with cognitive health issues, and for community and industry leaders to discuss the potential impact of evidence-based research findings and treatment protocols for meeting the needs of the people they serve. CCD Director, Professor Stephen Crain, said the day enabled the Centre to "showcase some of the ways in which experimentation and technology can lead to future impacts, based on the methods of cognitive science".

 

 Graphene oxide non-linear film

Image:  Image courtesy: Swinburne University of Technology

Graphene photonics breakthrough promises fast-speed, low-cost communications
Media issued by Swinburne University of Technology
9 May 2014

Researchers have developed a high-quality continuous graphene oxide thin film that shows potential for ultrafast telecommunications. A team from Swinburne University of Technology's Centre for Micro-Photonics have created a micrometre-thin film with record-breaking optical nonlinearity—this makes the film suitable for high performance integrated photonic devices used in all-optical communications, biomedicine and photonic computing. "Such a laser patternable highly nonlinear thin film, about one hundredth of a human hair, has not been achieved by any other material," project leader Associate Professor Baohua Jia said. This project is funded through the ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award scheme.

 

 

 cows in fieldImage courtesy: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Getting to the meat of animal welfare issues
Media issued by The University of Adelaide
7 May 2014

What are Australian consumers' key concerns about how livestock are treated, and how much are they willing to pay for 'ethically produced' meats? How will consumer values influence livestock industry and food retailer decisions, and ultimately impact what is available on supermarket shelves in the future?

These and other social and economic issues are the focus of a new ARC funded three-year research project now underway at the University of Adelaide in partnership with industry leaders, retailers and government.

 

  NCGRT  logo

Image courtesy: National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training

National  Water Bank proposed
Media issue by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT)
7 May 2014

A leading water scientist has proposed the development of a National Water Bank—a continent-wide replenishment scheme for underground reserves of fresh water—to help safeguard the nation from water scarcities for centuries to come.

The creation of a National Water Bank could do much to help Australia avoid future water shortages, according to Professor Craig Simmons, NCGRT Director.

The NCGRT is jointly funded by the ARC and the National Water Commission.

 

 

 

Radio wave emission from a pulsar

Image: Radio wave emission from a pulsar 
Image courtesy: Swinburne Astronomy Productions/CAASTRO

Galactic lens yields precision pulsar measurement
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO)
6 May 2014

An international team of astronomers, including scientists from the ARC Centre of a Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), have made a measurement of a distant neutron star that is one million times more precise than the previous world's best.

The researchers were able to use the interstellar medium, the 'empty' space between stars and galaxies that is made up of sparsely spread charged particles, as a giant lens to magnify and look closely at the radio wave emission from a small rotating neutron star.

CAASTRO is funded under the Australian Research Council Centres of Excellence scheme.

 

UNSW spelt out using an ionic liquid

Image: Salt on a chip—UNSW spelt out using an ionic liquid printed onto a gold surface about 1cm across.
Image credit: Dr Chuan Zhao

New lab-on-a-chip device overcomes miniaturisation problems
Media issued  by The University of New South Wales (UNSW)
1 May 2014

UNSW chemists, supported by an ARC Discovery Projects grant, have invented a new type of tiny lab-on-a-chip device that could have a diverse range of applications, including to detect toxic gases, fabricate integrated circuits and screen biological molecules.

The novel technique developed by the team involves printing a pattern of miniscule droplets of a special solvent onto a gold-coated or glass surface.

The research was carried out by Dr Zhao, Christian Gunawan and Mengchen Ge from the UNSW School of Chemistry.

 

 

Bauxity Residue sampling

Image: Bauxity Residue sampling Photographer: Mark Dobrowolski 
Image courtesy: The University of Western Australia

Breaking new ground on restoring healthy soil
Media issued by The University of Western Australia
1 May 2014

Through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, researchers from The University of Western Australia, working with Alcoa of Australia, are breaking new ground on finding ways to transform bauxite residue into healthy soils.

Rehabilitating bauxite residue is challenging because it's typically highly alkaline and saline, and contains very little organic matter, nutrients or microorganisms, all of which are vital ingredients for plants to grow.

The research team led by Dr Natasha Banning found that adding a combination of green waste compost and fertiliser to the bauxite residue sand improves its rehabilitation potential and its capacity to support plants.

 

  

April

 Goniastrea aspera releasing egg sperm bundles

Image: Goniastrea aspera releasing egg sperm bundles.
Image credit: Andrew Baird

More coral babies staying at home on future reefs
Media issued by The ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies
29 April 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University, have found that increasing ocean temperatures due to climate change will soon see reefs retaining and nurturing more of their own coral larvae, leaving large reef systems less interconnected and potentially more vulnerable.

"We found that at higher temperatures more coral larvae will tend to stay on their birth reef," says the lead author of the study published today, Dr Joana Figueiredo.

Professor Sean Connolly, also from the Coral CoE, explains that while more coral larvae will stay close to their parents, fewer will disperse longer distances, leaving reefs less connected.

 

 

 quantum

Image: Xanthe Croot and James Colless uncovered a way to study what happens when electrons in quantum dots interact with sound waves of the solid they are trapped in.
Image courtesy: The ARC Centre of Excellence in Engineered Quantum Systems Image credit: Professor David Reilly, The University of Sydney

Probing the sound of a quantum dot
Media issued by The University of Sydney
24 April 2014

Physicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) and The University of Sydney's School of Physics have discovered a method of using microwaves to probe the sounds of a quantum dot—a promising platform for building a quantum computer.

PhD candidates, James Colless and Xanthe Croot,  uncovered a way to study what happens when electrons in quantum dots interact with sound waves of the solid they are trapped in.

 

 

Prof Simmons

Image: A "pioneer" in her field, Professor Simmons has built a formidable research team at UNSW. 
Image Courtesy: UNSW Australia

Pioneer physicist joins elite academy 
Media issued by UNSW

24 April 2014

Congratulations to ARC Laureate fellow and Scientia Professor of Physics, Michelle Simmons, who has been elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Simmons is Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at The University of New South Wales.

There are currently only ten Australian Foreign Honorary Members of the Academy.

ARC CEO Professor Aidan Byrne has commended Professor Simmons on this prestigious election.

"This election acknowledges Professor Simmons's outstanding contribution to Australian knowledge and innovation, particularly through her ongoing leadership, teaching and world-first research breakthroughs with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology."

 

 T cell receptor

Image: T-cell receptor (space filling, on top) binds to the DQ2 molecule (ribbon and mesh).
Image courtesy: ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging

The molecular heart of celiac disease revealed
Media issued by Science in Public
24 April 2014

Researchers at the new ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaginghave discovered how immune cells bind to wheat proteins that trigger celiac disease. They have described the molecular basis of how most of the immune cells (T cells) that induce celiac disease lock onto gliadin, a component of gluten, thereby triggering inflammation of the lining of the small intestine. This is what gives many celiac sufferers symptoms similar to food poisoning after eating a slice of toast. The work opens the way to potential treatments and diagnostics.

 

UNSW Bionic ear

Image courtesy: The University of New South Wales

Bionic ear technology used for gene therapy
Media issued by The  University of New South Wales (UNSW)
24 April 2014

Researchers at the UNSW  have for the first time used electrical pulses delivered from a cochlear implant to deliver gene therapy, thereby successfully regrowing auditory nerves.

The research was supported by an ARC Linkage Project grant and the project also has the support of Cochlear Limited.

This research also heralds a possible new way of treating a range of neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease, and psychiatric conditions such as depression through this novel way of delivering gene therapy.

 

  

Fish swimming amongst carbon dioxide bubbles

Image: Fish swimming amongst carbon dioxide bubbles off the coast of PNG.
Image courtesy: Alistair Cheal

Fish respond adversely to ocean acidification
Media issued by The ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies
14 April 2014

In a world-first study published today, researchers have found that fish in the wild respond adversely to ocean acidification.

“Fish living at natural carbon dioxide seeps have abnormal behaviours similar to what we’ve observed in previous laboratory experiments,” says the lead author of the study, Professor Philip Munday from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. He adds that the carbon dioxide levels at the seeps are similar to what is predicted for the oceans in the second half of this century.

 

 

 ncgrt logo

 Image: NCGRT logo

Bailing out the world's fresh water bank
Media issued by The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
14 April 2014

An Australian-based water scientist is testing a new technology to help save imperilled underground water resources in Australia and around the world as climate change tightens its grip on the global food supply.

Dr Margaret Shanafield of the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training at Flinders University has developed a ground-breaking way to measure how much water is stored underground when big rivers are allowed to flood. 

 

 
Thousands of stories in more than 25 Indigenous languages are being digitised

Image: Thousands of stories in more than 25 Indigenous languages are being digitised.
Image courtesy: Charles Darwin University

Unique archive of Indigenous stories opens to the world
Media Issued by Charles Darwin University
7 April 2014

A living archive that is breathing life back into thousands of Indigenous language books created decades ago was launched at Charles Darwin University (CDU) on 7 April.

The archive is an ARC-funded project which aims to preserve thousands of stories in more than 25 Indigenous languages as a resource for Indigenous communities, students, academics and the public to use and to contribute to. It was launched by Dr Tom Calma AO.

CDU Northern Institute Professor of Education and project leader Michael Christie, delivered a public lecture as part of the launch.

More information about the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages is available from the CDU website. 

 

 

 Tobacco plant and molecule

Image: Tobacco plant and molecule
Image courtesy: Dr Fung Lay

Tobacco plant has key to fighting cancer
Media issued by La Trobe University
2 April 2014

Scientists at La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science have identified a tobacco plant's natural defence mechanisms could be harnessed to kill cancer cells in the human body.

The defence molecule, called NaD1, works by forming a pincer-like structure that grips onto lipids present in the membrane of cancer cells and rips it open, causing the cell to expel its contents and explode.

The discovery is the result of a multidisciplinary collaboration. The research utilised equipment at the Australian Synchrotron and was supported by an ARC Discovery Project grant, Hexime Ltd., Balmoral Pty Ltd.

 

 

Jo Whittaker, recent ARC DECRA recipient

Image: Jo Whittaker, recent ARC DECRA recipient. 
Image courtesy: L'Oréal Australia/sdpmedia.com.au

2013 Fellow at work – Jo Wittaker: rocking geophysics
Media issued by Science in Public—L'Oreal
4 April 2014

Recently boosted by winning a prestigious three-year, $389 339 ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award, Dr Whittaker is working to understand how plumes of molten rock drive the movement of continents, and how the internal workings of the planet form the landscapes on the surface.

She presented a talk in San Francisco at the American Geophysical Union last year and has been invited to speak at the European Geophysical Union Annual meeting in Vienna in April.

More information about Dr Whittaker's research can be found here.

 

 

March

 

Immune Cell

Image courtesy: Jeffrey Mak, The University of Queensland.

Immune cell defenders protect us from bacteria invasion
Media issued by the The University of Melbourne

31 March 2014

An international team of researchers, including University of Melbourne staff, supported by the new ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging and the National Health and Medical Research Council, has identified the exact biochemical key that awakes the body's immune cells and sends them into fight against bacteria and fungi.

The patented work provides a deeper understanding of our first line of defence, and what happens when it goes wrong. It will lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcers and even TB. It could also lead to novel protective vaccines.

 

 

kookaburra

Image: Australian Laughing Kookaburra 
Image courtesy: Michelle Meiklejohn Stock Photo - image ID: 10011579 FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Private land 'can help save Australia's imperilled wildlife'
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions
31 March 2014

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and The Australian National University (ANU) have found that unprotected areas are faring far better than old conservation reserves as sanctuaries for the nation's woodland birds. This is because some private lands, when compared with old conservation areas, contain more flat and fertile habitats where woodland birds prosper, say Professor David Lindenmayer and Ms Laura Rayner of CEED and ANU. The finding indicates that unprotected areas have great potential to conserve and restore native wildlife. The researchers also found that landowners who join Landcare groups or have off-farm incomes are more likely to undertake native revegetation, which may help to restore biodiversity on their lands. Professor Brendan Wintle of CEED and Unimelb says this is one of the first biodiversity models to combine social with ecological data.

 

 

Australian ACademy of Science

Image: Australian Academy of Science

Academy welcomes science leaders to Fellowship
Media issued by the Australian Academy of Science
28 March 2014

ARC CEO, Professor Aidan Byrne, has congratulated 21 leaders in Australian science on their election  to the Australian Academy of Science Fellowship. The new Fellows have been elected for their outstanding contributions to and application of scientific research. Every year the Academy honours the work of Australia's leading scientists with election to its Fellowship, which now numbers 481. New Fellows will be formally admitted to the Academy at its annual flagship event, Science at the Shine Dome, in Canberra this May, where they will make short presentations about their work.

 

 

Planet earth sketch

Image courtesy: ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science

Home computers to power climate change research
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science
25 March 2014

Any Australian with a home computer and an internet connection can now power up a climate model and help scientists find the causes of record high temperatures and drought that hit Australia and New Zealand in 2013. The online climate experiment, Weather@Home has been created by a group of scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, the University of Melbourne, University of Oxford in England, the UK Met Office, the University of Tasmania, and the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in New Zealand.

 

 

Artist impression of Type Ia supernovae.

Image: Artist impression of Type Ia supernovae. Courtesy: CAASTRO/Swinburne Astronomy Productions

Newton's gravity unchanged over cosmic time
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics
24 March 2014

[CAASTRO]) Australian astronomers have combined all observations of supernovae ever made to determine that the strength of gravity has remained unchanged over the last nine billion years.

Newton's gravitational constant, known as G, describes the attractive force between two objects, together with the separation between them and their masses.

CAASTRO is funded under the Australian Research Council Centres of Excellence scheme.

 

 

South African PhD student, Emma Gray

Image: South African PhD student, Emma Gray
Image courtesy: Science in Public

UNESCO-L'Oréal For Women in Science International Fellowship
Media issued by Macquarie University
20 March 2014

Congratulations to Emma Gray, announced as a 2014 UNESCO-L'Oréal For Women in Science International Fellow. Emma, from South Africa, will be working as a PhD student on an ARC Discovery Project at Macquarie University. Through her fellowship, Emma will look at why plant species grow at different rates and what factors limit or promote growth in different environments—contributing to a predictive model of how terrestrial systems are likely to respond to climate and land use change.

 

 

Professor Peter Corke with robot 

Image: Professor Peter Corke leads the new $19 million ARC Centre of Excellence in Robotic Vision 
Image courtesy: QUT

New centre will give robots the gift of sight
Media issued by Queensland University of Technology
18 March 2014

The new ARC Centre of Excellence in Robotic Vision, based at the Queensland University of Technology, will receive $19 million for its seven-year research program looking into the next generation of robots. Centre Director, Professor Peter Corke said the Centre will form one of the largest groups of its kind in the world, and will become a focal point for international activity. "This Centre will deliver the science and technologies that will turn cameras into powerful sensing devices capable of understanding and responding to their environment, and enabling robots to operate reliably over long periods, in complex unstructured surroundings where they will interact with humans as well as objects, many of which will require delicate handling."

 

 

Universe

Image: Universe 
Image courtesy: Salvatore Vuono / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hunt for water intensifies 
Media issued by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
18 March 2014

Scientists at the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) are using a promising new theory to track down hidden water both on Earth—where fresh water is becoming dangerously scarce in some regions—and in the quest for life on the red planet, Mars. The latest Earth-based groundwater theories may aid mankind in its quest for water on other planets. The NCGRT is jointly funded by the ARC and the National Water Commission under the ARC's Special Research Initiatives scheme.

 

 

Bromo Volcano Mountain

Image: Bromo Volcano Mountain.
Image courtesy: suwatpo/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Volcanoes helped species survive ice ages
Media issued by The Australian National University 
11 March 2014

An international team of researchers led by the Australian National University and Australian Antarctic Division has found evidence that the steam and heat from volcanoes and heated rocks allowed many species of plants and animals to survive past ice ages, helping understand how species respond to climate change. The research, supported by ARC funding, could solve a long-running mystery about how some species survived and continued to evolve through past ice ages in parts of the planet covered by glaciers.

 

 

budgie

Image courtesy: Salvatore Vuono/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Birds of a feather flock left or right
Media issued by The University of Queensland
7 March 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and the Queensland Brain Institute have discovered how flocks of birds navigate difficult environments, with individuals predisposed to favour the left or right side. The research—supported by an ARC Discovery Projects grant and ARC Centre of Excellence funding—sheds light on how birds fly in flocks without colliding with each other. The study found that budgerigars displayed an individual bias to fly to either the left or the right of objects—this inbuilt bias allows flocks to quickly navigate past obstacles by splitting up and not slowing down due to crowding.

 

 

Mars

Image: Mars 
Image courtesy: fotographic1980 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Critical mass not needed for supernova explosions
Media issued by The Australian National University
4 March 2014

Astronomers searching for clues about dark energy, the mysterious force that is speeding up the expansion of the Universe, have uncovered new evidence about the nature of supernovae, finding many are lighter than expected. The findings, by researchers collaborating with the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) and led by the Australian National University, overturn previous understanding of white dwarf stars and raise new questions about how these stars explode.

 

 

Image: Black and White Freisan Cow iStockphoto.com / © gordondix

Skinny solution: How sound waves are being used to separate fat from milk
Media issued by Swinburne University
4 March 2014

Sound waves may be key to creating the perfect cheese, as research into a new milk separation process looks to revolutionise Australia’s dairy industry. Swinburne University of Technology, together with CSIRO, is researching different skimming technologies through a project partly supported by the ARC’s Linkage Projects scheme. Swinburne’s Associate Professor Richard Manasseh and his team are working with electrical and food process engineers from CSIRO, as well as dairy industry members to examine how ultrasonic waves can be used to gently skim milk.

 

 

February

 ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions logo

Image: ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) logo
Image courtesy: CEED

Beating poachers - with mathematics
Media issued by the University of Queensland
26 February 2014

Environmental scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at The University of Queensland have developed a new, low-cost way to save rare animals and plants from poachers and plunderers—using maths. The researchers used a cunning mathematical model to outwit poachers in central Africa. CEED researcher and ARC Future Fellow, Dr Richard Fuller, said that by studying the poachers’ incursion patterns and prioritising patrols, the technology could improve protection of endangered animals and plants where they most need it, while minimising patrol and conservation costs.

 

toad

Image: Toad
Image credit: Photo by Tim Dempster. 
Image courtesy: University of Technology Sydney

Tagged toads reveal secrets to invasion success
Media issued by the University of Technology Sydney
26 February 2014

Using a novel approach tagging 20 adult cane toads with acoustic fish tags, researchers have documented for the first time the normally nocturnal adult cane toad entering man-made dams to cool down and rehydrate during the day. How the normally tropical amphibian can survive long, hot dry seasons in arid Australia has been puzzling scientists, but UTS-led research—supported by the ARC—has finally revealed the amphibian's secret: the toad may be changing a key behaviour to survive harsh conditions, thereby improving its chances of ongoing success.

 

Science in Public FameLab logo

Image courtesy: Science in Public (FameLab logo)

Opportunity for young researchers: (link is external) Nominations for FameLab Australia have been extended until midday, Monday, 3 March 2014.

FameLab Australia is an initiative to train, profile and present young/early-career researchers to the media and the public. FameLab is an international communication competition for scientists, including engineers and mathematicians. Designed to inspire and motivate young researchers to actively engage with the public and with potential stakeholders. FameLab is all about finding the best new voices of science and engineering across the world. For more information or to apply visit FameLab (link is external).

 

ACES researchers point out a potential application for fishing line muscles

Image: Researchers point out a potential application for fishing line muscles - replacing noisy motors for louvered windows that respond to changes in temperature. From left: Prof Ray Baughman, Prof Gordon Wallace, Dr Javad Foroughi, Prof John Madden, Sina Naficy, Prof Geoff Spinks 
Image courtesy: ACES

Scientists hook a big one with ordinary fishing line
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science
20 February 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong have used ordinary, everyday fishing line to produce artificial muscles with super human strength. By twisting and coiling simple fishing line and applying heat, powerful artificial muscles are produced. The new muscles can lift one hundred times more weight and generate one hundred times higher mechanical power than human muscle.

 

 

Professor Large and Professor Maslennikov on the hunt for suitable black shales in Siberia

Image: Professor Large and Professor Maslennikov on the hunt for suitable black shales in Siberia. 
Image courtesy: UTAS

Life stuck in slime for a billion years
Media published by Science in Public
19 February 2014 

Researchers at the University of Tasmania (UTAS) have revealed ancient conditions that almost ended life on Earth, using a new technique they developed to hunt for mineral deposits. According to UTAS geologist Professor Ross Large and his international team, the key was a lack of oxygen and nutrient elements, which placed evolution in a precarious position.

 

  

Professor Leonard Collard

Image: Professor Leonard Collard 
Image courtesy: University of Western Australia

New media to throw a lifeline to an ancient language
Media issued by the University of Western Australia
11 February 2014

A new project will create the world's first Aboriginal version of Wikipedia as a way of preserving the ancient and endangered Noongar language—one of Australia's biggest Aboriginal language groups. Professor Leonard Collard at The University of Western Australia's School of Indigenous Studies leads the $610 000, three-year project with colleagues at Curtin University.

 

 

January

Endoscope probe

Image: Endoscope probe. 
Image courtesy Swinburne University of Technology

Medical imaging breakthrough may lead to early cancer detection
Media issued by Swinburne University of Technology
10 January 2014

A breakthrough technique for super-resolution 3D medical imaging of living cells has been developed by researchers at Swinburne University of Technology. The new technique could potentially aid in minimally-invasive surgery and the early detection of cancer. ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor Min Gu and his colleagues Dr Xiangping Li and Dr Hong Kang applied a new technique to—for the first time—demonstrate that greater image definition can be achieved.

 

Australian Academy of Science logo

Image: Australian Academy of Science

Congratulations to the Australian Academy of Science Award recipients
Media issued by the Australian Academy of Science
23 January 2014

The ARC congratulates all recipients of the 2014 Australian Academy of Science (link is external) honorific, research and travelling fellowship award winners, honouring achievements in Australian science. In particular, congratulations to Professor Katherine Belov, Professor Min Gu, Winthrop Professor Ryan Lister, Associate Professor Richard Payne, Professor Geoffrey Pryde, Dr Maria Seton, Professor Chris Turney, Associate Professor David Warton, Dr Gavin Young, Dr Catherine Foley, Dr Kieran Harvey, Dr Rodney van der Ree and Emeritus Professor Curt Wentrup, who have been assisted by funding through the ARC's National Competitive Grants Program.

 

 

Dr Monica Gagliano, The University of Western Australia

Image: Dr Monica Gagliano, The University of Western Australia

Move over elephants – mimosas have memories too – PDF Format (303KB) - Word Format (64KB) 
Media issued by The University of Western Australia
15 January 2014

Dr Monica Gagliano, an ARC research fellow at The University of Western Australia's Centre for Evolutionary Biology, has solid evidence to support her theories that plants are not only able to 'talk' using sound, but 'learn' as well.

Dr Gagliano and her team show that Mimosa pudica plants can learn and remember just as well as it would be expected of animals, however, they do it all without a brain. Using the same experimental framework normally applied to test learnt behavioural responses and trade-offs in animals, the team designed experiments as if Mimosa was indeed an animal.

 

 

Ms Andrea Bianca-Redondo, Dr Chad Husko, and Professor Ben Eggleton at their soliton compression experiment

Image: Ms Andrea Bianca-Redondo, Dr Chad Husko, and Professor Ben Eggleton at their soliton compression experiment. 
Image Courtesy: The ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS)

A first in silicon photonics research
Media issued by the University of Sydney
15 January 2014

An international research team, led by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at the University of Sydney, have observed an on-chip soliton compression in a silicon photonic crystal for the first time.

The team is pursuing this avenue of research in line with the mission of CUDOS to develop photonic chips that are 'faster, smaller, greener'.

 

 

Newborn baby in incubator

Image: Newborn baby in incubator. 
Image Courtesy: ©iStockphoto.com / metinkiyak

Higher risk of birth problems after assisted conception
Media issued by the University of Adelaide 
9 January 2014

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, jointly funded by the ARC and the NHMRC, researchers at the University of Adelaide have shown that the risk of serious complications such as stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight and neonatal death is around twice as high for babies conceived by assisted reproductive therapies compared with naturally conceived babies.

 

 

The conch snail

Image: The conch snail stops jumping or takes longer to jump when exposed to the levels of carbon dioxide projected for the end of this century. 
Image courtesy: James Cook University

Jumping snails left grounded in future oceans
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
7 January 2014

An international team including researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University has discovered sea snails that leap to escape their predators may soon lose their extraordinary jumping ability because of rising human carbon dioxide emissions.

 

Schematic representation of a honeybee flying down a tunnel

Image: Schematic representation of a honeybee flying down a tunnel that is illuminated with polarized overhead light, in an experiment to investigate how honeybees use information from the polarization pattern in the sky to signal the direction of a food source to their nest mates. 
Image courtesy 
P. Kraft and M.V. Srinivasan

Bees dance points the way
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and Queensland Brain Institute
6 January 2014

New research supported by the ARC has found that honeybees use a pattern of light in the sky invisible to humans to direct one another to a honey source.

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science have demonstrated that even on days when the sun doesn't shine, bees can navigate to and from a honey source by reading the pattern of polarised light in the sky and then explain to other bees where to find it with their 'waggle dance'.

The image shown here is a schematic representation of a honeybee flying down a tunnel that is illuminated with polarized overhead light, in an experiment to investigate how honeybees use information from the polarization pattern in the sky to signal the direction of a food source to their nest mates.

 

 

Sunshine

Solution to cloud riddle reveals hotter future
Media issued by The University of New South Wales
1 January 2014

Research undertaken by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science at The University of New South Wales has found that global average temperatures will rise at least 4°C by 2100 and potentially more than 8°C by 2200 if carbon dioxide emissions are not reduced. [top]

 

2013

December

  • ARC Centre of  Excellence involved in landmark report on aviation biofuels – 17 December 2013               
    An  aviation biofuels study was commissioned by Qantas in 2012/13 to review the  commercial feasibility and long-term viability of Sustainable Aviation Fuel  (SAF), using certified refining technology and infrastructure in Australia. Qantas  formed a joint study team which included the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant  Cell Walls at the University of Adelaide. The full Report can be found at the Qantas  "Environment" website and further information on the ARC Centre of  Excellence in Plant Cell Walls' biofuel research is available from the Centre's "Biofuel  from Plants" page.
  • Researchers grow kidney from stem cells - 16 December 2013
    Media issued by Stem Cells Australia
    Australian researchers have made  a major leap forward in treating renal disease, announcing they have grown a  kidney using stem cells. The breakthrough paves the way for improved treatments  for patients with kidney disease and bodes well for the future of the wider  field of bioengineering organs. The research, published in Nature Cell  Biology, is supported by  the ARC as part of the Stem Cells Australia Special Research Initiative, the  National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the Queensland  Government.
  • New  collaboration to make next-generation computers faster and more powerful – 6 December 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Sydney
    The NSW Government will contribute $300 000 to a photonics  research project between the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth  Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at the University of Sydney, and Technion, the  Israel institute of technology. Centre Director, Professor Ben Eggleton, said  the partnership would allow CUDOS and Technion to work together on fundamental  aspects of nanophotonics and towards realising chip-based optical interconnects  which can revolutionise computing—dramatically increasing the available  bandwidth and, therefore, processing speed.
  • New technique offers potential for  more affordable drugs - 5 December 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Queensland

    University of Queensland researchers have pioneered a drug development  technique that could pave the way for a new class of low-cost medicines. The researchers, led by Professor David Fairlie and Dr Robert Reid from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), designed a technique that reduces  large proteins to small molecules suitable for use as drugs. The research, published in leading scientific journal Nature Communications, was supported by the ARC and National Health and Medical Research Council.
  • Scientists find freshwater sources under the sea floor – 5 December 2013            
    Media issued by The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training         
    Scientists at the NCGRT have discovered huge reserves of freshwater kilometres out to the sea, providing new opportunities to stave off a looming global water crisis. Their work has revealed an estimated half a million cubic kilometres of low-salinity water is buried beneath the seabed on continental shelves around the world. There are ways to access this water: to build a platform out at sea and drill into the seabed, or drill from the mainland or islands close to the aquifers. The NCGRT is jointly funded by the ARC and the National Water Commission (NWC).
  • BioPen to rewrite orthopaedic implants surgery – 4 December 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Wollongong    
    A handheld "bio pen" developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterial Science at the University of Wollongong will allow surgeons to repair damaged and diseased bone material by delivering live cells and growth factors directly to the site of injury, accelerating the regeneration of functional bone and cartilage. The prototype BioPen will give surgeons greater control over where materials are deposited, while also reducing the time a patient is in surgery.

 

November

  • Congratulations to WAs 2013 Tally Poppies – 29  November 2013          
    Media issued by The University of Western Australia
    The ARC congratulates 2013 WA Tall Poppy award recipient, Professor Ryan Lister, genome biologist from the ARC Centre for Excellence in Plant Energy at The University of Western Australia. The awards recognise individuals who combine world-class research with a passionate commitment to communicating science and who  demonstrate great leadership potential. Professor Lister is an ARC Future Fellow. Also a finalist was Dr James Miller-Jones, from the Curtin Institute of  Radio Astronomy at Curtin University, also currently receiving ARC Discovery Project funding.
  • CEPAR highlights importance of population ageing research - 19 November             
    Population  ageing is a global phenomenon. The ARC Centre of  Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR) is developing research and  working with industry and government on the best way to tackle the significant social and economic challenges and opportunities this presents. A new video from the Centre  highlights the research the Centre is currently undertaking. CEPAR is proudly supported by the ARC through as a Centre of Excellence.
  • New research shows unusual El Ninos to occur twice as  often - 17 November 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science
    New collaborative research, led by authors from the ARC  Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, has revealed that the unusual  El Ninos like those that led to the extraordinary super El Nino years of 1982  and 1997, will occur twice as often under even modest global warming scenarios. The findings have been published in Nature.
  • Congratulations to the 2013 Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize recipients – 14  September 2013             
    Media issued by Science in Public
    The ARC congratulates the 2013 Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize recipient, Dr  Connie Wong from Monash University. The award recognises outstanding  creativity in biomedical research by young scientists.  Dr Wong—currently receiving funding under the ARC Discovery Early Career  Research Award scheme—received the $25,000 award for her research  into stroke and its weakening of the immune system. Finalists also included Dr  William Ritchie from the Centenary Institute and Dr Anne Abbott from Monash  University.       

 

October

  • Corals fight warming oceans - 24 October 2013             
    Media issued by Science Alert
    Research undertaken at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University reveals coral animals produce the 'smell of the ocean'—influencing cloud formation and protecting  themselves against rising seawater temperatures. Australian marine scientists have found the first evidence that coral itself may play an important role in regulating local climate. They have discovered that the coral animal—not just its algal symbiont—makes an important sulphur-based molecule with properties to assist it in many ways, ranging from cellular protection in times of heat stress to local climate cooling by encouraging clouds to form.
  • Bees nearly joined the dinosaurs - 24 October 2013            
    Media issued by Flinders University
    The cataclysmic events that wiped out the land dinosaurs some 65 million years ago took a toll on smaller creatures too, causing widespread extinction in bees, Flinders University research has found. In a world first, research by biological scientists Associate Professor Mike Schwarz (supported by ARC funding), Dr Sandra Rehan and Dr Remko Leys has shown that the events at the so-called K-T boundary caused massive extinctions among bee populations, reflected in major changes in the development of flowering plants on Earth.
  • Research brings  unbreakable phones one step closer – 23 October 2013            
    Media issued by RMIT University
    Imagine dropping your phone and seeing it bounce rather than  break. Research at RMIT University is bringing that day closer. The research, supported by Australian Post-Doctoral Fellowships from the ARC to Dr Bhaskaran  and Dr Sharath Sriram, is advancing transparent bendable electronics for use in  science fiction-like gadgets - unbreakable rubber-like phones, rollable tablets  and even functional clothing. Researchers from RMIT's Functional Materials and  Microsystems research group have developed a new method to transfer electronics  with versatile functionality, which are usually made on rigid silicon, onto a  flexible surface.
  • Rescuing wildlife with maths – 18 October 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions
    In a bid to save endangered animals from extinction by  climate change, a team of Australian and New Zealand environmental scientists  has pioneered a revolutionary way of deciding whether animals can safely be  re-located. The researchers have 'test-driven' the new framework using the  hypothetical case of the New Zealand tuatara, the country's largest reptile, which is being considered for relocation from its home on a number of small  offshore islands in the north of NZ to the South Island, where it is currently extinct. The study was co-funded by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED).
  • Photons on demand now possible on hair's width optical chip - 11 October 2013            
    Media issued by The University of Sydney
    A breakthrough  in photonics that will help create extremely compact optical chips, a hair's  width in size and delivering a photon at a time, has been achieved by  researchers from the University of Sydney. "This result  has applications in the development of complex quantum technologies, including  completely secure communications, quantum measurement, the simulation of  biological and chemical systems and of course quantum computing," said Dr Alex  Clark, leader of the research team from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS). Carried out at the University of Sydney's School of  Physics, the research is published in Nature  Communications today.
  • Corals 'can fight acidifying oceans' - 11 October 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
    In a  world-first, scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef  Studies (CoECRS) have shown that tropical corals have the ability to fight back against acidifying oceans caused by human emissions of carbon dioxide. While the threat of coral bleaching from higher sea-surface temperatures and direct  human impacts still present serious risks to the long-term prospects for coral reefs, the research findings suggest that many corals have the ability to largely offset the effects of increasingly acidic oceans.           
  • Seafood lovers 'can help save our reefs' - 10 October 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies            
    Seafood  lovers can play a crucial role in deciding the fate of the world's coral reefs  and their gorgeously-coloured fish, according toa leading marine scientist. Seafood consumption is a major driver of overfishing and destruction of reef  communities globally but there are some encouraging signs that consumers may be willing to eat more sustainably. These research outcomes will be presented  by Dr Mike Fabinyi of the ARC Centre of  Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the Coral  Reefs in the 21st Century symposium in Townsville on Friday 11th October.

 

September

  • Early test warns of world’s leading eye disease - 23 September 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science
    A new, quick and simple eye test can predict who is more at risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence  in Vision Science have found that while people with early AMD can still see in fine detail, other parts of their vision may be damaged and this isn’t  revealed by current eye tests. The new test can show doctors or optometrists where to look and when to watch a patient more closely, helping them to lessen the risk of the disease and avoid total blindness.
  • Congratulations to the 2013 Scopus Young Researcher Award recipients – 13 September 2013            
    Media issued by Elsevier
    The ARC congratulates the 2013 Scopus Young Researcher Award recipients. The awards recognise these academics as some of Australia’s most distinguished young  researchers for their outstanding achievements. Four out of the five recipients of the Scopus awards this year have been assisted by funding through the ARC’s National Competitive Grants Program, they are: Dr Zenobia Jacobs, Professor Bryan Gaensler, Dr Da-Wei Wang and Dr Barry Brook. The ARC is proud to support all  research, but especially to encourage and develop our up-and-coming research leaders who are the innovators of Australia’s future.
  • ARC Future Fellow receives Queensland Literary Award – 10 September 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Western Australia
    The ARC congratulates ARC Future Fellow, Professor Jane Lydon for  winning the history book category in the 2013 Queensland Literary Awards for  her photographic work The Flash of Recognition: Photography and the  Emergence of Indigenous Rights. The ARC values her contribution to archaeology, in particular Australia’s colonial past and its legacies in the present. The ARC is pleased that Professor Lydon’s outstanding achievements in this field have been recognised  with this prestigious award. The ARC is proud to support her research work, particularly through a Future Fellowship.
  • Congratulations to the 2013 Eureka Prize recipients– 4 September 2013             
    Media issued by the Australian Museum
    The ARC congratulates the 2013 Eureka Prize recipients. The awards honour their contribution to Australian research,  knowledge and innovation and the impact they will have on our future  prosperity. The awards are recognition by the Australian community of the important  role they play in Australia’s future. The ARC is proud to support the research of a number of Eureka Prize recipients, including: Professor Frank Caruso, Dr Kerrie Wilson, Professor Lloyd  Hollenberg, Professor Rob Brooks, Professor Rick Shine,  Professor James McCluskey, Professor Jamie Rossjohn, Professor Ary Hoffmann, Dr Elizabeth McGraw, Dr Michael Letnic and Associate Professor David Wilson.

 

August

  • Solving secrets of the wine cellar - 30 August 2013             
    Media issued by UWA Institue of Agriculture
    Cutting-edge technology is being used by researchers at The University of Western Australia and Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA) to identify differences in the top Cabernet Sauvignon grape clones to benefit the local wine industry and consumers.The project will apply cutting-edge techniques in genomics to several clones on which extensive knowledge is already available from Western Australian and South Australian improvement programs. In addition to the genomic component, the project will include vineyard studies. The three-year project has received total funding of $574,000 from the Australian Research Council. The research is supported by 24 companies represented by the WA Vine Improvement Association, prominent national retailer Yalumba and the Australian Wine Research Institute.
  • Saving Earth’s water from toxic waste – 20 August 2013             
    Media issued by The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
    Scientists at The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training  (part-funded by the ARC) and University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have devised  a better way to protect groundwater from acids, heavy metals and toxic  chemicals, helping to secure the Earth’s main freshwater supply. The  advance is a major step towards shielding groundwater from mining, industrial  and domestic waste, all of which can contaminate the water for decades, rendering it unusable and undrinkable.
  • Nemo can’t go home – 20 August 2013             
    Media issued by The ARCCentre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
    An international team of marine scientists with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University has found that sea anemones, which provide shelter for clownfish and 27 other fish species, are facing the same worldwide threat as coral reefs— bleaching and loss due to rising water temperatures.
  • Tiny fish makes ‘eyes’ at their killer – 19 August 2013            
    Media issued by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
               
    New research has found that small prey fish can grow a bigger ‘eye’ on their rear fins as a way of distracting predators and dramatically boosting their chances of survival. The research undertaken at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) is a world-first discovery, and has not only found that these fish can grow a larger false ‘eye spot’ near their tail, but they can also reduce the size of their real eyes.

 

July

  • Scientists look to the ocean as fuel of the future – 10 July 2013               
    Media issued by Reuters.com
    Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) centre at the University of Wollongong in Australia have found a new way to split seawater into hydrogen and oxygen, and use those gases as fuel. Click here to view video and transcript.
  • How coral cures your ills - 1 July 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
    A dramatic discovery by an Australian team of scientists has revealed that the ability of humans to resist bacterial diseases may go as far back in our ancestry as corals. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) have found three genes in Acropora (staghorn) corals which show a very fast, strong immune response to the presence of bacteria – and the same genes also occur in mammals, including people. The main goal of the research is to better understand the mechanisms by which corals resist attack by bacteria and viruses – an urgent task in view of a massive upsurge in coral diseases around the world, which researchers attribute to the impact of human activity on the oceans and on coral reefs themselves.

 

June

  • New step towards silicon-based quantum computer - 19 June 2013               
    Media issued by The University of New South Wales            
    UNSW researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology have proposed a new way to distinguish between quantum bits that are placed only a few nanometres apart in a silicon chip, taking them a step closer to the construction of a large-scale quantum computer. Quantum bits, or qubits, are the basic building blocks of quantum computers—ultra-powerful  devices that will offer enormous advantages for solving complex problems. Professor Michelle Simmons, leader of the research team, said a qubit based on  the spin of an individual electron bound to a phosphorus atom within a silicon chip is one of the most promising systems for building a practical quantum computer, due to silicon's widespread use in the microelectronics industry.

  • Making memories brings us closer to  quantum computers - 19 June 2013               
    Media issued by The University of Sydney       
    A breakthrough which brings us closer to solving problems more complex than any current supercomputer can address, in codebreaking, physics, and clean energy, has been achieved by researchers from the University of Sydney and Dartmouth College in the US. "This work brings us closer to creating a quantum computer powerful enough that it could one day be used in developing new materials for clean-energy distribution or in rapidly searching through massive amounts of unsorted data to identify security threats online: problems on which even today’s most powerful supercomputers fail," said Dr Michael Biercuk, Director of the Quantum Control Laboratory in the University of Sydney’s School of Physics and ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems. The details of how the researchers developed an entirely new way of designing a practically useful quantum memory, a key need for future quantum computers, will be published in Nature Communications on Thursday, 19 June.

  • Australian  researchers part of international team to combat heart disease - 17 June 2013               
    Media issued by Stem Cells Australia           
    An international consortium of cardiac stem cell experts has been awarded a prestigious grant to better understand the role of these cells in heart function and repair. The six year USD$6million grant awarded by the France-based Fondation Leducq Transatlantic Networks of  Excellence will enable this multi-disciplinary international team to reveal more about cardiac stem cells and their role in heart function and repair. Stem Cells Australia is funded by the ARC as a Special Research Initiative.

  • Plastics for bags and bodies - 4 June 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Sydney           
    Biomolecular engineers at the University of Sydney are creating cleaner, more cost-effective PPC polymers that promise to transform the biodegradable polymer industry. The plastics being developed will have a broad range of usability, at one end of the spectrum being used for fully recyclable shopping bags, at the other, as restorative implants in the human body. The project has been funded by both the Australian Research Council and bioplastics subsidiary CO2Starch.
  • Rare tree provides key to greener chemistry - 2 June 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology
    A rare tree found in Malaysia and Borneo holds the secret to greener chemical production, according to researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). The research team, led by Professor Michael Sherburn and Dr Andrew Lawrence from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology at ANU, have created a new, environmentally friendly method to replicate molecules found in the Medang tree. These molecules, known as kingianins, have shown promise as a lead in anti-cancer drug development, but research has been hampered due to the vanishingly small quantities that can be extracted from the Medang tree.

 

May

  • Deep refuges ‘can help save our reefs’ – 30 May 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies        
    Marine scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and the USA are calling out for global efforts to protect deeper coral reefs as insurance against the widespread destruction of shallow reefs and their fish stocks now taking place around the world. In research published in the journal Nature Climate Change the scientists argue that efforts to identify and protect reefs lying 30-150 metres below the surface should be stepped up, so as to provide a secure refuge for fish and corals that can also live on deeper reefs.
  • Coral reefs ‘ruled by earthquakes and volcanoes’ - 22 May 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies          
    A world-first study from the ARC Centre of  Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) has found that titanic forces in the Earth’s crust explains why the abundance and richness of coral varies dramatically across the vast expanse of the Indian and Pacific oceans. Scientists from CoECRS reveal that abrupt changes in the mix of coral species  are associated with earthquakes, volcanoes and jostling among the earth’s giant tectonic plates. The study shows that slow geological processes generate the patterns of reef biodiversity that we see today. This also explains why some coral species are more widespread than others. It is understood that rich coral communities arise from geological processes that take place over millions of years and they will be even harder to replace if lost due to global warming.
  • Strawberry fields forever and fungus-free - 22 May 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Western Australia School of Plant Biology   
    Researchers at The University of Western Australia have identified mechanisms that strawberry plants use to combat a serious strawberry fungus, which will pave the way for developing new strawberry cultivars with improved resistance to the fungus. This will mean growers should be able to use fewer anti-fungal chemicals, with reduced input cost and improved outcome on human health and the environment. The researchers' findings provide the first understanding of strawberry plant resistance at a molecular level and it’s hoped more effective and sustainable disease management strategies can be adopted locally and nationally. The research is supported by the ARC.
  • US  Government funds US/Australian/Indian collaboration for abiotic stress tolerant  cereals - 22 May 2013             
    Media issued by The Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics           
    A new research programme is being supported by the  US Agency for International Development (USAID) in partnership with The Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) and Vibha Agrotech Limited to apply transgenic technologies to enhance environmental stress tolerance in cereal crops. The research is part of the US government’s global  hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. The collaboration will combine the ACPFG gene systems and technologies with the field evaluation and rice transformation capabilities of Vibha. A series of transgenic wheat and  rice lines will be developed that show enhanced tolerance to drought and salinity stresses.
  • 3-D models of root architecture predicts traits for specific environments- 20 May 2013              
    Media issued by the School  of Earth and Environment University of Western Australia        
    Scientists may soon be able to develop crop  plants with roots that can cope with challenging soil and environmental conditions. A new study has suggested that it is possible to develop crop  varieties for different environments by using a combination of plant selection and computer simulation modelling. Researchers from the University of Western Australia, the Department of Agriculture and Food in Western Australia and institutions in Tasmania and Germany have compared modelling simulations with  glasshouse varieties. This has given scientists valuable information in crop plant roots and how they take up water and nutrients.
  • Saturation wreaks deep benefits - 14 May  2013            
    Media issued by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training            
    Scientists from Australia’s  National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) say they have  been impressed with recharge rates of groundwater following the 2011 floods in  Queensland and Victoria. Researchers at the NCGRT are making estimates of Australian groundwater availability in the future based on learning gauged from the recent floods. With this information the NCGRT intends to provide state and Australian Government water authorities with a clearer picture of ground water  demands. This information will also look at how to form sustainable procedures  for Australia’s underground reserves well into the future. The NCGRT is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the ARC and the National Water Commission.
  • Saline tolerant plants- 10 May 2013              
    Media issued by the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics        
    A technology that enhances salinity tolerance in  plants has been secured by the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics. The technology was secured after field testing in Western Australia showed  significant improvements in barley yields. The technology, discovered at the  University of Connecticut (UConn) by world renowned scientist Dr Roberto  Gaxiola, will be used to improve Australian cereal varieties.
  • ARC Laureate Fellow Professor Peter Hall  elected to National Academy of Sciences– 2 May 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Melbourne        
    ARC CEO, Professor Aidan Byrne, congratulates 2011 ARC Laureate Fellow  Professor Peter Hall from the University of Melbourne for his election to the  prestigious US-based National Academy of Science (NAS). Professor Hall has  been elected  in recognition  of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.  Professor Hall is a world-leading researcher in probability and mathematical  statistics, and in 2011, Professor Hall received his fourth ARC Laureate Fellowship to develop important advances in statistics, leading to new  statistical methodologies.
  • Ancient archaeological dig reveals in Southeast Asia –  1 May 2013               
    Media issued by The Australian National University School of Archaeology and Anthropology       
    More  than 140 ancient burials including men, women, teenagers and children have been  recovered from a site in the Thanh Hoa province in Northern Vietnam. The dig is  being led by Dr Marc Oxenham  from The Australian National University's School of Archaeology and Anthropology with funding support from the Australian Research Council. The burial site, known as Con Co Ngua, is believed to have existed sometime between  5000 and 6000 years ago. Rising sea levels have helped preserve the site under a thick cap of marine clay.

 

April

  • Saving city wildlife - 29 April 2013               
    Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions             
    Natural urban ecosystems and protecting wildlife  is often overlooked during the urban planning process. The loss of natural  ecosystems in cities poses a risk to public health and the quality of life of  urban citizens according to Dr Sarah Bekessy form the ARC Centre of Excellence  for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and RMIT University. Australian citizens can  become more involved in planning their cities with wildlife in mind thanks to a  new tool developed by the CEED team. The tool ranks sites for development  according to various priorities such as biodiversity loss, flood risk and  transport.
  • First Australian win for US plant  biology award - 19 April 2013            
    Media issued by University of Western Australia      
    The University  of Western Australia's internationally recognised plant scientist Winthrop  Professor Harvey Millar has become the first Australian to win a prestigious  American award in its 40-year history. Professor Millar, who is Deputy Director  at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at UWA, has a passion  for proteins and how they work and has built a remarkable career in the 16  years since he graduated from The Australian National University with a PhD in  biochemistry.
  • Quantum computing taps nucleus of single atom - 18 April 2013 
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology          
    A team of Australian engineers from ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology and the University of New South Wales (UNSW) has demonstrated a quantum bit based on the nucleus of a single atom in silicon. The findings show promising dramatic improvements for data processing in ultra-powerful quantum computers of the future.
  • Scientists call for large ocean wilderness parks - 15 April 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies          
    Leading international marine scientists, including researchers  from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, have called for the  protection of larger marine wilderness areas in a bid to shield the world's dwindling stocks of fish from destruction. Scientists from Australia and the US  have been working in the world's largest unfished marine reserve, the remote  Chagos Archipelago in the central Indian Ocean to gather data. Their findings provide the world's first clear evidence that large-scale marine wilderness reserves are better for conserving fish than the  far more common, small marine protected areas that many governments and fishing communities are presently implementing.
  • New way to protect precious water - 10 April 2013            
    Media issued by the NCGRT     
    Researchers at  the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) have  developed a new model to predict where – and how fast – polluted groundwater can move from a contaminated site, allowing water managers to better locate and  clean up the water. The NCGRT is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the  ARC and the National Water Commission.
  • Optics innovation an industry success - 9  April 2013            
    Media issued by the University of Sydney     
    A researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for  Optical Systems (CUDOS), has  created a new processor technology that allows light to be split in extremely  sophisticated ways. The processor is a computer programmable optical filter  that can shape light. It can, for example, compress incoming light pulses to  become very short, or shape an incoming 'rainbow' of light into an output that  is only made up of red and blue light. The new technology has made its creator,  Dr Jochen Schroeder, the winner of the Innovation Prize from CUDOS (February  2013), celebrating Australian innovations in optics and photonics. It has also  been a successful technology transfer story, creating a wave of sales for Finisar, one of the world's Largest Supplier of Optical  Communication Components and Subsystems.
  • Discovery  measures greenhouse gases from space- 3 April 2013            
    Media issued by University of Western Australia             
    Supported by an ARC Discovery  program grant, scientists have discovered how to measure greenhouse gases 200  000 times faster as the result of research by an award-winning PhD student from  The University of Western Australia and a US team. The discovery, which is already being used by  NASA scientists in Space, has major implications for global warming research,  breath analysis (to detect illness), explosives detection, chemical process monitoring  and a range of other applications, including fundamental quantum theory.
  • Community  Power 'Can Rescue Failing Fish Stocks' - 1 April 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre for  Excellence in Coral Reef Studies          
    An international team of  scientists have used genetic 'fin-printing' to gather the first clear proof  that small traditional fishing grounds, that are effectively managed by local communities, can help re-stock both themselves and surrounding marine areas.  The finding has big implications for hundreds of millions of people around the  world who depend on coral reefs for food and livelihood. "This is a really  important finding, because it shows that small community-run fisheries can preserve their fish stocks and can boost fish stocks in a surrounding radius of  30 kilometres or more," said Dr Glenn Almany from the ARC Centre of Excellence  for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University.       

 

March

  • Improving the flow of the fibre optic freeway – 26 March 2013             
    Media issued by Monash University          
    Research  conducted at Monash University, supported by the ARC, has played an important  part in the invention of an energy-efficient method of increasing the data capacity of optical networks. It has the potential to dramatically boost the overall performance of networks such as the National Broadband Network (NBN), while reducing costs.  
  • Closing the gap between conservation and communities – 26 March 2013           
    Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions           
    Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have completed a world first study into how governments can balance the needs of society and  industry with those of endangered wildlife and environments. There is potential for this approach to dispel some of the long-running  tensions between conservationists, industry, government and communities.
  • Climate 'brings opportunities and threats to the Pacific' – 25  March 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre for  Excellence in Coral Reef Studies         
    Marine scientists from France, New Caledonia, Fiji and Australia (supported by the ARC Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies) have revealed that climate change will bring both big opportunities and threats to the Pacific region, where more than 25% of GDP (gross domestic product) depends upon fishing. Impacts include  a projected decline in coral reef fish, shellfish and crustacean harvests, along with a shift in tuna feeding and breeding grounds which would result in a  'net gain' in the south and east Pacific region.
  • New roads might  help environment – 21 March 2013             
    Media issued by James Cook University          
    The work  of leading ecologist Professor William Laurance, an ARC Laureate Fellow  researching Australia's leadership in tropical conservation science, has  featured in Nature. Professor  Laurance, along with colleague Professor Andrew Balmford (University of Cambridge, UK), has found that despite the  strong impact road construction has on forest destruction and wildfires, a global mapping programme can advise on where to avoid building new roads and close existing ones, to halt severe environmental damage.
  • Wallabies start pouch climb in womb – 17 March 2013             
    Media issued by Nature's Scientific Reports          
    Two  researchers at the University of Melbourne, supported by ARC grants, are part of a team which has completed a study of developmental events experienced by  small species of the kangaroo and wallaby family. This included the finding  that the tiny tammar fetus displays preparative climbing movements up to three  days before birth, exhibiting highly coordinated movements which don't occur until much later in eutherian mammals. The study involved collaboration with researchers from Germany.
  • Genetic mystery solved – 8 March 2013             
    Media issued by the University of  New South Wales          
    Research conducted by the UNSW's Dean of Science, Professor Merlin Crossley, has identified the final missing piece in the genetic puzzle of an unusual form of haemophilia, more than 20 years after he discovered the first two pieces. The research, which could help improve understanding of other blood-clotting conditions such as thrombosis, received funding from the Australian Research Council.
  • Local dig uncovers new species of ancient fish – 7 March 2013             
    Media issued by the Australian National University         
    An ARC Discovery Projects grant has assisted researchers at the Australian National University in discovering a new species of ancient fish. The researchers have unearthed the largest fossilised lobe-finned fish skull ever found in rocks of Devonian age. The fossils were found during an excavation of 360 million-year-old rock near Eden on the NSW South Coast.
  • Bacteria  and the bees: honey improves antibiotics – 1 March 2013             
    Media by University of Technology Sydney Newsroom           
    According to new findings by UTS researchers, supported by ARC Linkage Project funding, medical-grade manuka honey (Medihoney) can improve the effectiveness of antibiotics and prevent the emergence of resistance. This has significant implications for the fight  against drug-resistant bacteria such as the superbug MRSA (golden staph).
  • Scientists  call for legal trade in rhino horn – 1 March 2013            
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions           
    Due to the failure of a global ban on rhino products and soaring death rates among the world’s remaining population, four leading scientists (including Duan Biggs and  Hugh Possingham of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions) have argued for the introduction of a legal trade in rhino horn – in a last  ditch effort to save the species from extinction.

 

February

  • Shallow  reefs facing increased acidity – 27 February 2013             
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate  System Science              
    A study by Australian researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System  Science has revealed that heightened levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can lead to increased ocean acidity throughout shallow coastal reefs and ecosystems.
  • 'Blood test'  for crook corals  27 February 2013              
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef  Studies            
    Australian  researchers are developing a stress-test for coral, using a world-first  scientific discovery which measures how coral reefs are being impacted by  pressures from climate change and human activity.
  • Nesting site protection ‘key to save turtles from climate change’  - 19 February 2013              
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef  Studies           
    A new  study by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies reveals that some turtle populations in the West Indian, Northeast Indian,  North Pacific, East Atlantic and East Pacific oceans are among the least likely to recover from the impacts of climate change.
  • Supercomputers to supercharge antioxidants - 19 February 2013             
    Media by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology      
    The future of keeping ageing-related diseases at bay lies with the supercomputer   according to scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical  Chemistry and Biotechnology at The University of Sydney. Researchers have used sophisticated quantum chemistry and  powerful supercomputers to design improved antioxidants which will help stave  off ageing-related diseases like Alzheimer's and heart disease.
  • Aussies told: cut water use to save bush – 18 February 2013               
    Media  by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training            
    Australians may be asked to reduce  their use of bore water in order to preserve native landscapes. Researchers at the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) have found that eucalypts, melaleucas, acacias  and other Australian native trees drink much more groundwater than previously  thought. The NCGRT is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the ARC and the National Water Commission.
  • Australia’s creative economy surges – 11 February 2013              
    Media by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation         
    New research conducted at the ARC Centre of Excellence  for Creative Industries and Innovation has found more than half a million  Australians now work in the creative sector, making it one of the fastest  growing, dynamic segments of the national economy. Centre Director, Professor Stuart Cunningham, said the rate of growth was well above that for the  Australian workforce in general and it confirmed the trend evident in the past  two decades.
  • Secrets of ancient climate- 8 February 2013               
    Media by University of Wollongong          
    What  was Earth’s climate like almost four billion years ago? Given that the Sun was  30% cooler, was the Earth chilly or did an atmosphere much richer in greenhouse  gases keep it warm? These are among some of Earth’s secrets being answered by  researchers supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant. The research aims to solve problems surrounding Earth’s early climate almost four billion years ago, and to  understand the part that life might have already played in regulating it.
  • Crumbling bores 'jeopardise nation's water' - 4 February 2013             
    Media by National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training           
    Fifteen thousand collapsing bores – and a  half-billion dollar repair bill – are endangering the future of Australia’s  largest and most precious resource, its groundwater. The National Centre for  Groundwater Research and Training is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the Australian Research Council and the National Water Commission.           
  • Quantum microscope reveals cells – 4 February 2013             
    Media by University of Queensland           
    A team of Australian scientists has developed a  powerful microscope using the laws of quantum mechanics to probe the inner  workings of living cells. Team leader Associate Professor Warwick Bowen, of  UQ's ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, said the study  relied on quantum interactions between the photons of light to achieve measurement precision that surpassed conventional measurement.
  • Listening to electrons: new method brings scaling-up quantum devices one step closer - 1 February 2013
    Media by University of Sydney            
    Quantum devices  will revolutionise computing, enabling huge calculations to be completed that  classical computers simply cannot do. "Our new  method for detecting charge in quantum systems is exciting and has implications  for a range of nanotechnologies," said Associate Professor David Reilly, from the ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum  Systems in the School of  Physics at the University of Sydney.       

 

January

  • ‘Petri dish lens’ gives hope for new eye treatments – 31  January 2013               
    Media by Monash University              
    A cure for congenital sight  impairment caused by lens damage is closer following research by scientists at  Monash University. Associate Professor Tiziano Barberi and Dr Isabella  Mengarelli from the Australian  Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI) at Monash University are  closer to growing parts of the human eye in the lab. The study published in Stem Cells Translational Medicine was partly funded by the Australian Research  Council.
  • Ocean heatwave killed seaweed - 22 January 2013              
    Media by The University of Western Australia             
    The  decimation of a seaweed that provides vital habitat for an interdependent web of marine species off the West Australian coast, as a consequence of a record  ocean heatwave, has been revealed in a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The research was conducted by ARC Future Fellow, Associate  Professor Thomas Wernberg and his colleague Dr Daniel Smale.
  • Using HIV to attack itself – 21 January 2013               
    Media issued by the Queensland Institute of Medical Research            
    Associate Professor David Harrich, from QIMR’s Molecular Virology Laboratory, has determined how to modify a protein in the HIV virus, so that it instead  provides strong, lasting protection from infection. Associate Professor  Harrich has been researching HIV for thirty years, since starting as a research  assistant at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the early 1980s. An Australian Research Council Future Fellowship funds Professor Harrich’s research.
  • Tiny reef speedster challenges tuna in the ocean sprint– 14 January 2013             
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence Coral Reef Studies           
    Australian  scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and The Australian National University have found that tiny coral reef wrasses on the  Great Barrier Reef can swim as fast as some of the swiftest fish in the  ocean—but use only half as much energy to do so.
  • More room needed for  coastal wetlands - 13 January 2013              
    Media by the University of Queensland
    Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) say Australia’s planners and coastal communities need to think up to 100 years ahead to ensure the survival of mangroves, salt marshes, sedge lands and melaleuca swamps and their wildlife.
  • Results flatline for top students– 10 January 2013            
    Media issued by Melbourne University             
    A major Victorian study, funded by the ARC, looking into how teachers use test data to help children learn, has revealed that while  struggling students clocked up huge improvements after six months, the performances of top students stagnated.
  • Even If We Stopped Polluting Today, Ocean Garbage Patches Would Linger For Hundreds Of Years– 9 January 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science       
    The  Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a horrifying consequence of our never-ending  consumption. Now, new research shows that even if we could eliminate plastic waste and prevent all litter from making its way to the ocean, these Patches would continue to mar the planet for hundreds of years. 
  • Faster help for stroke patients– 4 January 2013             
    Media issued by The Vision Centre and The Australian National University          
    Researchers created a new vision test that assesses how much and which part of the brain of  a stroke victim has been damaged. The test requires patients to look into a  device for about ten minutes, enabling it to be used in the early stages of a  stroke – even if the patient cannot move their limbs or speak.

 

2012                            

December

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November

[top]

October

  • Citizen scientists 'helping discover Australia' – 24 October 2012             
    Media issued by SciNews. Full Article printed in Decision Point, October 2012          
    Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have found amateur naturalists and other unpaid 'citizen scientists' are playing a huge and vital role in the ongoing 'discovery' of Australia and all that it contains.

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September

  • Harnessing waste energy to power factories – 5 September 2012             
    Originally written and published by Science in Public
    Government-Industry collaboration through ARC Linkage Projects grant and Baxter Healthcare allowing researchers to look for ways to make factories more sustainable.
  • Seeds of an idea grow to fruition – 27 September 2012            
    Support  from the ARC has helped build a research career, and create innovative  products and industries.             
    Professor Peter Hodgson – Deakin University

[top]

August

  • Nano-structures to realise hydrogen’s energy potential –15 August 2012             
    Media issued by the University of New South Wales         
    In what has been described as world first  research, engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have demonstrated that hydrogen can be released and reabsorbed from a promising  storage material, overcoming a major hurdle to its use as an alternative fuel  source. The research supported by the ARC has been published in the journal ACS Nano.

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June

  • New tool for better breast cancer detection - 30 June 2012             
    Originally written and published by Science in Public     
    ARC Discovery Project grant empowering Queensland scientists to help radiologists to spot the more subtle signs of breast cancer, using computer tools and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

[top]

March

  • World’s smallest precision transistor a leap forward- 9 March 2012
    A functioning transistor the size of a single atom  may be a breakthrough for quantum computing             
    Professor Michelle Simmons - ARC Centre for Quantum  Computation and Communication - University of New South Wales       

[top]

Please visit our Research Profile page for new stories.

Archive for year 2016  |  2015  |  2014  |  2013   |  2012

2016

June 





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Tiny mirror improves microscope resolution for studying cells—17 June 2016

By growing cells on the mirrors and imaging them using super-resolution microscopy, a group of scientists from universities in Australia, China and the United States has addressed a problem that has long challenged scientists: seeing the structures of three dimensional cells with comparable resolution in each dimension. 

""

Bright spots shine light on the future of coral reefs—16 June 2016

A study undertaken by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has appeared on the cover of Nature, following the discovery of bright spots in coral reefs.

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Black hole collision—more gravitational waves found—16 June 2016

Researchers including scientists from The Australian National University (ANU), supported by funding from the Australian Research Council, have detected gravitational waves for a second time, caused by the collision of two black holes 14 and eight times the size of the sun.

""

New molecular design to get hydrogen-powered cars motoring—7 June 2016

A radical new process developed by researchers at The University of Melbourne, supported by ARC funding, allows hydrogen to be efficiently sourced from liquid formic acid, and could be one step forward in making the dream of hydrogen-powered cars an economic reality. 

May





""

Plants are in touch with the world around them—24 May 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at the University of Western Australia have found that the simple act of water droplets landing on a leaf causes an elaborate response inside of plants. A similar reaction is seen when plants are patted or touched, suggesting that they are highly aware of what is happening to them.

""

EQuS Chief Investigator named Australian Academy of Science Fellow—23 May 2016

ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum System researcher, Professor Halina Rubinsztein-Dunlop, has been named among the Australia Academy of Science Fellows for 2016.

""

Gravitational Wave team shares in major physics prizes—4 May 2016

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU)—supported through funding from the Australian Research Council—who worked on the first detection of gravitational waves, are among the team that has won two prestigious physics prizes: the $3 millionSpecial Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics and the $500,000 Gruber Prize for Cosmology

""

Well-travelled plankton could ride out warming oceans—3 May 2016

Research by the University of Technology Sydney, supported by ARC Discovery Projects funding, suggests that plankton have evolved to survive a wide range of conditions, thanks to their unexpectedly vast ocean travels.

 

 

April












""

Fellowship supports study into stress—22 April 2016

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) has announced that Dr Michael Baratta, Senior Research Associate in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder, is the successful recipient of the CNBP-American Australian Association (AAA) Fellowship for 2016.

""

 Nanomaterial to drive new generation of solar cells—19 April 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultra high Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) based at The Australian National University and the University of California Berkeley have discovered radical new properties in a nanomaterial that opens new possibilities for highly efficient thermophotovoltaic cells, which could one day harvest heat in the dark and turn it into electricity.

""

 New  training and research hubs officially launched at UWA—18 April 2016

Two new $20 million hubs to be used for international research and training in offshore oil and gas have been officially launched at The University of Western Australia (UWA). The hubs are part of the Australian Research Council Industrial Transformation Research Programme.

""

Quantum researchers find noise isn’t always bad—15 April 2016

A team of researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) and the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have shown how noise can help transfer energy faster and more efficiently. Energy is transported by waves. 

""

 New  ARC Training Centre for Gas Process Engineering—15 April 2016

A project to develop a breakthrough technique in nitrogen capture from natural gas (LNG) is just one project that will benefit from the ARC Training Centre for LNG Futures at The University of Western Australia as part of ARC’s Industrial Transformation Research Program.

""

From IT to black holes: nano-control of light pioneers new paths—8 April 2016

 A research team at RMIT University has created a breakthrough chip for the nano-manipulation of light, paving the way for next gen optical technologies and enabling deeper understanding of black holes.

EQuS researcher receives Westpac Research Fellowship—6 April 2016

Early career researcher Dr Ivan Kassal from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems will receive funding to further his research in solar-energy harvesting using quantum effects, receiving aWestpac Bicentennial Foundation inaugural Westpac Research Fellowship. 

UOW and Boron Molecular driving manufacturing innovation6 April 2016

University of Wollongong (UOW) researcher, Dr Zhenguo Huang, an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) recipient (2012–2015), has developed new and improved chemical formulas that provide the recipe for key ingredients in advanced energy storage.

""

ANU scientist named a Westpac research fellow—6 April 2016

ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher, Nanoscientist Dr Antonio Tricoli from The Australian National University (ANU), has won a prized Westpac Research Fellowship for his pioneering work on wearable technology that can help fight skin cancer and melanoma.

Chillin' with lasers: Using laser light to cool a quantum liquid—5 April 2016

Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems have, for the first time, used laser light to cool a special form of quantum liquid, called a superfluid. Lasers are widely used to cool gases and solid objects, but they have never before been applied to cool a quantum liquid. 

""

Big data to help see small cells—1 April 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have successfully combined computer analysis with microscopy, to extract highly detailed cellular information that will help distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as cancer, injury and inflammation.

March













""

Half a million dollar tick—29 March 2016

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging at Monash University, together with the University of Oxford, have discovered how proteins present in tick saliva prevent the immune system from running amok.

Handheld surgical 'pen' prints human stem cells—24 March 2016

Australian researchers have used a handheld 3D printing pen to ‘draw’ human stem cells in freeform patterns with extremely high survival rates.

""

Breakthrough technology to improve cyber security—22 March 2016

With enough computing effort, most contemporary security systems will be broken, but a research team at The University of Sydney has made a major breakthrough in generating single photons (light particles) as carriers of quantum information in security systems. 

""

Scientist witnesses severe coral bleaching—21 March 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have described scenes of widespread damage as coral bleaching extends its reach in the northern Great Barrier Reef.

""

World's thinnest lens to revolutionise cameras—11 March 2016

Researchers at The Australian National University, supported by ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher (DECRA) funding, have created the world's thinnest lens—one two-thousandth the thickness of a human hair—opening the door to flexible computer displays and a revolution in miniature cameras. 

""

Students boost future job prospects in automated world—10 March 2016

In a new partnership involving Queensland University of Technology’s ARC Centre of Excellence for Robotics Vision, school students will be inspired to pursue careers in coding, computer science and robotics, and be assisted to be ready for the challenges of a future automated workforce.

""

Revolutionary graphene filter could solve water crisis—10 March 2016


A new type of graphene-based filter could be the key to managing the global water crisis, according to research supported by the ARC.

""

Forgotten film could reveal new insights into post-war Australia—9 March 2016

An ARC-funded Discovery Project co-led by a Murdoch University academic could reveal new insights into Australian life and culture from the 1940s to the 1980s.

""

Shedding new light—9 March 2016

With funding from the ARC, the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy (MCEM) has commissioned a new piece of equipment providing Monash and other national and international researchers with a world-class tool to conduct their research. 

""

Science: a fun career that can change women's lives—9 March 2016

More than 300 high school students attending a Women in Science symposium on International Women’s Day led by Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla from The University of New South Wales (UNSW), have been encouraged to pursue careers in STEM to shape a better world. 

""

New way to control chemical reactions3 March 2016

A research team including The Australian National University, as part of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES), has harnessed static electricity to control chemical reactions for the first time, in a breakthrough that could bring cleaner industry and cheaper nanotechnology.

""

Gene switch makes us look like our animal cousins—1 March 2016

An international team of biologists, led by researchers at The University of Western Australia supported by ARC funding, has discovered how the same genes are turned on in mammals, fish and amphibians early in embryonic development, making them look incredibly similar for a brief period of time. 

February









""

Monash researchers developing wearable blood pressure monitor—29 February 2016

An ARC Future Fellow and his team have developed a new method for measuring blood pressure that may revolutionise the medical monitoring landscape.

""

Host galaxy of mysterious bright burst identified—25 February 2016

An international team of scientists including the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) and CSIRO has identified for the first time the precise location of a very rare explosive event, called a fast radio burst (FRB), in a distant galaxy. Using a combination of radio and optical telescopes, they were able to conduct a unique census of the Universe’s electron count. 

""

Faster, stronger, longer: accelerated evolutionary change in the cane toad—16 February 2006

Research undertaken by Australian Laureate Fellow, Professor Rick Shine, and his team at The University of Sydney,shows that the annual rate of progress of the cane toad invasion has increased five fold since their introduction into Queensland in 1935.

""

Tiny red crystals that dramatically increase biogas production could reduce need for new coal seam wells—16 February 2016

Researchers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW), supported by an ARC Linkage Projects grant and with industry partner, Biogas Energy, have discovered a way to produce a tenfold increase in the amount of methane gas emitted by naturally-occurring microbes living in coal seams and on food waste. 

""

Gene technology to help healthy skin in Aboriginal Australians—13 February 2016

Researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, supported by ARC Linkage Project funding, have used cutting-edge genome technologies to reveal the genetic makeup of a widespread skin parasite causing serious health problems in Aboriginal communities

""

 Stretchable nano-devices towards smart contact lenses—9 February 2016 

Researchers at RMIT University and The University of Adelaide, with funding support through the ARC’s Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities scheme, have joined forces to create a stretchable nano-scale device to manipulate light. 

""

Motorboat noise gives predators a deadly advantage—5 February 2016

A pioneering new study shows that the rate fish are captured by predators can double when boats are motoring nearby. Professor Mark McCormick from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University was part of an international research team that found noise from passing motorboats increases stress levels in young coral reef fish and reduces their ability to flee from predators. 

""

Counting cancer-busting oxygen molecules—5 February 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have shown that nanoparticles, used in combination with X-rays, are a viable method for killing cancer cells deep within the living body. 

January










""

New class of light wave discovered—29 January 2016

Physicists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), in collaboration with the University of Toronto and the University of York, have made a remarkable discovery that opens up future applications in many areas such as in precision laser surgery, imaging devices, and ultrafast computing and communication technology.

""

Innovation in elder-care on the horizon—21 January 2016

Supported by an ARC grant Professor Ingrid Zukerman and her team are working on a non-intrusive home monitoring device, which sends out alerts to carers in the case of abnormally long periods of inactivity.

""

Small but deadly: The chemical warfare of sea slugs—20 January 2016

New research, partly supported by ARC funding, has found that brightly coloured sea slugs are slurping deadly chemicals and stockpiling the most toxic compounds for use on their enemies.

""

Hyper dots: The next breakthrough for bio-imaging, diagnostics, and nanomedicine—11 January 2016

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale Biophotonics and the University of Technology, Sydney, have discovered new tools that could change how cancers and brain diseases, such as dementia and Parkinson’s disease are treated in the future.

""

Research raises concerns about long-term use of chromium diet pills—11 January 2016

Concerns have been raised about the long-term use of nutritional supplements containing chromium, after researchers, supported by ARC funding, found the mineral is partially converted into a carcinogenic form when it enters cells. 

""

How pigs are helping researchers tackle antibiotic resistance—8 January 2016

Research supported by ARC funding  at the University of Technology, Sydney, is tackling the growing health crisis of antibiotic resistance at its most significant source—the farmyard.

""

Ancient gas cloud may be a relic from the death of first stars—8 January 2016

Researchers from Swinburne University of Technology (supported through the ARC Discovery Projects scheme) and the USA have discovered a distant, ancient cloud of gas that may contain the signature of the very first stars that formed in the Universe. 

""

Amazing New Year’s Eve gift for fireball researchers—6 January 2016

Curtin University’s Desert Fireball Network team has successfully recovered a recently fallen meteorite from Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre in outback South Australia.

""

New sensor to aid IVF—4 January 2016

Research from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) could enable the tricky process of monitoring early-stage embryos during the IVF process to become much easier. Researchers have developed a new fibre-optic sensor that can measure concurrently, hydrogen peroxide and pH (acidity-alkalinity concentrations) in solution.

2015

December











decorative

Scientists a step closer to turning plants into medicine factories—18 December 2015

Researchers from La Trobe University and The University of Queensland have taken an important step towards the holy grail of making cheaper and better medicines using plants rather than existing industrial processes.

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 Australian cities critical for threatened wildlife—16 December 2015

New research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) reveals that Australian cities still retain a remarkable number of threatened species.

""

Bush up in the back paddock adds value to the farm—14 December 2015

New research from the University of Western Australia and the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has found native vegetation can add between 4% and 25% to the value of a rural property.

A focus on fatty eggs and fertility—10 December 2015

Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) into fat levels in oocytes (immature ova or eggs) has the potential to transform IVF practice, benefiting the dairy industry and also women seeking assisted reproductive treatment.

Young scientist becomes first Australian to receive photonics award—9 December 2015

An ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awardee is the first Australian researcher to be awarded the prestigious IEEE Photonics Society Young Investigator Award.

Telstra matches $10m CBA pledge for quantum computer race—8 December 2015

The University of New South Wales’s flagship quantum computing project at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology has received a second major injection of funds from Australia’s corporate sector, with Telstra matching a Commonwealth Bank pledge of $10 million support over the next five years

decorative

Major shortfalls identified in marine conservation—3 December 2015

A new study by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has found that more than 17 000 marine species worldwide remain largely unprotected.

World failing to protect its migratory bird—3 December 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have called for a greater international collaborative effort to save the world’s migratory birds, many of which are at risk of extinction due to loss of habitat along their flight paths.

Deadly blessing?—2 December 2015

Researchers based at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging have solved the X-ray crystal structure of the lethal factor present in stonefish venom

Climate impacting on trees—1 December 2015

Climate change and extreme climatic events appear to be killing trees around the world. ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awardee, Dr Melanie Zeppel, from Macquarie University suggests these changes in climate are also reducing tree growth and health.

November









New agreement to open the door to next generation cell therapies—24 November 2015

Breakthrough technology uncovered by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), will be a part of a new collaboration between Macquarie University and clinical-stage regenerative medicine company Regeneus.

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‘Good’ mozzie virus might hold key to fighting human disease—18 November 2015

Researchers from The University of Queensland and The University of Sydney, with ARC Discovery Projects funding, have discovered a new virus carried by one of the country’s most common pest mosquitoes.

decorative

Researchers uncover how some coral can survive annual bleaching events—18 November 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in collaboration with The University of Western Australia’s Oceans Institute and other research bodies, have found that coral with high levels of fat or other energy reserves can withstand the impact of annual coral bleaching events, compared to coral with lower levels of fat reserves.

 

Smart sensor detects single molecule in chemical compounds—16 November 2015

Australian and Italian researchers, assisted by ARC funding, have developed a smart sensor that can detect single molecules in chemical and biological compounds—a highly valued function in medicine, security and defence.

Decorative

 Laureate Fellow discusses research programme with European University Institute—11 November 2015

ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellow, Professor Anne Orford, was recently interviewed by the President of the European University Institute discussing her Laureate Fellowship in the area of Civil war, intervention and international law.

decorative

Australian researchers take on G20 challenge to make energy efficient wheat—6 November 2015

A team of Australian researcher from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology will contribute to a G20 nations’ plan to strengthen future global food security by making more energy efficient wheat.

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USQ-led team cements ARC Discovery funding—6 November 2015

Receiving a boost through ARC funding, a project led by the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) will look at how to make fly ash produced by coal-fired power stations into ‘green’ cement.

decorative

Scarlet fever making a comeback—4 November 2015

An international study lead by researchers from The University of Queensland, and supported by ARC funding, have tracked the re-emergence of a childhood disease which had largely disappeared over the past 100 years.


 

October












Cell colour in nose helps distinguish a genetic disease—30 October 2015

 Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have found that the colour of neuronal cells in the nose can be used to diagnose a rare genetic disorder called MELAS syndrome, which can result in stroke and dementia.

 Distressed damsels cry for help—29 October 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University have found that fish release a chemical ‘distress call’ when caught by predators, dramatically boosting their chances of survival.

Making heads and tails of embryo development: lessons from the humble fruit fly—28 October 2015

 

Long-standing question has now been answered by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging: how a growth factor in the fly embryo is controlled to determine where the head and tail form.

UNSW academics named as top Women of Influence—16 October 2015

Researchers at The University of New South Wales, Scientia Professors, ARC Future Fellow, Jane McAdam and ARC Australian Laureate Fellow, Veena Sahajwalla, have been named among Australia's 2015 Top 10 Women of Influence.

Echo-less light observed for first time—13 October 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) have been experimenting on creating special states of light that have no echoes.

Scientists pave way for diamonds to trace early cancer—12 October 2015

Physicists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems based at The University of Sydney, have devised a way to use diamonds to target tumours before they become life threatening.

Third UON Laureate Professor named NSW Scientist of the Year—7 October 2015

Eminent University of Newcastle (UON) geotechnical engineer, and ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor Scott Sloan, has been named the 2015 New South Wales' Scientist of the Year at the inaugural NSW Premier's Prizes for Science and Engineering.

Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing—6 October 2015

A team of Australian engineers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology has built a quantum logic gate in silicon for the first time.

Turning T Cell immunology on its head—5 October 2015

Challenging a universally accepted, longstanding consensus in the field of immunity requires hard evidence—and new research from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging has shown the proof is in the picture.

New technology enables people to take own blood samples at home—2 October 2015

ASTech, the ARC Training Centre for Portable Analytical Separation Technologies has developed a world-first device called the hemaPEN™ that allows people to collect an uncontaminated and precise volume of their own blood for testing at home.

Latest ARC grant to help save the northern quoll—1 October 2015

Saving the northern quoll from extinction is the focus of a new research project supported by the ARC. Dr Jonathan Webb, a wildlife ecologist from the University of Technology, Sydney, received a 2015 Linkage Projects grant of $337 775 for his project Preventing and Reversing Population Declines of Northern Quolls.

 

September





















‘Zero Hunger’ a global goal for Western Australian researcher—30 September 2015

Dr Laura Boykin, Research Fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology recently spoke to world leaders at the United Nations Headquarters in New York  about how her research will play a role in tackling the Global Goal of ‘zero hunger’.

Social media at bedtime linked to poor sleep and poor mental health for teens—29 September 2015

New ARC-funded research undertaken at Murdoch University—in collaboration with Griffith University—suggests teenagers with high social media use at bedtime suffer disturbed sleep, which in turn leads to depressed mood.

 

""

Scientists propose polar protection plan—28 September 2015

International scientists, including researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED), have proposed a new pathway for saving the Arctic and Antarctic from environmental challenges.

Image of a Tasmanian devil being released into the wild. Image courtesy Simon de Salis at DPIPWE/Save the Tasmanian Devil Programme.

World first: trial of Tasmanian Devil vaccine begins in the wild—26 September 2015

Researchers from the University of Tasmania, supported by ARC funding, have released 19 immunised Tasmanian devils into Narawntapu National Park, marking an important point in the quest to save the devil from extinction.

Image of Professor Jolanda Jetten from The University of Queensland. Image courtesy The University of Queensland.

Jolanda buoyed by 'wonderful honour'—24 September 2015

ARC Future Fellow, Professor Jolanda Jetten from The University of Queensland, will be formally inducted into the Academy of Social Sciences (ASSA) in Australia in November for her research into social identity and group dynamics.

Ultrathin lens could revolutionise next-gen devices—23 September 2015

Researchers at Swinburne University of Technology in collaboration with Monash University and supported by ARC funding, have developed an ultrathin, flat, ultra-lightweight graphene oxide optical lens with unprecedented flexibility

 New Australia-China centre to foster astronomy—21 September 2015

Australia and China have established a new joint research centre in astronomy that will boost Antarctic astronomy and facilitate cooperation on future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array.

Cochlear STEMSmart UNSW Science 50 50 Event—21 September 2015

A new initiative, supported by the ARC, inspiring young women to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) has provided students with a ‘hands-on’ opportunity in STEM knowledge.

Invention: futuristic alloys three times stronger than steel—18 September 2015

ARC-funded materials scientists from the University of New South Wales have created an ‘instruction manual’ for developing metallic glass—an ultra-tough yet flexible alloy described as the most significant materials science innovation since plastic.

No Yolk! Colin Raston uncooks egg, wins Ig Nobel!!—18 September 2015

Professor Colin Raston, who made global headlines by unboiling an egg has been honoured with an Ig Nobel prize. This ARC-funded scientist and his team are transforming the field of medicine and more with their major scientific breakthrough.

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Wildlife friendly cities will make us happier and healthier—17 September 2015

It is well known that interaction with our local environment benefits our physical and mental health. A new paper from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) outlines four key ways to protect biodiversity in our cities and towns through managing urban sprawl, enhancing green space, preserving large trees and engaging the community.

Work of accomplished mid-career plant researcher recognised by the UWA Vice-Chancellor—15 September 2015

An ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology researcher has been awarded the 2015 University of Western Australia Vice-Chancellor's Mid-Career Research Award.  

Sea Cucumber in the Western Pacific

New study tackles conflicting goals in the Coral Triangle—15 September 2015

An international team including researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has used one of the world’s natural wonders—the Coral Triangle of Southeast Asia—to pioneer a new approach that conserves wildlife, protects people’s livelihoods and helps both adapt to climate.

Atomic Destruction: How smog affects the lungs—15 September 2015

We all know smog affects us but new research from the University of Melbourne has for the first time given us a glimpse as to what might happen when smog reacts with lung proteins.

Jamming with toddlers trumps hitting the books—15 September 2015

According to University of Queensland research, playing music with toddlers could benefit their development even more than shared reading. 

 

Researchers test speed of light with greater precision than before—14 September 2015

In research supported by the ARC, researchers from The University of Western Australia and Humboldt University of Berlin have completed testing that has effectively measured the spatial consistency of the speed of light with a precision ten times greater than ever before. 

ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology logo graphic image courtesy: Eyecue Design

Plant energy biology researchers dominant amongst authors of influential science—11 September 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology have featured heavily in a list of most cited authors released by The American Society of Plant Biologists.

Bones of Homo naledi. Image courtesy: National Geographic appearing in October 2015 issue of National Geographic magazine.

New species emerges from the dark zone—10 September 2015

ARC-funded research at James Cook University (JCU) has played a role in a discovery that may alter the known history of humankind.

 

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Research finds trees can be at risk if mining alters groundwater levels—8 September

ARC-funded research from Western Sydney University has found open-cut mines that modify groundwater levels can impact ecosystems outside official boundaries, raising questions about their full ecological effects.

 ARC CEED Chief Investigator takes out 2015 Women in Technology award—2 September 2015

Congratulations to ARC Future Fellow, Associate Professor Kerrie Wilson from The University of Queensland (UQ), awarded the 2015 Life Sciences Research Award at the Women in Technology awards, acknowledging the significant influence of her research on international conservation policy. 

August










 Image of Monash Universoty logo

Guiding the sustainable development of the Peel-Harvey—27 August 2015

In a new ARC Linkage project, a multidisciplinary team of researchers led by Murdoch University will be investigating how best to develop the Western Australian Peel region without unduly impacting the health of the iconic Peel-Harvey estuary.

grapes on a vine

Grape waste could make competitive biofuel—20 August 2015

The solid waste left over from wine-making could make a competitive biofuel, according to researchers from The University of Adelaide.

 

Damselfish

New research looks at how coral reef fish 'talk' to each other—19 August 2015

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, supported by ARC funding, have been studying the unique communication methods of young coral reef fish to learn more about how animals ‘talk’ to each other.

Anne Orphord and Aidan Byrne

Should foreign countries intervene in civil wars?—8 August 2015

The University of Melbourne’s Professor Anne Orford—awarded the ARC 2015 Kathleen Fitzpatrick Australian Laureate Fellowship—will use her $2.5 million research grant to explore the complex legal issues surrounding intervention by external actors in civil wars.

crop of corn

When is the price right for selling water?—7 August 2015

An ARC Future Fellow has provided new insights into how Australian farmers and irrigators may respond to certain market conditions, and when they are more likely to sell their water entitlements.

IPBES chooses young fellows from CEED—6 August 2015

Vanessa Adams and Sugeng Budiharta are two early-career conservation scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at The University of Queensland. 

Dr Chunle Xiong

Phones and computers a step closer to being more secure—6 August 2015

Physicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at The University of Sydney have developed a photonic chip that is able to communicate information more securely and is small enough to fit most computers.

Dr Martin Breed

Tall Poppy Awards—4 August 2015

Congratulations to ARC DECRA Fellow, Dr Martin Breed, for receiving a 2015 Tall Poppy Award. Dr Breed is developing conservation and restoration solutions from studying plant adaptation and community ecology.

ACES staff in the lab

Brain teaser: 3D-printed ‘tissue’ to help combat disease—3 August 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) based at the University of Wollongong have developed a 3D-printed layered structure, incorporating neural cells, that mimics the structure of brain tissue. 

July

 













Barley on a spoon

Researchers uncover key to barley domestication—31 July 2015

An international team of researchers, including the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls at The University of Adelaide, have unlocked the genetic key in barley that led to the start of cropping in human agriculture. 

leaf of a small plant

Stressed out plants send animal-like signals—29 July 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at The University of Adelaide have shown for the first time that—despite not having a nervous system—plants use signals normally associated with animals when they encounter stress.

fish swimming

Fishy sunscreen—28 July 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls are investigating an all new sunscreen made from fish slime, algae and crustacean shells.

Dr Caitlin Byrt in the lab

Tall Poppy for passionate plant scientist—28 July

Plant scientist and ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Awardee, Dr Caitlyn Byrt, has been named a 2015 South Australian Tall Poppy.

Professor Ladislav Mucina

UWA project to tap into millions of years of plant history—23 July 2015

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, supported by an ARC Linkage project, will look at ‘plant communities’ that took millions of years to assemble, to try to understand the mechanisms allowing them to persist for such a long time. 

Blue light image

Shrimp’s ‘scary’ blue light helps scientists—23 July 2015

Researchers at The University of Western Australia, funded by an ARC Linkage project, have found that an enzyme squirted out of deep sea shrimp causing a bright blue burst to scare away predators is the key to innovative scientific work to develop new therapies for serious human diseases.

Family

Confidence keeps new parents strong21 July 2015

New research, supported by the ARC, at the University of Technology, Sydney, is identifying the most effective ways parenting services help families to build confidence and resilience through learning new skills.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Advance Molecular Imaging logo

Caught on camera: the first glimpse of powerful nanoparticles—17 July 2015

Researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence (CoE) for Advanced Molecular Imaging have announced an all-new and innovative hybrid method used to capture the 3D structures of nanocrystals.

Researcher Malachy Maher in the lab

Studying for a job that doesn’t exist…yet!—15 July 2015

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science is running a new PhD program for a future job that probably doesn’t exist yet, in a field that's set to take off.

Grapes

Making the most out of wine waste product—13 July 2015

Innovative new research at the ARC Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production aims to turn waste from the wine making process into a sustainable industry.

Dog

Optical ‘dog’s nose’ may hold key to breath analysis—7 July 2015

Researchers from The University of Adelaide, with support from the ARC, are developing a laser system for fast, non-invasive, onsite breath analysis, potentially enabling screening for a range of diseases including diabetes, infections and various cancers in the future.

mobile phone

Tablet technology to help children with autism—6 July 2015

Researchers at Monash University, funded through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, in collaboration with DreamWorks, have developed the world’s first tablet technology designed to assist children with developmental disabilities such as autism and Down Syndrome.

June

 










Dr Kathy Townsend

UQ projects win Healthy Waterways awards—23 June 2015

Researchers at The University of Queensland (UQ), funded through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, have highlighted the devastating impact of marine rubbish on wildlife, taking out the;2015 Healthy Waterways Research Award.

CEED Logo

Conservation research efforts recognised—23 June 2015

ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) researchers have won a prestigious Thomson Reuters Citation Award for their significant contribution to climate research.

Tomonori Hu

Australian scientists launch commercial enterprise in Europe—20 June 2015

The ARC Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) has launched a new commercial arm as part of a strategy employed by the centre to help contribute to a robust high tech industry in Australia.

Frog in the wild

Frog wars: survivors emerge in war with killer fungus—18 June 2015

Scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have found that some native frogs are winning their war against the world’s most devastating frog-killer—the chytrid fungus—while others are losing it.

Nemo fish swimming

Sediment makes it harder for baby Nemo to breathe easy—17 June 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have discovered that suspended sediment damages fish gills and can increase the rate of disease in fish.

Shark swimming

Shark deterrent research reveals interesting results—17 June 2015

Researchers from The University of Western Australia (UWA), supported by ARC funding, will continue their research into automatic shark detection and deterrents

researcher holding transparent, flexible sensors

Stretchy sensors can detect deadly gases and UV radiation—10 June 2015
RMIT University researchers, supported by ARC funding, have created wearable sensor patches that detect harmful UV radiation and dangerous, toxic gases such as hydrogen and nitrogen dioxide.

Great Barrier Reef Coral

Barrier Reef marine reserves combat coral disease—2 June 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef reduce the prevalence of coral diseases.

Dr Dhanisha Jhaveri in the lab

Research solves mystery of memory and mood—1 June 2015

Researchers at The University of Queensland (UQ), funded through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, are one step closer to understanding how the brain regulates memory and mood, thanks to the discovery of two distinct types of stem cells. 

May

 













 Rhonda Marriott

Indigenous researcher makes West Australian of the Year shortlist—28 May 2015

Aboriginal health researcher, Professor Rhonda Marriott from Murdoch University—funded by an ARC Discovery Indigenous grant—has been shortlisted as one of four finalists in the West Australian of the Year Aboriginal Award. 

smartphone

Use your smartphone for biosensing—26 May 2015

A research team from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) has shown that smartphones can be reconfigured as cost-effective, portable bioanalytical devices. 

ligo - machine

New era of astronomy as gravitational wave hunt begins—19 May 2015

Australian scientists, supported by the ARC, are in the hunt for the last missing piece of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, gravitational waves, as the Advanced LIGO Project in the United States comes on line. 

fishing boat

New way to save fish…and fishers!—18 May 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have found that well-enforced fishing areas can boost the incomes of fishers by up to 50 per cent through catching more fish, compared with those fishing in unregulated 'anything-goes' areas. 

Youtube still

Wellcome support for synthetic skin that instructs body how to repair itself—12 May 2015

ARC-supported research undertaken by The University of Sydney to develop a synthetic skin has received a $1 million Wellcome Trust Translation Fund Award.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science logo

Solution to corrosive ocean reveals our future climate—11 May 2015

World first research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science has explained the origin of an extremely corrosive ocean current that spread out from the Atlantic Ocean the last time global warming was seen as a result of carbon dioxide rises. 

drawing of brain

Nano memory cell can mimic the brain’s long-term memory—11 May 2015

Researchers at RMIT University, with support from an ARC Discovery Projects grant, have mimicked the way the human brain processes information.

Discussion session

Workshop sheds new light on Nanosafety—11 May 2015

During April 2015, the ARC Centre of Excellence on Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Techfwildnology at The University of South Australia (UniSA) held a workshop to explore the issue of ‘nanosafety’—the safe production and use of nanomaterials. 

Sun flower close up

Sunflower protein 'scissors' provide sunny news for medicine—8 May 2015

Researchers from The University of Western Australia and The University of Queensland have discovered an extraordinary protein-cutting enzyme that has also evolved to glue proteins together, a finding that may be valuable in the production of therapeutic drugs.

coral reef

‘Safe house’ discovery a new insight on reef ecology—7 May 2015

An international research collaboration including the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), supported by the ARC, has made a chance discovery that puts an entirely new perspective on the ecology of the microscopic plants that help drive coral reef formation. 

Koala

Celebrity species ‘can help save other wildlife’—6 May 2015

Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has revealed that charismatic or ‘celebrity’ endangered wildlife can help save less well-known or ‘forgotten’ animals—if the conservation funds are used wisely. 

Sandy Beach

Tropical marine ecosystems most at threat from human impact—1 May 2015

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies have used the 23-million-year fossil record to calculate which marine animals and ecosystems are most at risk of extinction today. 

April

 















Philip Roe, Dr Steven Salisbury and Linda Pollard

Race to record dinosaur tracks—29 April 2015

University of Queensland palaeontologists, with the support of an ARC Discovery Project grant, are using the latest scientific technology to capture new information that will help bring a 130-million-year-old dinosaur landscape back to life. 

Professor Emily Hilder

Your smartphone transformed into a mobile lab—29 April 2015

The ARC Training Centre for Portable Analytical Separation Technologies (ASTech) is a new University of Tasmania collaboration that promises to bring the complexities of in-house laboratory testing to the fingertips of those in the field.

Professor John Sader

Joining forces to reveal the mass and shape of single molecules—27 April 2015

Research supported by the ARC at The University of Melbourne has developed a revolutionary new technology that can image and weigh single molecules, to instantly identify a single virus particle or protein. 

coral trout fish

Fishing impacts on the Great Barrier Reef—22 April 2015

New research from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University shows that fishing is having a significant impact on the make-up of fish population of the Great Barrier Reef. 

Professor Matt King

Further insights into Antarctic’s ice sheet collapse—21 April 2015

ARC Future Fellow and accomplished researcher, Professor Matt King from the University of Tasmania, has delivered the Royal Society of London’s 2015 Kavli Lecture on estimating the rate of loss of land ice from Antarctica—work for which he has also been awarded the prestigious 2015 Kavli Medal.

scientists in the lab

Cancer drug shows promise as cure for hepatitis B—21 April 2015

Australian scientists from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research have found a potential cure for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. 

Researcher in the field

Big surprises underground for plant scientists—20 April 2015

Researchsupported by the ARC and led by The University of Western Australia, in conjunction with the University of Montreal (USA) has revealed some amazing plant kingdom secrets in the kwongan eco-region of Western Australia’s south-west. 

Koala crossing sign next to road

How smart roads can help koalas beat traffic—20 April 2015

A new study by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) reveals that expanding existing highways, instead of building new roads, is the best way to minimise the impact of increasing traffic and growing cities, on koalas. 

divers on the ocean floor

Massive kelp forest experiment to beat habitat loss—20 April 2015

Research supported by the ARC has allowed scientists at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) to transplant hundreds of kelp plants to artificial patch reefs in an experiment to test the resilience and stability of the important common kelp on Tasmania's sheltered east coast. 

oranguan in a tree

Collaboration “cansave forests and $billions”—15 April 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have urged the three nations who share the Asian island of Borneo to collaborate more closely to save their endangered wildlife and meet development goals.

 Electron wave in a phosphorus atom

Breakthrough opens doors to affordable quantum computers13 April 2015

A team of researchers led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has encoded quantum information in silicon using simple electrical pulses for the first time, bringing affordable large-scale quantum computers one step closer to reality.

 Anglo-Australian telescope at Siding Spring Observatory

Archaeology of a million stars to unravel galaxies’ evolution—9 April 2015

Research led by The University of Sydney and The Australian National University, supported by the Australian Research Council, is using archaeology to solve one of the fundamental mysteries of astronomy.

 Last will and testament document

Older Australians are willing but younger ones delay—7 April 2015

Through an ARC Linkage Project, The University of Queensland has partnered with  other Australian universities and public trustees to conduct a national study on legal wills.

 David Harrich in the lab

Next step for proposed HIV gene therapy—2 April 2015

Researchers at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute—funded through an ARC Future Fellowship and the National Health and Medical Research Council—are about to commence pre-clinical trials of a genetic treatment to permanently suppress HIV (human immunodeficiency virus).

March

 






ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls logo

Barley research expected to help beer brew better—27 March 2015

A joint research initiative involving the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls and Carlton & United Breweries will investigate the impact of barley quality on key attributes of the brewing process and beer quality.

Professor Capasso

Inventor of Quantum Cascade Laser delivers only public talk at The University of Sydney—19 March 2015

Over 180 people filled the Charles Perkins Auditorium at The University of Sydney on 17 March to hear Harvard Professor Federico Capasso’s only major public talk in Australia.

Professor Len Collard in a field

Do you live in the place of spiders—18 March 2015

Want to know more about the Noongar origins of the name of your street, suburb or town? A new website developed by researchers at The University of Western Australia and Curtin University might help. The project, funded through the ARC Discovery Indigenous scheme, is called Boodjar—meaning country.

An artist’s impression of the electrode

Clean energy future: new cheap and efficient electrode for splitting water—18 March 2015

Scientists from The University of New South Wales (UNSW), including ARC Research Fellow Associate Professor Chuan Zhao, have developed a highly efficient oxygen-producing electrode for splitting water that has the potential to be scaled up for industrial production of the clean energy fuel, hydrogen.

CUDOS researchers

Breakthrough in nonlinear optic research—5 March 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) have developed a method to selectively enhance or inhibit optical nonlinearities in a chip-scale device.

February

 








Xinhua Wu with the 3D printed engine 

The world’s first printed jet engine—26 Feburary 2015

Researchers at the ARC Research Hub for Transforming Australia’s Manufacturing Industry through High Value Additive Manufacturing have printed a jet engine. 

Great barrier reef

Great Barrier Reef corals eat plastic—24 February 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University have found that corals commonly found on the Great Barrier Reef will eat micro-plastic pollution.

Protein-laden coil wraps around the hydrogel channel

Spinal cord repair one step closer with discovery of the ‘go’ signal for nerve re-growth—11 February 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong, working in collaboration with the University of Texas, have found the ‘go’ signal that encourages nerve cell growth to repair nerve damage and spinal cord injuries in people.

Honey Bee

Why stressed young bees’ early start to foraging can lead to colony collapse—10 February 2015

An international team of scientists, including ARC Future Fellow, Dr Andrew Barron (Macquarie University), believe they may have worked out why bee colonies globally have been collapsing.

chalk drawing of greek letter “psi”

Quantum reality check—9 February 2015

Research supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems and Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at The University of Queensland has made major progress in answering a long-standing dilemma in quantum mechanics: Is Schrödinger’s cat really alive and dead at the same time?

animated carnivorous mushrooms

Carnivorous mushrooms reveal human immune trick—6 February 2015

Edible oyster mushrooms have an intriguing secret: they eat spiders and roundworms. 

 ARC Centre for Advanced Molecular Imaging logo

A titanic electron microscope that snap-freezes cells to reveal immune secrets—2 February 2015

A unique $5m electron microscope at Monash University will transform the way we view the human immune system, and advance Australian research towards better treatment for diseases from cancer and malaria to diabetes, rheumatism and multiple sclerosis.

January

 










baby

Babies' brains could unravel the mystery of stuttering—30 January 2014

University of Sydney researchers are launching a world-first study to see if it's possible to detect whether a baby will go on to stutter in later life—well before they start to talk.

wormhole in space

Black holes follow the rules—27 January 2015

Research at Swinburne University of Technology has shown that it is possible to predict the masses of black holes in galaxies for which it was previously thought not possible.

telescope beaming signal

Cosmic Radio burst caught red-handed—19 January 2015

In research supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) and using CSIRO’s 64-metre Parkes radio telescope in eastern Australia, Swinburne University of Technology PhD student Emily Petroff has for the first time seen a ‘fast radio burst’—a short, sharp flash of radio waves from an unknown source—happening live.

coral reef

Predicting coral reef futures under climate change—15 January 2015

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies examining the impact of climate change on coral reefs have found a way to predict which reefs are likely to recover following bleaching episodes and which won’t. 

pile of soy beans

Research finds salt tolerance gene in soybean—8 January 2015

A collaborative research project between Australian and Chinese scientists, supported by the ARC, has shown how soybean can be bred to better tolerate soil salinity.

Dr Thomas Haselhorst and Professor Mark von Itzstein

Unveiling how rotavirus causes infection—6 January 2015

Researchers from Griffith University’s Institute for Glycomics and The University of Melbourne have significantly advanced understanding of a virus that kills up to half a million children each year.

Sugar glider hanging from tree

Scientists race to save ‘books’ in the burning ‘library of life—5 January 2015

As species blink into extinction all around the world, environmental scientists in Australia have come up with a way to decide ‘which of the books we rescue from the blazing library of life’.

lady smoking

Does bad behaviour run in the family?—5 January 2015

University of Queensland research aims to answer the age-old question of whether anti-social behaviour is passed down through families.

International year of light logo

Spectacular Sydney Fireworks mark the beginning of International Year of Light—2 January 2015

A giant lightbulb that illuminated the Sydney Harbour Bridge shortly after midnight on 1 January 2015, kicked off the International Year of Light (IYL) and Light-based technologies.

2014

December











Lauren Boykin walking in a field

TED Fellowship for Australian computational biologist—18 December 2014

Research Fellow Laura Boykin has been named as the only Australia-based TED Fellow for 2015

Miao Du onlaptop

New artificial intelligence technology for service virtualisation—18 December 2014

PhD student Miao Du has redefined service virtualisation technology resulting in the invention of a new process called opaque data processing.

James Warren headshot

Study of pearling trade to shed light on cultural histories of the material world—16 December 2014

The historical and cultural importance of the international pearling industry is the focus of a new study ARC-funded Discovery Project at Murdoch University.

crown fish

Snail scent scares pest starfish—15 December 2014

Scientists at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) have found that the scent of a rare giant sea snail terrifies the crown-of-thorns starfish.

Dr Jenny Wang in the lab

Cancer stem cells could be easier to target following world-first discovery by Australian researchers—12 December 2014

Children’s Cancer Institute researchers have made a world-first in discovering new properties essential to drug-resistant tumour cells that could revolutionise cancer treatment and reduce the side-effects of chemotherapy.

Harleguin filefish

You are what you eat—if you’re a coral reef fish—10 December 2014

In a world first study researchers have found a coral-eating fish that disguises its smell to hide from predators.

distant galaxies

Astronomers see atomic hydrogen emission in galaxies at record breaking distances—3 December 2014

Using the world’s largest radio telescope, astronomers from Swinburne University of Technology have detected the faint signal emitted by atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies three billion light years from Earth, breaking the previous record distance by 500 million light years.

Michelle Simmons in the lab

Commonwealth Bank invests $5m in quantum computing—2 December 2014

The ARC Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology(link is external), based at The University of New South Wales set to receive $5 million in funding from the Commonwealth Bank (CBA) to help researchers in their quest to build a silicon-based quantum computer.

Vijay Sivaraman holding phone

Wearable technology may bring health data to doctors—2 December 2014

Researchers at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) are working to produce new ‘wearable’ consumer devices that can monitor health and fitness, and possibly become an important source of information for medical practitioners and insurance providers.

the prosecution project logo

The Prosecution Project—1 December 2014

A new ARC-funded project digitising the registers of Supreme Court cases will help determine patterns of crime, prosecution and punishment over an extensive period of time (1850 to 1960).

November

 





Bionic bra

World-first ‘bionic bra’ inches closer to reality—27 November 2014

Work first started on the Bionic Bra more than fifteen years ago. However, technology is only starting to catch up with the researchers' imaginations. Professor Gordon Wallace, Executive Research Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science based at University of Wollongong, said the Bionic Bra team has recently discovered new actuators and sensing technologies that will bring the bra to life.

Researcher in the lab

Brain building with stem cells—24 November 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) are undertaking ‘disease modelling’ to build brain tissue with living human stem cells that will help us better understand, and ultimately treat, neural diseases like schizophrenia.

Professor Shari Forbes

Research facility will help solve murder investigations—18 November 2014

A unique, ARC-funded research facility will improve understanding of how human remains decompose and help police with missing persons and homicide investigations.

Invasive weeds in the Adelaide Hills

Plant library takes on the global weeds menace—12 November 2014

At-risk native plants worldwide have gained a new ally in their losing battle against aggressive and insidious feral weeds.

 

 

 October












koala climbing up a tree

Researchers celebrate koala chlamydia breakthrough—29 October 2014
Scientists at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) are celebrating the world's first successful field trial of a vaccine against chlamydia in koalas.

Clown Fish

Sediment impacts on fish larvae—23 October 2014
Sediments associated with dredging and flood plumes could have a significant impact on fish populations by extending the time required for the development of their larvae, according to Australian researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University.

X-29 airplane

1980s aircraft helps quantum technology take flight—20 October 2014
Over several years, a team of researchers at the ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems at The University of Sydney has taken inspiration from aerospace research and development programs to make unusually shaped experimental aircraft fly.

Epaulette shark

Sheltering habits help sharks cope with acid oceans—16 October 2014
Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University have found that the epaulette shark, a species that shelters within reefs and copes with low oxygen levels, is able to tolerate increased carbon dioxide in the water without any obvious physical impact.

Professor Veena Sahajwall and Paul Vielhauer

'Green steel' technology saves two million tyres from landfill—16 October 2014
'Green steel' technology invented at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has achieved a major milestone, with its use in Australia preventing more than two million waste rubber tyres from ending up in landfill.

colourful hands

Why don’t Aussies volunteer?—14 October 2014
The reasons why Aussies volunteer, and the benefits they bring to society, are well known.

drawing of an electron wave function

Australian teams set new records for silicon quantum computing—13 October 2014
Two research teams working in the same laboratories at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) have found distinct solutions to a critical challenge that has held back the realisation of super powerful quantum computers.

bilby in the dirt

Split reserves increase bilby’s survival chance—13 October 2014
Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) has revealed that establishing entirely new fenced areas, rather than expanding existing ones, will provide better long term protection for highly vulnerable animals—such as the endangered bilby—against feral cats, dogs and foxes, diseases, or catastrophes such as fires and floods.

Dr Nicolas Talyor

Exploring Plant Metabolism and Adaptation to Environmental Extremes—10 October 2014
Read about the work being performed by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology's ARC Future Fellow Dr Nicolas Taylor in the October 2014 edition of International Innovation.

rock art in a cave

Rock art discovery paints new human history—9 October 2014 
Researchers from Griffith University have discovered cave paintings from the Indonesian island of Sulawesi are at least 40 thousand years old.

3D BioPrinting

New eBook launched - 3D BioPrinting: Printing Parts for Bodies—2 October 2014
A new eBook, 3D BioPrinting: Printing Parts for Bodies, released this week tells the story of the impending 3D printing revolution in medicine.

 

 September













Murray Rowland

Bionic Vision Australia successfully completes clinical trial of implant in retinitis pigmentosa—30 September 2014
Bionic Vision Australia (BVA)—a consortium of researchers working together to develop bionic eye devices to restore a sense of vision to people with profound vision loss—has announced the successful completion of the first clinical trial of its prototype 24-channel percutaneous implant in patients with profound vision loss from the eye disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

Dr Barry Cayford in a sewer

Sewer technology brings global honour for UQ-led team—25 September 2014 
A University of Queensland-led research team that is radically improving sewer design and management has won a prestigious international prize in Portugal.

Professor Khin Zaw

Researchers unlock the mineral riches of SE Asia—22 September 2014
Research being carried out at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES) at the University of Tasmania is helping mining companies pinpoint mineral-rich ore deposits in previously unexplored areas of South East Asia.

mantis shrimp

Elegant and efficient vision systems can detect cancer—22 September 2014
Mantis shrimp eyes are inspiring the design of new cameras that can detect a variety of cancers and visualise brain activity.

Clown fish

Nemo's Epic Journey to Find a New Home—19 September 2014 
New research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral COE) at James Cook University has found clownfish larvae can swim up to 400 kilometres in search of a home, which makes them better able to cope with environmental change.

Museum Victoria's 100,000 object data browser

iCinema leads development of mARChive with Museum Victoria—19 September 2014
The icinema Centre for Interactive Cinema Research at The University of New South Wales has developed an interactive digital browser that is essentially a giant cinema allowing visitors to browse through rarely seen collections.

Professor Mark Kendall

Nanopatch to help WHO battle polio—17 September 2014
The World Health Organisation's (WHO) battle against polio has a new weapon with agreed research collaborations with Vaxxas, the biotechnology company responsible for developing the 'Nanopatch', a revolutionary vaccine delivery method.

person scuba diving

Eureka! Reef Life team wins major science prize—11 September 2014
A University of Tasmania (UTAS) team, supported by funding through the ARC, has been awarded the 2014 Eureka Prize for Environmental Research.

universe

Three eyes on the sky track laws of Nature 10 billion years ago—10 September 2014
An international team of astronomers, led by researchers from Swinburne University of Technology, have focused the three most powerful optical telescopes in the world on a single point in the sky to test one of Nature's fundamental laws.

3D-printed fibre-reinforced hydrogel

Toughening up hydrogels for 3D printed cartilage—9 September 2014
A researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) based at the University of Wollongong has developed a way to 3D-print tough, fibre-reinforced hydrogels that mimic the strength and suppleness of human cartilage.

wine in wine wrack

Aussies' take on alcohol warning labels—5 September 2014
A team of Australian researchers led by Flinders University's Dr Emma Miller are now asking consumers how they would react if their favourite bottle of bubbly or brand of beer was emblazoned with the glaring warning: Alcohol causes cancer!

plant in an office

Leafy-green better than lean—1 September 2014
An office enriched with plants makes staff happier and boosts productivity by 15%, a University of Queensland (UQ) researcher has found.

 

 August








Swinburn University of Technology logo

Policy Online Wins 2014 Australia and New Zealand Internet Awards—28 August 2014
Policy Online, based at Swinburne University of Technology, has won the Information category in the 2014 Australian and New Zealand Internet Awards(link is external) (ANZIA).

fish swimming

Gene genies to combat invasive pest fish species—27 August 2014
The University of Tasmania will lead a collaborative effort to rid waterways around Australia of the Eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), introduced 100 years ago to combat malaria.

Dr Julianne O'Reilly-Wapstra

Pine plantation puzzle puts researchers on wallaby trail—27 August 2014 
Research by the University of Tasmania has found that some of Tasmania's wallabies have developed a taste for plantation pine, and they are causing significant damage to growing plants in some places. 

Associate Professor Andrea Morello

The Quantum around You—26 August 2014
Associate Professor Andrea Morello from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at The University of New South Wales stars in a new YouTube series about quantum phenomena.

bunch of grapes

Vines, Wine and Identity—25 August 2014
Australians are shifting from beer to wine, and now a University of Newcastle project is set to provide critical insight into what role the Hunter Valley has played in influencing this change.

Professor Matthew Nelson in a field

Canola flowers faster with heat genes—21 August 2014
A problem that has puzzled canola breeders for years has been solved by researchers from The University of Western Australia (UWA)—and the results could provide a vital breakthrough in understanding the impact of increasing global temperatures on crop flowering.

Researchers Negar Zanjani and Dr Peter Valtchev in the lab

Seabed solution for cold sores—20 August 2014
The blue blood of abalone, a seabed delicacy could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus following breakthrough research at The University of Sydney.

 

July

 Sad and depressed boy in corner

Image: Sad and depressed boy in corner
Image credit: RobertHoetink
Image courtesy: iStock - 29528052

Breaking the cycle of disadvantage 
Media issued by the University of Queensland
31 July 2014

A new ARC Centre of Excellence based at The University of Queensland (UQ) is tackling the problem of deep and persistent disadvantage among children and families in Australia. The ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course (Life Course Centre) will be led by Professor Janeen Baxter from UQ's Institute for Social Science Research and will include leading Australian and international researchers from the Universities of Western Australia, Melbourne and Sydney as well as international experts from Harvard, Chicago, Singapore and Essex.

 

 

 launch of the new ACES

Image: ARC CEO Professor Aidan Byrne, UOW Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Judy Raper, Senator the Hon Concetta Fierravanti-Wells, UOW Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul Wellings and ACES Director Professor Gordon Wallace at the launch of the new ACES. 
Image courtesy: ACES

Funding to take discoveries to new dimensions 
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES)
31 July 2014

A new ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) with $25 million in Federal Government funding will see the University of Wollongong heading up an international materials research effort. ACES, which now brings together six Australian and five international partners, will embark on an ambitious program that will take materials science research, training, commercialisation and engagement programs into new dimensions through to 2020. ACES Director Professor Gordon Wallace said ACES will build on its internationally recognised fundamental research program to fast track the development of new industries and manufacturing opportunities around the next generation of batteries, solar cells and medical implants.

 

 Associate Professor Scott Croom

Image: Associate Professor Scott Croom (CAASTRO/University of Sydney) with the SAMI instrument during its construction. 
Photo credit: Tim Wheeler

Australian researchers pioneer a 'Google street view' of galaxies 
Media issued by The University of Sydney
23 July 2014

A new home-grown instrument based on bundles of optical fibres is giving Australian astronomers the first 'Google street view' of the cosmos—incredibly detailed views of huge numbers of galaxies. Developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) at the University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory, the optical-fibre bundles can sample the light from up to 60 parts of a galaxy, for a dozen galaxies at a time. By analysing the light's spectrum, astronomers can learn how gas and stars move within each galaxy, where the young stars are forming and where the old stars live. This will allow them to better understand how galaxies change over time and what drives that change. "It's a giant step," said Dr James Allen of CAASTRO. "Before, we could study one galaxy at a time in detail, or lots of galaxies at once but in much less detail. Now we have both the numbers and the detail."

 

  Stream Of Blood Cells

Image: Stream Of Blood Cells
Image credit: tigger11th.
Image courtesy: Image courtesy of tigger11th / FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

The fight against malaria 
Media issued by Monash University
17 July 2014

State-of-the-art military hardware could soon fight malaria, one of the most deadly diseases on the planet. Researchers at Monash University and the University of Melbourne have used an anti-tank Javelin missile detector, more commonly used in warfare to detect the enemy, in a new test to rapidly identify malaria parasites in blood. Scientists say the novel idea could set a new gold standard for malaria testing. Researchers used a special imaging detector known as a Focal Plane Array (FPA) to detect malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. Originally developed for Javelin anti-tank heat seeking missiles, the FPA gives highly detailed information on a sample area in minutes. The heat-seeking detector, which is coupled to an infrared imaging microscope, allowed the team to detect the earliest stages of the malaria parasite in a single red blood cell. Lead researcher and ARC Future Fellow, Associate Professor Bayden Wood said that a test that can catch malaria at its early stages is critical to reduce mortality and prevent the overuse of antimalarial drugs.

 

 

orangutan

Image: Orangutan
Image credit: Kabir Bakie
Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Scientists urge greater efforts to protect orangutan forests 
Media issued by the ARC Centre of  Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED)
17 July 2014

Scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at the University of Queensland have established the best strategies for maintaining orangutan populations for more than 20 years on a limited budget. Researchers analysed which strategy or combination of strategies, and under what conditions, is the most cost‐effective at maintaining wild orangutan populations. "Money is limited in conservation, and it is important to know how best to spend it," said Dr Howard Wilson of CEED. "We found that the choice between habitat protection and rehabilitation depends on the cost of rehabilitation per orangutan and the rate of deforestation. If we want to maintain orangutan populations for less than 20 years, then reintroduction is best. But if we're aiming for long‐term species conservation, protecting their habitat is by far the best strategy."

 

 

 Atoms Apart by Anna Madeleine

Image: Atoms Apart by Anna Madeleine.
Image courtesy of the artist.

Insight Radical works return to London 
Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology
14 July 2014

Insight Radical artworks from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology have returned to London for an exhibition in July. The exhibition Art in Chemistry, Chemistry in Art will be held from 14–27 July 2014 at the Royal Society of Chemistry in London. Insight Radical was a Centre-led project involving artist residencies in the Centre's Melbourne laboratories during 2012, and exhibitions of works produced in response to these residencies in London, Sydney and Adelaide throughout 2013–2014. The project was supported by the Australian government through Inspiring Australia, Winsor & Newton, and Artist Profile.

 

 The giant gavel of justice at the Ohio Judicial Center

Image: The giant gavel of justice at the Ohio Judicial Center in downtown Columbus, Ohio
Image credit: Sam Howzit
Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons via Flickr 

Reducing incarceration using Justice Reinvestment: an exploratory case study 
Media issued by The Australian National University

7 July 2014

An ARC Discovery Indigenous research project led by the National Centre for Indigenous Studies (NCIS) at The Australian National University is researching the theory and methodology of Justice Reinvestment (JR). JR is a rethinking of the criminal justice system, whereby taxpayer funds are 'reinvested' into the community instead of being spent on imprisoning people for low-level criminal activity. JR retains detention as a measure of last resort. At a broad level, JR requires a shift in policy and social outlook from incarceration to non-incarceration, to reinvest the large sums of taxpayer money currently being spent in imprisoning people, back into the community. The project, using the NSW town of Cowra for the case study, will explore the conditions, governance and cultural appropriateness of re-investing resources otherwise spent on incarceration into services that enhance the ability of juvenile offenders to remain in their community—to reduce further criminal behaviours and health costs associated with incarceration.The research could potentially result in recommendations that will address the levels of young people (whether Indigenous or non-Indigenous) coming into contact with the criminal justice system.

 

 

 ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging

Image: Some members of the research team with the Crystalmation robot (which they use to make the protein crystals) at the Monash Macromolecular Crystallisation Facility (MMCF). L to R Dr Richard Berry, Dr Dene Littler, Mr Gautham Balaji (research assistant) and Mr Felix Deuss (PhD student)
Image credit: ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging

How viruses use 'fake' proteins to hide  in our cells 
Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging
 4 July 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging—at Monash and Melbourne Universities—have determined the basic structure of one of the two known families of the deceptive proteins. Some viruses can hide in our bodies for decades. They make 'fake' human proteins that trick our immune cells into thinking 'everything is awesome' and there is nothing to see. Using synchrotron light and working with a common virus that lives in people happily and for the most part harmlessly, they worked out the structure of the fake proteins. This is an important first step towards producing better vaccines and drugs to fight viral disease. The research was posted online this week by the Journal of Biological Chemistry. "Our work highlights how these viruses mimic the immune system in order to evade it," says Monash University's Dr Richard Berry, a senior author of the paper.

 

 

 Wheat

Image: Wheat
Image credit: Bluemoose
Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Boron tolerance discovery for higher wheat yields 
Media issued by the University of Adelaide
3 July 2014

University of Adelaide scientists have identified the genes in wheat that control tolerance to a significant yield-limiting soil condition found around the globe—boron toxicity. The identification of boron tolerance genes in wheat DNA is expected to help plant breeders more rapidly advance new varieties for increased wheat yields to help feed the growing world population. The researchers from the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) say that in soils where boron toxicity is reducing yields, genetic improvement of crops is the only effective strategy to address the problem. "About 35% of the world's seven billion people depend on wheat for survival," says project leader Dr Tim Sutton. "However productivity is limited by many factors such as drought, salinity and subsoil constraints including boron toxicity. Our identification of the genes and their variants responsible for this adaptation to boron toxicity means that we now have molecular markers that can be used in breeding programmes to select lines for boron tolerance with 100% accuracy." The ACPFG receives support from the ARC as a co-funded centre.

 

 Pre-teen girl being bullied by a group of mean girls

Image: Pre-teen girl being bullied by a group of mean girls
Image credit: Figure8Photos

Families can play key role against bullying
Media issued by The University of Queensland
1 July 2014

Research at The University of Queensland, supported by the ARC, has shown that families can be more effective in protecting children from bullying than school-based strategies alone.

The findings, to be published in the journal Behaviour Therapy show that parents can actively help their children reduce the impact of bullying.

The results of a randomised control trial of Resilience Triple P, show the program is more effective than efforts of school staff to address concerns about a particular child.

Resilience Triple P is a program for the families of children who are experiencing bullying by other children at school. The program was developed to help children and their parents make a positive difference to their child's situation.

Study author Karyn Healy said families who participated in the program reported that their children were bullied less and were much less emotionally distressed after the program.

 

 

May

 Barley and wheat growing at the saline GM field trial site at Corrigin

Image: Barley and wheat growing at the saline GM field trial site at Corrigin, WA.
Image courtesy: ACPFG

Technology for salty soils
Media issued by the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG)
16  May 2014

A new partnership between the University of Connecticut and the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) is improving the ability of cereal crops to grow in saline conditions. Soil salinity is a major issue for grain growers worldwide. In the United States it is estimated that yield reductions occur due to salinity on approximately 30 per cent of arable land, and in Australia, 67 per cent of all grain growing areas are affected by this environmental stress. The technology known as vacuolar pyrophosphates (AVP1) was developed at the University of Connecticut, and has now been licenced by the ACPFG and is showing positive signs in cereal crops grown at ACPFG's saline field trials. The ACPFG is jointly funded by the ARC and the Grains Research and Development Corporation.

 

CUDOS's Dr Darren Hudson speaks at the showcase.

Image:CUDOS's Dr Darren Hudson speaks to ARC Executive Director, Professor Brian Yates, during the showcase.
Image credit: Linnet Foto
Image courtesy: CUDOS

CUDOS research shines at showcase
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS)
15 May 2014

The ARC Centre of Excellence in Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems recently held a Photonics Showcase at the Australian Technology Park in Sydney to celebrate the many innovations in photonics that find industrial application from research. The aim of the showcase is to build links between researchers and those seeking the next industrial opportunity, and to provide educational resources to the teachers of the next generation of scientists, engineers, and users of photonics technology. CUDOS researchers exhibited a number of 'industry-ready' prototypes of their research including a quantum-based generator of random numbers, a laser source of mid-infrared light for sensing, a 3D nano-printer and photonic filters for applications from seeing through haze to descrambling microwave signals. You can read more about the showcase and the work of CUDOS in its showcase report now on the CUDOS website.

 

CCD stakeholders

Image: CCD stakeholders gather at their recent workshop in the Australian Hearing Hub. Photo credit: Effy Alexakis.
Image courtesy: Macquarie University

Workshop explores the future of cognitive science research
Media issued by Macquarie University
13 May 2014

Leaders from community organisations working in the areas of autism, learning difficulties, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, speech pathology and more, recently met with researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) to share their common vision and shape future research directions. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for CCD researchers to learn more about the practical needs of children and adults with cognitive health issues, and for community and industry leaders to discuss the potential impact of evidence-based research findings and treatment protocols for meeting the needs of the people they serve. CCD Director, Professor Stephen Crain, said the day enabled the Centre to "showcase some of the ways in which experimentation and technology can lead to future impacts, based on the methods of cognitive science".

 

 Graphene oxide non-linear film

Image:  Image courtesy: Swinburne University of Technology

Graphene photonics breakthrough promises fast-speed, low-cost communications
Media issued by Swinburne University of Technology
9 May 2014

Researchers have developed a high-quality continuous graphene oxide thin film that shows potential for ultrafast telecommunications. A team from Swinburne University of Technology's Centre for Micro-Photonics have created a micrometre-thin film with record-breaking optical nonlinearity—this makes the film suitable for high performance integrated photonic devices used in all-optical communications, biomedicine and photonic computing. "Such a laser patternable highly nonlinear thin film, about one hundredth of a human hair, has not been achieved by any other material," project leader Associate Professor Baohua Jia said. This project is funded through the ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award scheme.

 

 cows in field

Image courtesy: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Getting to the meat of animal welfare issues
Media issued by The University of Adelaide
7 May 2014

What are Australian consumers' key concerns about how livestock are treated, and how much are they willing to pay for 'ethically produced' meats? How will consumer values influence livestock industry and food retailer decisions, and ultimately impact what is available on supermarket shelves in the future?

These and other social and economic issues are the focus of a new ARC funded three-year research project now underway at the University of Adelaide in partnership with industry leaders, retailers and government.

 

  NCGRT  logo

Image courtesy: National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training

National  Water Bank proposed
Media issue by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT)
7 May 2014

A leading water scientist has proposed the development of a National Water Bank—a continent-wide replenishment scheme for underground reserves of fresh water—to help safeguard the nation from water scarcities for centuries to come.

The creation of a National Water Bank could do much to help Australia avoid future water shortages, according to Professor Craig Simmons, NCGRT Director.

The NCGRT is jointly funded by the ARC and the National Water Commission.

 

Radio wave emission from a pulsar

Image: Radio wave emission from a pulsar 
Image courtesy: Swinburne Astronomy Productions/CAASTRO

Galactic lens yields precision pulsar measurement
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO)
6 May 2014

An international team of astronomers, including scientists from the ARC Centre of a Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), have made a measurement of a distant neutron star that is one million times more precise than the previous world's best.

The researchers were able to use the interstellar medium, the 'empty' space between stars and galaxies that is made up of sparsely spread charged particles, as a giant lens to magnify and look closely at the radio wave emission from a small rotating neutron star.

CAASTRO is funded under the Australian Research Council Centres of Excellence scheme.

 

UNSW spelt out using an ionic liquid

Image: Salt on a chip—UNSW spelt out using an ionic liquid printed onto a gold surface about 1cm across.
Image credit: Dr Chuan Zhao

New lab-on-a-chip device overcomes miniaturisation problems
Media issued  by The University of New South Wales (UNSW)
1 May 2014

UNSW chemists, supported by an ARC Discovery Projects grant, have invented a new type of tiny lab-on-a-chip device that could have a diverse range of applications, including to detect toxic gases, fabricate integrated circuits and screen biological molecules.

The novel technique developed by the team involves printing a pattern of miniscule droplets of a special solvent onto a gold-coated or glass surface.

The research was carried out by Dr Zhao, Christian Gunawan and Mengchen Ge from the UNSW School of Chemistry.

 

 

Bauxity Residue sampling

Image: Bauxity Residue sampling Photographer: Mark Dobrowolski 
Image courtesy: The University of Western Australia

Breaking new ground on restoring healthy soil
Media issued by The University of Western Australia
1 May 2014

Through an ARC Linkage Projects grant, researchers from The University of Western Australia, working with Alcoa of Australia, are breaking new ground on finding ways to transform bauxite residue into healthy soils.

Rehabilitating bauxite residue is challenging because it's typically highly alkaline and saline, and contains very little organic matter, nutrients or microorganisms, all of which are vital ingredients for plants to grow.

The research team led by Dr Natasha Banning found that adding a combination of green waste compost and fertiliser to the bauxite residue sand improves its rehabilitation potential and its capacity to support plants.

 

  

April

 Goniastrea aspera releasing egg sperm bundles

Image: Goniastrea aspera releasing egg sperm bundles.
Image credit: Andrew Baird

More coral babies staying at home on future reefs
Media issued by The ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies
29 April 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University, have found that increasing ocean temperatures due to climate change will soon see reefs retaining and nurturing more of their own coral larvae, leaving large reef systems less interconnected and potentially more vulnerable.

"We found that at higher temperatures more coral larvae will tend to stay on their birth reef," says the lead author of the study published today, Dr Joana Figueiredo.

Professor Sean Connolly, also from the Coral CoE, explains that while more coral larvae will stay close to their parents, fewer will disperse longer distances, leaving reefs less connected.

 

 

 quantum

Image: Xanthe Croot and James Colless uncovered a way to study what happens when electrons in quantum dots interact with sound waves of the solid they are trapped in.
Image courtesy: The ARC Centre of Excellence in Engineered Quantum Systems Image credit: Professor David Reilly, The University of Sydney

Probing the sound of a quantum dot
Media issued by The University of Sydney
24 April 2014

Physicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS) and The University of Sydney's School of Physics have discovered a method of using microwaves to probe the sounds of a quantum dot—a promising platform for building a quantum computer.

PhD candidates, James Colless and Xanthe Croot,  uncovered a way to study what happens when electrons in quantum dots interact with sound waves of the solid they are trapped in.

 

 

Prof Simmons

Image: A "pioneer" in her field, Professor Simmons has built a formidable research team at UNSW. 
Image Courtesy: UNSW Australia

Pioneer physicist joins elite academy 
Media issued by UNSW

24 April 2014

Congratulations to ARC Laureate fellow and Scientia Professor of Physics, Michelle Simmons, who has been elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Simmons is Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology at The University of New South Wales.

There are currently only ten Australian Foreign Honorary Members of the Academy.

ARC CEO Professor Aidan Byrne has commended Professor Simmons on this prestigious election.

"This election acknowledges Professor Simmons's outstanding contribution to Australian knowledge and innovation, particularly through her ongoing leadership, teaching and world-first research breakthroughs with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology."

 

 T cell receptor

Image: T-cell receptor (space filling, on top) binds to the DQ2 molecule (ribbon and mesh).
Image courtesy: ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging

The molecular heart of celiac disease revealed
Media issued by Science in Public
24 April 2014

Researchers at the new ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaginghave discovered how immune cells bind to wheat proteins that trigger celiac disease. They have described the molecular basis of how most of the immune cells (T cells) that induce celiac disease lock onto gliadin, a component of gluten, thereby triggering inflammation of the lining of the small intestine. This is what gives many celiac sufferers symptoms similar to food poisoning after eating a slice of toast. The work opens the way to potential treatments and diagnostics.

 

UNSW Bionic ear

Image courtesy: The University of New South Wales

Bionic ear technology used for gene therapy
Media issued by The  University of New South Wales (UNSW)
24 April 2014

Researchers at the UNSW  have for the first time used electrical pulses delivered from a cochlear implant to deliver gene therapy, thereby successfully regrowing auditory nerves.

The research was supported by an ARC Linkage Project grant and the project also has the support of Cochlear Limited.

This research also heralds a possible new way of treating a range of neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease, and psychiatric conditions such as depression through this novel way of delivering gene therapy.

 

  

Fish swimming amongst carbon dioxide bubbles

Image: Fish swimming amongst carbon dioxide bubbles off the coast of PNG.
Image courtesy: Alistair Cheal

Fish respond adversely to ocean acidification
Media issued by The ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies
14 April 2014

In a world-first study published today, researchers have found that fish in the wild respond adversely to ocean acidification.

“Fish living at natural carbon dioxide seeps have abnormal behaviours similar to what we’ve observed in previous laboratory experiments,” says the lead author of the study, Professor Philip Munday from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. He adds that the carbon dioxide levels at the seeps are similar to what is predicted for the oceans in the second half of this century.

 

 

 ncgrt logo

 Image: NCGRT logo

Bailing out the world's fresh water bank
Media issued by The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
14 April 2014

An Australian-based water scientist is testing a new technology to help save imperilled underground water resources in Australia and around the world as climate change tightens its grip on the global food supply.

Dr Margaret Shanafield of the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training at Flinders University has developed a ground-breaking way to measure how much water is stored underground when big rivers are allowed to flood. 

 

 
Thousands of stories in more than 25 Indigenous languages are being digitised

Image: Thousands of stories in more than 25 Indigenous languages are being digitised.
Image courtesy: Charles Darwin University

Unique archive of Indigenous stories opens to the world
Media Issued by Charles Darwin University
7 April 2014

A living archive that is breathing life back into thousands of Indigenous language books created decades ago was launched at Charles Darwin University (CDU) on 7 April.

The archive is an ARC-funded project which aims to preserve thousands of stories in more than 25 Indigenous languages as a resource for Indigenous communities, students, academics and the public to use and to contribute to. It was launched by Dr Tom Calma AO.

CDU Northern Institute Professor of Education and project leader Michael Christie, delivered a public lecture as part of the launch.

More information about the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages is available from the CDU website. 

 

 

 Tobacco plant and molecule

Image: Tobacco plant and molecule
Image courtesy: Dr Fung Lay

Tobacco plant has key to fighting cancer
Media issued by La Trobe University
2 April 2014

Scientists at La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science have identified a tobacco plant's natural defence mechanisms could be harnessed to kill cancer cells in the human body.

The defence molecule, called NaD1, works by forming a pincer-like structure that grips onto lipids present in the membrane of cancer cells and rips it open, causing the cell to expel its contents and explode.

The discovery is the result of a multidisciplinary collaboration. The research utilised equipment at the Australian Synchrotron and was supported by an ARC Discovery Project grant, Hexime Ltd., Balmoral Pty Ltd.

 

 

Jo Whittaker, recent ARC DECRA recipient

Image: Jo Whittaker, recent ARC DECRA recipient. 
Image courtesy: L'Oréal Australia/sdpmedia.com.au

2013 Fellow at work – Jo Wittaker: rocking geophysics
Media issued by Science in Public—L'Oreal
4 April 2014

Recently boosted by winning a prestigious three-year, $389 339 ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award, Dr Whittaker is working to understand how plumes of molten rock drive the movement of continents, and how the internal workings of the planet form the landscapes on the surface.

She presented a talk in San Francisco at the American Geophysical Union last year and has been invited to speak at the European Geophysical Union Annual meeting in Vienna in April.

More information about Dr Whittaker's research can be found here.

 

 

March

 

Immune Cell

Image courtesy: Jeffrey Mak, The University of Queensland.

Immune cell defenders protect us from bacteria invasion
Media issued by the The University of Melbourne

31 March 2014

An international team of researchers, including University of Melbourne staff, supported by the new ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging and the National Health and Medical Research Council, has identified the exact biochemical key that awakes the body's immune cells and sends them into fight against bacteria and fungi.

The patented work provides a deeper understanding of our first line of defence, and what happens when it goes wrong. It will lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcers and even TB. It could also lead to novel protective vaccines.

 

 

kookaburra

Image: Australian Laughing Kookaburra 
Image courtesy: Michelle Meiklejohn Stock Photo - image ID: 10011579 FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Private land 'can help save Australia's imperilled wildlife'
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions
31 March 2014

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and The Australian National University (ANU) have found that unprotected areas are faring far better than old conservation reserves as sanctuaries for the nation's woodland birds. This is because some private lands, when compared with old conservation areas, contain more flat and fertile habitats where woodland birds prosper, say Professor David Lindenmayer and Ms Laura Rayner of CEED and ANU. The finding indicates that unprotected areas have great potential to conserve and restore native wildlife. The researchers also found that landowners who join Landcare groups or have off-farm incomes are more likely to undertake native revegetation, which may help to restore biodiversity on their lands. Professor Brendan Wintle of CEED and Unimelb says this is one of the first biodiversity models to combine social with ecological data.

 

 

Australian ACademy of Science

Image: Australian Academy of Science

Academy welcomes science leaders to Fellowship
Media issued by the Australian Academy of Science
28 March 2014

ARC CEO, Professor Aidan Byrne, has congratulated 21 leaders in Australian science on their election  to the Australian Academy of Science Fellowship. The new Fellows have been elected for their outstanding contributions to and application of scientific research. Every year the Academy honours the work of Australia's leading scientists with election to its Fellowship, which now numbers 481. New Fellows will be formally admitted to the Academy at its annual flagship event, Science at the Shine Dome, in Canberra this May, where they will make short presentations about their work.

 

 

Planet earth sketch

Image courtesy: ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science

Home computers to power climate change research
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science
25 March 2014

Any Australian with a home computer and an internet connection can now power up a climate model and help scientists find the causes of record high temperatures and drought that hit Australia and New Zealand in 2013. The online climate experiment, Weather@Home has been created by a group of scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, the University of Melbourne, University of Oxford in England, the UK Met Office, the University of Tasmania, and the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in New Zealand.

 

 

Artist impression of Type Ia supernovae.

Image: Artist impression of Type Ia supernovae. Courtesy: CAASTRO/Swinburne Astronomy Productions

Newton's gravity unchanged over cosmic time
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics
24 March 2014

[CAASTRO]) Australian astronomers have combined all observations of supernovae ever made to determine that the strength of gravity has remained unchanged over the last nine billion years.

Newton's gravitational constant, known as G, describes the attractive force between two objects, together with the separation between them and their masses.

CAASTRO is funded under the Australian Research Council Centres of Excellence scheme.

 

 

South African PhD student, Emma Gray

Image: South African PhD student, Emma Gray
Image courtesy: Science in Public

UNESCO-L'Oréal For Women in Science International Fellowship
Media issued by Macquarie University
20 March 2014

Congratulations to Emma Gray, announced as a 2014 UNESCO-L'Oréal For Women in Science International Fellow. Emma, from South Africa, will be working as a PhD student on an ARC Discovery Project at Macquarie University. Through her fellowship, Emma will look at why plant species grow at different rates and what factors limit or promote growth in different environments—contributing to a predictive model of how terrestrial systems are likely to respond to climate and land use change.

 

 

Professor Peter Corke with robot 

Image: Professor Peter Corke leads the new $19 million ARC Centre of Excellence in Robotic Vision 
Image courtesy: QUT

New centre will give robots the gift of sight
Media issued by Queensland University of Technology
18 March 2014

The new ARC Centre of Excellence in Robotic Vision, based at the Queensland University of Technology, will receive $19 million for its seven-year research program looking into the next generation of robots. Centre Director, Professor Peter Corke said the Centre will form one of the largest groups of its kind in the world, and will become a focal point for international activity. "This Centre will deliver the science and technologies that will turn cameras into powerful sensing devices capable of understanding and responding to their environment, and enabling robots to operate reliably over long periods, in complex unstructured surroundings where they will interact with humans as well as objects, many of which will require delicate handling."

 

 

Universe

Image: Universe 
Image courtesy: Salvatore Vuono / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hunt for water intensifies 
Media issued by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
18 March 2014

Scientists at the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) are using a promising new theory to track down hidden water both on Earth—where fresh water is becoming dangerously scarce in some regions—and in the quest for life on the red planet, Mars. The latest Earth-based groundwater theories may aid mankind in its quest for water on other planets. The NCGRT is jointly funded by the ARC and the National Water Commission under the ARC's Special Research Initiatives scheme.

 

 

Bromo Volcano Mountain

Image: Bromo Volcano Mountain.
Image courtesy: suwatpo/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Volcanoes helped species survive ice ages
Media issued by The Australian National University 
11 March 2014

An international team of researchers led by the Australian National University and Australian Antarctic Division has found evidence that the steam and heat from volcanoes and heated rocks allowed many species of plants and animals to survive past ice ages, helping understand how species respond to climate change. The research, supported by ARC funding, could solve a long-running mystery about how some species survived and continued to evolve through past ice ages in parts of the planet covered by glaciers.

 

 

budgie

Image courtesy: Salvatore Vuono/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Birds of a feather flock left or right
Media issued by The University of Queensland
7 March 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and the Queensland Brain Institute have discovered how flocks of birds navigate difficult environments, with individuals predisposed to favour the left or right side. The research—supported by an ARC Discovery Projects grant and ARC Centre of Excellence funding—sheds light on how birds fly in flocks without colliding with each other. The study found that budgerigars displayed an individual bias to fly to either the left or the right of objects—this inbuilt bias allows flocks to quickly navigate past obstacles by splitting up and not slowing down due to crowding.

 

 

Mars

Image: Mars 
Image courtesy: fotographic1980 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Critical mass not needed for supernova explosions
Media issued by The Australian National University
4 March 2014

Astronomers searching for clues about dark energy, the mysterious force that is speeding up the expansion of the Universe, have uncovered new evidence about the nature of supernovae, finding many are lighter than expected. The findings, by researchers collaborating with the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) and led by the Australian National University, overturn previous understanding of white dwarf stars and raise new questions about how these stars explode.

 

 

Image: Black and White Freisan Cow iStockphoto.com / © gordondix

Skinny solution: How sound waves are being used to separate fat from milk
Media issued by Swinburne University
4 March 2014

Sound waves may be key to creating the perfect cheese, as research into a new milk separation process looks to revolutionise Australia’s dairy industry. Swinburne University of Technology, together with CSIRO, is researching different skimming technologies through a project partly supported by the ARC’s Linkage Projects scheme. Swinburne’s Associate Professor Richard Manasseh and his team are working with electrical and food process engineers from CSIRO, as well as dairy industry members to examine how ultrasonic waves can be used to gently skim milk.

 

 

February

 ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions logo

Image: ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) logo
Image courtesy: CEED

Beating poachers - with mathematics
Media issued by the University of Queensland
26 February 2014

Environmental scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) at The University of Queensland have developed a new, low-cost way to save rare animals and plants from poachers and plunderers—using maths. The researchers used a cunning mathematical model to outwit poachers in central Africa. CEED researcher and ARC Future Fellow, Dr Richard Fuller, said that by studying the poachers’ incursion patterns and prioritising patrols, the technology could improve protection of endangered animals and plants where they most need it, while minimising patrol and conservation costs.

 

toad

Image: Toad
Image credit: Photo by Tim Dempster. 
Image courtesy: University of Technology Sydney

Tagged toads reveal secrets to invasion success
Media issued by the University of Technology Sydney
26 February 2014

Using a novel approach tagging 20 adult cane toads with acoustic fish tags, researchers have documented for the first time the normally nocturnal adult cane toad entering man-made dams to cool down and rehydrate during the day. How the normally tropical amphibian can survive long, hot dry seasons in arid Australia has been puzzling scientists, but UTS-led research—supported by the ARC—has finally revealed the amphibian's secret: the toad may be changing a key behaviour to survive harsh conditions, thereby improving its chances of ongoing success.

 

Science in Public FameLab logo

Image courtesy: Science in Public (FameLab logo)

Opportunity for young researchers: (link is external) Nominations for FameLab Australia have been extended until midday, Monday, 3 March 2014.

FameLab Australia is an initiative to train, profile and present young/early-career researchers to the media and the public. FameLab is an international communication competition for scientists, including engineers and mathematicians. Designed to inspire and motivate young researchers to actively engage with the public and with potential stakeholders. FameLab is all about finding the best new voices of science and engineering across the world. For more information or to apply visit FameLab (link is external).

 

ACES researchers point out a potential application for fishing line muscles

Image: Researchers point out a potential application for fishing line muscles - replacing noisy motors for louvered windows that respond to changes in temperature. From left: Prof Ray Baughman, Prof Gordon Wallace, Dr Javad Foroughi, Prof John Madden, Sina Naficy, Prof Geoff Spinks 
Image courtesy: ACES

Scientists hook a big one with ordinary fishing line
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science
20 February 2014

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong have used ordinary, everyday fishing line to produce artificial muscles with super human strength. By twisting and coiling simple fishing line and applying heat, powerful artificial muscles are produced. The new muscles can lift one hundred times more weight and generate one hundred times higher mechanical power than human muscle.

 

 

Professor Large and Professor Maslennikov on the hunt for suitable black shales in Siberia

Image: Professor Large and Professor Maslennikov on the hunt for suitable black shales in Siberia. 
Image courtesy: UTAS

Life stuck in slime for a billion years
Media published by Science in Public
19 February 2014 

Researchers at the University of Tasmania (UTAS) have revealed ancient conditions that almost ended life on Earth, using a new technique they developed to hunt for mineral deposits. According to UTAS geologist Professor Ross Large and his international team, the key was a lack of oxygen and nutrient elements, which placed evolution in a precarious position.

 

  

Professor Leonard Collard

Image: Professor Leonard Collard 
Image courtesy: University of Western Australia

New media to throw a lifeline to an ancient language
Media issued by the University of Western Australia
11 February 2014

A new project will create the world's first Aboriginal version of Wikipedia as a way of preserving the ancient and endangered Noongar language—one of Australia's biggest Aboriginal language groups. Professor Leonard Collard at The University of Western Australia's School of Indigenous Studies leads the $610 000, three-year project with colleagues at Curtin University.

 

 

January

Endoscope probe

Image: Endoscope probe. 
Image courtesy Swinburne University of Technology

Medical imaging breakthrough may lead to early cancer detection
Media issued by Swinburne University of Technology
10 January 2014

A breakthrough technique for super-resolution 3D medical imaging of living cells has been developed by researchers at Swinburne University of Technology. The new technique could potentially aid in minimally-invasive surgery and the early detection of cancer. ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor Min Gu and his colleagues Dr Xiangping Li and Dr Hong Kang applied a new technique to—for the first time—demonstrate that greater image definition can be achieved.

 

Australian Academy of Science logo

Image: Australian Academy of Science

Congratulations to the Australian Academy of Science Award recipients
Media issued by the Australian Academy of Science
23 January 2014

The ARC congratulates all recipients of the 2014 Australian Academy of Science (link is external) honorific, research and travelling fellowship award winners, honouring achievements in Australian science. In particular, congratulations to Professor Katherine Belov, Professor Min Gu, Winthrop Professor Ryan Lister, Associate Professor Richard Payne, Professor Geoffrey Pryde, Dr Maria Seton, Professor Chris Turney, Associate Professor David Warton, Dr Gavin Young, Dr Catherine Foley, Dr Kieran Harvey, Dr Rodney van der Ree and Emeritus Professor Curt Wentrup, who have been assisted by funding through the ARC's National Competitive Grants Program.

 

 

Dr Monica Gagliano, The University of Western Australia

Image: Dr Monica Gagliano, The University of Western Australia

Move over elephants – mimosas have memories too – PDF Format (303KB) - Word Format (64KB) 
Media issued by The University of Western Australia
15 January 2014

Dr Monica Gagliano, an ARC research fellow at The University of Western Australia's Centre for Evolutionary Biology, has solid evidence to support her theories that plants are not only able to 'talk' using sound, but 'learn' as well.

Dr Gagliano and her team show that Mimosa pudica plants can learn and remember just as well as it would be expected of animals, however, they do it all without a brain. Using the same experimental framework normally applied to test learnt behavioural responses and trade-offs in animals, the team designed experiments as if Mimosa was indeed an animal.

 

 

Ms Andrea Bianca-Redondo, Dr Chad Husko, and Professor Ben Eggleton at their soliton compression experiment

Image: Ms Andrea Bianca-Redondo, Dr Chad Husko, and Professor Ben Eggleton at their soliton compression experiment. 
Image Courtesy: The ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS)

A first in silicon photonics research
Media issued by the University of Sydney
15 January 2014

An international research team, led by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at the University of Sydney, have observed an on-chip soliton compression in a silicon photonic crystal for the first time.

The team is pursuing this avenue of research in line with the mission of CUDOS to develop photonic chips that are 'faster, smaller, greener'.

 

 

Newborn baby in incubator

Image: Newborn baby in incubator. 
Image Courtesy: ©iStockphoto.com / metinkiyak

Higher risk of birth problems after assisted conception
Media issued by the University of Adelaide 
9 January 2014

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, jointly funded by the ARC and the NHMRC, researchers at the University of Adelaide have shown that the risk of serious complications such as stillbirth, preterm birth, low birth weight and neonatal death is around twice as high for babies conceived by assisted reproductive therapies compared with naturally conceived babies.

 

 

The conch snail

Image: The conch snail stops jumping or takes longer to jump when exposed to the levels of carbon dioxide projected for the end of this century. 
Image courtesy: James Cook University

Jumping snails left grounded in future oceans
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
7 January 2014

An international team including researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University has discovered sea snails that leap to escape their predators may soon lose their extraordinary jumping ability because of rising human carbon dioxide emissions.

 

Schematic representation of a honeybee flying down a tunnel

Image: Schematic representation of a honeybee flying down a tunnel that is illuminated with polarized overhead light, in an experiment to investigate how honeybees use information from the polarization pattern in the sky to signal the direction of a food source to their nest mates. 
Image courtesy 
P. Kraft and M.V. Srinivasan

Bees dance points the way
Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science and Queensland Brain Institute
6 January 2014

New research supported by the ARC has found that honeybees use a pattern of light in the sky invisible to humans to direct one another to a honey source.

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science have demonstrated that even on days when the sun doesn't shine, bees can navigate to and from a honey source by reading the pattern of polarised light in the sky and then explain to other bees where to find it with their 'waggle dance'.

The image shown here is a schematic representation of a honeybee flying down a tunnel that is illuminated with polarized overhead light, in an experiment to investigate how honeybees use information from the polarization pattern in the sky to signal the direction of a food source to their nest mates.

 

 

Sunshine

Solution to cloud riddle reveals hotter future
Media issued by The University of New South Wales
1 January 2014

Research undertaken by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science at The University of New South Wales has found that global average temperatures will rise at least 4°C by 2100 and potentially more than 8°C by 2200 if carbon dioxide emissions are not reduced. [top]

 

2013

December

  • ARC Centre of  Excellence involved in landmark report on aviation biofuels – 17 December 2013               
    An  aviation biofuels study was commissioned by Qantas in 2012/13 to review the  commercial feasibility and long-term viability of Sustainable Aviation Fuel  (SAF), using certified refining technology and infrastructure in Australia. Qantas  formed a joint study team which included the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant  Cell Walls at the University of Adelaide. The full Report can be found at the Qantas  "Environment" website and further information on the ARC Centre of  Excellence in Plant Cell Walls' biofuel research is available from the Centre's "Biofuel  from Plants" page.
  • Researchers grow kidney from stem cells - 16 December 2013
    Media issued by Stem Cells Australia
    Australian researchers have made  a major leap forward in treating renal disease, announcing they have grown a  kidney using stem cells. The breakthrough paves the way for improved treatments  for patients with kidney disease and bodes well for the future of the wider  field of bioengineering organs. The research, published in Nature Cell  Biology, is supported by  the ARC as part of the Stem Cells Australia Special Research Initiative, the  National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the Queensland  Government.
  • New  collaboration to make next-generation computers faster and more powerful – 6 December 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Sydney
    The NSW Government will contribute $300 000 to a photonics  research project between the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth  Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at the University of Sydney, and Technion, the  Israel institute of technology. Centre Director, Professor Ben Eggleton, said  the partnership would allow CUDOS and Technion to work together on fundamental  aspects of nanophotonics and towards realising chip-based optical interconnects  which can revolutionise computing—dramatically increasing the available  bandwidth and, therefore, processing speed.
  • New technique offers potential for  more affordable drugs - 5 December 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Queensland

    University of Queensland researchers have pioneered a drug development  technique that could pave the way for a new class of low-cost medicines. The researchers, led by Professor David Fairlie and Dr Robert Reid from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), designed a technique that reduces  large proteins to small molecules suitable for use as drugs. The research, published in leading scientific journal Nature Communications, was supported by the ARC and National Health and Medical Research Council.
  • Scientists find freshwater sources under the sea floor – 5 December 2013            
    Media issued by The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training         
    Scientists at the NCGRT have discovered huge reserves of freshwater kilometres out to the sea, providing new opportunities to stave off a looming global water crisis. Their work has revealed an estimated half a million cubic kilometres of low-salinity water is buried beneath the seabed on continental shelves around the world. There are ways to access this water: to build a platform out at sea and drill into the seabed, or drill from the mainland or islands close to the aquifers. The NCGRT is jointly funded by the ARC and the National Water Commission (NWC).
  • BioPen to rewrite orthopaedic implants surgery – 4 December 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Wollongong    
    A handheld "bio pen" developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterial Science at the University of Wollongong will allow surgeons to repair damaged and diseased bone material by delivering live cells and growth factors directly to the site of injury, accelerating the regeneration of functional bone and cartilage. The prototype BioPen will give surgeons greater control over where materials are deposited, while also reducing the time a patient is in surgery.

 

November

  • Congratulations to WAs 2013 Tally Poppies – 29  November 2013          
    Media issued by The University of Western Australia
    The ARC congratulates 2013 WA Tall Poppy award recipient, Professor Ryan Lister, genome biologist from the ARC Centre for Excellence in Plant Energy at The University of Western Australia. The awards recognise individuals who combine world-class research with a passionate commitment to communicating science and who  demonstrate great leadership potential. Professor Lister is an ARC Future Fellow. Also a finalist was Dr James Miller-Jones, from the Curtin Institute of  Radio Astronomy at Curtin University, also currently receiving ARC Discovery Project funding.
  • CEPAR highlights importance of population ageing research - 19 November             
    Population  ageing is a global phenomenon. The ARC Centre of  Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR) is developing research and  working with industry and government on the best way to tackle the significant social and economic challenges and opportunities this presents. A new video from the Centre  highlights the research the Centre is currently undertaking. CEPAR is proudly supported by the ARC through as a Centre of Excellence.
  • New research shows unusual El Ninos to occur twice as  often - 17 November 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science
    New collaborative research, led by authors from the ARC  Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, has revealed that the unusual  El Ninos like those that led to the extraordinary super El Nino years of 1982  and 1997, will occur twice as often under even modest global warming scenarios. The findings have been published in Nature.
  • Congratulations to the 2013 Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize recipients – 14  September 2013             
    Media issued by Science in Public
    The ARC congratulates the 2013 Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize recipient, Dr  Connie Wong from Monash University. The award recognises outstanding  creativity in biomedical research by young scientists.  Dr Wong—currently receiving funding under the ARC Discovery Early Career  Research Award scheme—received the $25,000 award for her research  into stroke and its weakening of the immune system. Finalists also included Dr  William Ritchie from the Centenary Institute and Dr Anne Abbott from Monash  University.       

 

October

  • Corals fight warming oceans - 24 October 2013             
    Media issued by Science Alert
    Research undertaken at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University reveals coral animals produce the 'smell of the ocean'—influencing cloud formation and protecting  themselves against rising seawater temperatures. Australian marine scientists have found the first evidence that coral itself may play an important role in regulating local climate. They have discovered that the coral animal—not just its algal symbiont—makes an important sulphur-based molecule with properties to assist it in many ways, ranging from cellular protection in times of heat stress to local climate cooling by encouraging clouds to form.
  • Bees nearly joined the dinosaurs - 24 October 2013            
    Media issued by Flinders University
    The cataclysmic events that wiped out the land dinosaurs some 65 million years ago took a toll on smaller creatures too, causing widespread extinction in bees, Flinders University research has found. In a world first, research by biological scientists Associate Professor Mike Schwarz (supported by ARC funding), Dr Sandra Rehan and Dr Remko Leys has shown that the events at the so-called K-T boundary caused massive extinctions among bee populations, reflected in major changes in the development of flowering plants on Earth.
  • Research brings  unbreakable phones one step closer – 23 October 2013            
    Media issued by RMIT University
    Imagine dropping your phone and seeing it bounce rather than  break. Research at RMIT University is bringing that day closer. The research, supported by Australian Post-Doctoral Fellowships from the ARC to Dr Bhaskaran  and Dr Sharath Sriram, is advancing transparent bendable electronics for use in  science fiction-like gadgets - unbreakable rubber-like phones, rollable tablets  and even functional clothing. Researchers from RMIT's Functional Materials and  Microsystems research group have developed a new method to transfer electronics  with versatile functionality, which are usually made on rigid silicon, onto a  flexible surface.
  • Rescuing wildlife with maths – 18 October 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions
    In a bid to save endangered animals from extinction by  climate change, a team of Australian and New Zealand environmental scientists  has pioneered a revolutionary way of deciding whether animals can safely be  re-located. The researchers have 'test-driven' the new framework using the  hypothetical case of the New Zealand tuatara, the country's largest reptile, which is being considered for relocation from its home on a number of small  offshore islands in the north of NZ to the South Island, where it is currently extinct. The study was co-funded by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED).
  • Photons on demand now possible on hair's width optical chip - 11 October 2013            
    Media issued by The University of Sydney
    A breakthrough  in photonics that will help create extremely compact optical chips, a hair's  width in size and delivering a photon at a time, has been achieved by  researchers from the University of Sydney. "This result  has applications in the development of complex quantum technologies, including  completely secure communications, quantum measurement, the simulation of  biological and chemical systems and of course quantum computing," said Dr Alex  Clark, leader of the research team from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS). Carried out at the University of Sydney's School of  Physics, the research is published in Nature  Communications today.
  • Corals 'can fight acidifying oceans' - 11 October 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
    In a  world-first, scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef  Studies (CoECRS) have shown that tropical corals have the ability to fight back against acidifying oceans caused by human emissions of carbon dioxide. While the threat of coral bleaching from higher sea-surface temperatures and direct  human impacts still present serious risks to the long-term prospects for coral reefs, the research findings suggest that many corals have the ability to largely offset the effects of increasingly acidic oceans.           
  • Seafood lovers 'can help save our reefs' - 10 October 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies            
    Seafood  lovers can play a crucial role in deciding the fate of the world's coral reefs  and their gorgeously-coloured fish, according toa leading marine scientist. Seafood consumption is a major driver of overfishing and destruction of reef  communities globally but there are some encouraging signs that consumers may be willing to eat more sustainably. These research outcomes will be presented  by Dr Mike Fabinyi of the ARC Centre of  Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the Coral  Reefs in the 21st Century symposium in Townsville on Friday 11th October.

 

September

  • Early test warns of world’s leading eye disease - 23 September 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science
    A new, quick and simple eye test can predict who is more at risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence  in Vision Science have found that while people with early AMD can still see in fine detail, other parts of their vision may be damaged and this isn’t  revealed by current eye tests. The new test can show doctors or optometrists where to look and when to watch a patient more closely, helping them to lessen the risk of the disease and avoid total blindness.
  • Congratulations to the 2013 Scopus Young Researcher Award recipients – 13 September 2013            
    Media issued by Elsevier
    The ARC congratulates the 2013 Scopus Young Researcher Award recipients. The awards recognise these academics as some of Australia’s most distinguished young  researchers for their outstanding achievements. Four out of the five recipients of the Scopus awards this year have been assisted by funding through the ARC’s National Competitive Grants Program, they are: Dr Zenobia Jacobs, Professor Bryan Gaensler, Dr Da-Wei Wang and Dr Barry Brook. The ARC is proud to support all  research, but especially to encourage and develop our up-and-coming research leaders who are the innovators of Australia’s future.
  • ARC Future Fellow receives Queensland Literary Award – 10 September 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Western Australia
    The ARC congratulates ARC Future Fellow, Professor Jane Lydon for  winning the history book category in the 2013 Queensland Literary Awards for  her photographic work The Flash of Recognition: Photography and the  Emergence of Indigenous Rights. The ARC values her contribution to archaeology, in particular Australia’s colonial past and its legacies in the present. The ARC is pleased that Professor Lydon’s outstanding achievements in this field have been recognised  with this prestigious award. The ARC is proud to support her research work, particularly through a Future Fellowship.
  • Congratulations to the 2013 Eureka Prize recipients– 4 September 2013             
    Media issued by the Australian Museum
    The ARC congratulates the 2013 Eureka Prize recipients. The awards honour their contribution to Australian research,  knowledge and innovation and the impact they will have on our future  prosperity. The awards are recognition by the Australian community of the important  role they play in Australia’s future. The ARC is proud to support the research of a number of Eureka Prize recipients, including: Professor Frank Caruso, Dr Kerrie Wilson, Professor Lloyd  Hollenberg, Professor Rob Brooks, Professor Rick Shine,  Professor James McCluskey, Professor Jamie Rossjohn, Professor Ary Hoffmann, Dr Elizabeth McGraw, Dr Michael Letnic and Associate Professor David Wilson.

 

August

  • Solving secrets of the wine cellar - 30 August 2013             
    Media issued by UWA Institue of Agriculture
    Cutting-edge technology is being used by researchers at The University of Western Australia and Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA) to identify differences in the top Cabernet Sauvignon grape clones to benefit the local wine industry and consumers.The project will apply cutting-edge techniques in genomics to several clones on which extensive knowledge is already available from Western Australian and South Australian improvement programs. In addition to the genomic component, the project will include vineyard studies. The three-year project has received total funding of $574,000 from the Australian Research Council. The research is supported by 24 companies represented by the WA Vine Improvement Association, prominent national retailer Yalumba and the Australian Wine Research Institute.
  • Saving Earth’s water from toxic waste – 20 August 2013             
    Media issued by The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training
    Scientists at The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training  (part-funded by the ARC) and University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have devised  a better way to protect groundwater from acids, heavy metals and toxic  chemicals, helping to secure the Earth’s main freshwater supply. The  advance is a major step towards shielding groundwater from mining, industrial  and domestic waste, all of which can contaminate the water for decades, rendering it unusable and undrinkable.
  • Nemo can’t go home – 20 August 2013             
    Media issued by The ARCCentre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
    An international team of marine scientists with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University has found that sea anemones, which provide shelter for clownfish and 27 other fish species, are facing the same worldwide threat as coral reefs— bleaching and loss due to rising water temperatures.
  • Tiny fish makes ‘eyes’ at their killer – 19 August 2013            
    Media issued by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
               
    New research has found that small prey fish can grow a bigger ‘eye’ on their rear fins as a way of distracting predators and dramatically boosting their chances of survival. The research undertaken at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) is a world-first discovery, and has not only found that these fish can grow a larger false ‘eye spot’ near their tail, but they can also reduce the size of their real eyes.

 

July

  • Scientists look to the ocean as fuel of the future – 10 July 2013               
    Media issued by Reuters.com
    Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) centre at the University of Wollongong in Australia have found a new way to split seawater into hydrogen and oxygen, and use those gases as fuel. Click here to view video and transcript.
  • How coral cures your ills - 1 July 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
    A dramatic discovery by an Australian team of scientists has revealed that the ability of humans to resist bacterial diseases may go as far back in our ancestry as corals. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) have found three genes in Acropora (staghorn) corals which show a very fast, strong immune response to the presence of bacteria – and the same genes also occur in mammals, including people. The main goal of the research is to better understand the mechanisms by which corals resist attack by bacteria and viruses – an urgent task in view of a massive upsurge in coral diseases around the world, which researchers attribute to the impact of human activity on the oceans and on coral reefs themselves.

 

June

  • New step towards silicon-based quantum computer - 19 June 2013               
    Media issued by The University of New South Wales            
    UNSW researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology have proposed a new way to distinguish between quantum bits that are placed only a few nanometres apart in a silicon chip, taking them a step closer to the construction of a large-scale quantum computer. Quantum bits, or qubits, are the basic building blocks of quantum computers—ultra-powerful  devices that will offer enormous advantages for solving complex problems. Professor Michelle Simmons, leader of the research team, said a qubit based on  the spin of an individual electron bound to a phosphorus atom within a silicon chip is one of the most promising systems for building a practical quantum computer, due to silicon's widespread use in the microelectronics industry.

  • Making memories brings us closer to  quantum computers - 19 June 2013               
    Media issued by The University of Sydney       
    A breakthrough which brings us closer to solving problems more complex than any current supercomputer can address, in codebreaking, physics, and clean energy, has been achieved by researchers from the University of Sydney and Dartmouth College in the US. "This work brings us closer to creating a quantum computer powerful enough that it could one day be used in developing new materials for clean-energy distribution or in rapidly searching through massive amounts of unsorted data to identify security threats online: problems on which even today’s most powerful supercomputers fail," said Dr Michael Biercuk, Director of the Quantum Control Laboratory in the University of Sydney’s School of Physics and ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems. The details of how the researchers developed an entirely new way of designing a practically useful quantum memory, a key need for future quantum computers, will be published in Nature Communications on Thursday, 19 June.

  • Australian  researchers part of international team to combat heart disease - 17 June 2013               
    Media issued by Stem Cells Australia           
    An international consortium of cardiac stem cell experts has been awarded a prestigious grant to better understand the role of these cells in heart function and repair. The six year USD$6million grant awarded by the France-based Fondation Leducq Transatlantic Networks of  Excellence will enable this multi-disciplinary international team to reveal more about cardiac stem cells and their role in heart function and repair. Stem Cells Australia is funded by the ARC as a Special Research Initiative.

  • Plastics for bags and bodies - 4 June 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Sydney           
    Biomolecular engineers at the University of Sydney are creating cleaner, more cost-effective PPC polymers that promise to transform the biodegradable polymer industry. The plastics being developed will have a broad range of usability, at one end of the spectrum being used for fully recyclable shopping bags, at the other, as restorative implants in the human body. The project has been funded by both the Australian Research Council and bioplastics subsidiary CO2Starch.
  • Rare tree provides key to greener chemistry - 2 June 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology
    A rare tree found in Malaysia and Borneo holds the secret to greener chemical production, according to researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). The research team, led by Professor Michael Sherburn and Dr Andrew Lawrence from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology at ANU, have created a new, environmentally friendly method to replicate molecules found in the Medang tree. These molecules, known as kingianins, have shown promise as a lead in anti-cancer drug development, but research has been hampered due to the vanishingly small quantities that can be extracted from the Medang tree.

 

May

  • Deep refuges ‘can help save our reefs’ – 30 May 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies        
    Marine scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and the USA are calling out for global efforts to protect deeper coral reefs as insurance against the widespread destruction of shallow reefs and their fish stocks now taking place around the world. In research published in the journal Nature Climate Change the scientists argue that efforts to identify and protect reefs lying 30-150 metres below the surface should be stepped up, so as to provide a secure refuge for fish and corals that can also live on deeper reefs.
  • Coral reefs ‘ruled by earthquakes and volcanoes’ - 22 May 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies          
    A world-first study from the ARC Centre of  Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) has found that titanic forces in the Earth’s crust explains why the abundance and richness of coral varies dramatically across the vast expanse of the Indian and Pacific oceans. Scientists from CoECRS reveal that abrupt changes in the mix of coral species  are associated with earthquakes, volcanoes and jostling among the earth’s giant tectonic plates. The study shows that slow geological processes generate the patterns of reef biodiversity that we see today. This also explains why some coral species are more widespread than others. It is understood that rich coral communities arise from geological processes that take place over millions of years and they will be even harder to replace if lost due to global warming.
  • Strawberry fields forever and fungus-free - 22 May 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Western Australia School of Plant Biology   
    Researchers at The University of Western Australia have identified mechanisms that strawberry plants use to combat a serious strawberry fungus, which will pave the way for developing new strawberry cultivars with improved resistance to the fungus. This will mean growers should be able to use fewer anti-fungal chemicals, with reduced input cost and improved outcome on human health and the environment. The researchers' findings provide the first understanding of strawberry plant resistance at a molecular level and it’s hoped more effective and sustainable disease management strategies can be adopted locally and nationally. The research is supported by the ARC.
  • US  Government funds US/Australian/Indian collaboration for abiotic stress tolerant  cereals - 22 May 2013             
    Media issued by The Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics           
    A new research program is being supported by the  US Agency for International Development (USAID) in partnership with The Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) and Vibha Agrotech Limited to apply transgenic technologies to enhance environmental stress tolerance in cereal crops. The research is part of the US government’s global  hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. The collaboration will combine the ACPFG gene systems and technologies with the field evaluation and rice transformation capabilities of Vibha. A series of transgenic wheat and  rice lines will be developed that show enhanced tolerance to drought and salinity stresses.
  • 3-D models of root architecture predicts traits for specific environments- 20 May 2013              
    Media issued by the School  of Earth and Environment University of Western Australia        
    Scientists may soon be able to develop crop  plants with roots that can cope with challenging soil and environmental conditions. A new study has suggested that it is possible to develop crop  varieties for different environments by using a combination of plant selection and computer simulation modelling. Researchers from the University of Western Australia, the Department of Agriculture and Food in Western Australia and institutions in Tasmania and Germany have compared modelling simulations with  glasshouse varieties. This has given scientists valuable information in crop plant roots and how they take up water and nutrients.
  • Saturation wreaks deep benefits - 14 May  2013            
    Media issued by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training            
    Scientists from Australia’s  National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) say they have  been impressed with recharge rates of groundwater following the 2011 floods in  Queensland and Victoria. Researchers at the NCGRT are making estimates of Australian groundwater availability in the future based on learning gauged from the recent floods. With this information the NCGRT intends to provide state and Australian Government water authorities with a clearer picture of ground water  demands. This information will also look at how to form sustainable procedures  for Australia’s underground reserves well into the future. The NCGRT is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the ARC and the National Water Commission.
  • Saline tolerant plants- 10 May 2013              
    Media issued by the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics        
    A technology that enhances salinity tolerance in  plants has been secured by the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics. The technology was secured after field testing in Western Australia showed  significant improvements in barley yields. The technology, discovered at the  University of Connecticut (UConn) by world renowned scientist Dr Roberto  Gaxiola, will be used to improve Australian cereal varieties.
  • ARC Laureate Fellow Professor Peter Hall  elected to National Academy of Sciences– 2 May 2013             
    Media issued by The University of Melbourne        
    ARC CEO, Professor Aidan Byrne, congratulates 2011 ARC Laureate Fellow  Professor Peter Hall from the University of Melbourne for his election to the  prestigious US-based National Academy of Science (NAS). Professor Hall has  been elected  in recognition  of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.  Professor Hall is a world-leading researcher in probability and mathematical  statistics, and in 2011, Professor Hall received his fourth ARC Laureate Fellowship to develop important advances in statistics, leading to new  statistical methodologies.
  • Ancient archaeological dig reveals in Southeast Asia –  1 May 2013               
    Media issued by The Australian National University School of Archaeology and Anthropology       
    More  than 140 ancient burials including men, women, teenagers and children have been  recovered from a site in the Thanh Hoa province in Northern Vietnam. The dig is  being led by Dr Marc Oxenham  from The Australian National University's School of Archaeology and Anthropology with funding support from the Australian Research Council. The burial site, known as Con Co Ngua, is believed to have existed sometime between  5000 and 6000 years ago. Rising sea levels have helped preserve the site under a thick cap of marine clay.

 

April

  • Saving city wildlife - 29 April 2013               
    Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions             
    Natural urban ecosystems and protecting wildlife  is often overlooked during the urban planning process. The loss of natural  ecosystems in cities poses a risk to public health and the quality of life of  urban citizens according to Dr Sarah Bekessy form the ARC Centre of Excellence  for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and RMIT University. Australian citizens can  become more involved in planning their cities with wildlife in mind thanks to a  new tool developed by the CEED team. The tool ranks sites for development  according to various priorities such as biodiversity loss, flood risk and  transport.
  • First Australian win for US plant  biology award - 19 April 2013            
    Media issued by University of Western Australia      
    The University  of Western Australia's internationally recognised plant scientist Winthrop  Professor Harvey Millar has become the first Australian to win a prestigious  American award in its 40-year history. Professor Millar, who is Deputy Director  at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at UWA, has a passion  for proteins and how they work and has built a remarkable career in the 16  years since he graduated from The Australian National University with a PhD in  biochemistry.
  • Quantum computing taps nucleus of single atom - 18 April 2013 
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology          
    A team of Australian engineers from ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology and the University of New South Wales (UNSW) has demonstrated a quantum bit based on the nucleus of a single atom in silicon. The findings show promising dramatic improvements for data processing in ultra-powerful quantum computers of the future.
  • Scientists call for large ocean wilderness parks - 15 April 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies          
    Leading international marine scientists, including researchers  from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, have called for the  protection of larger marine wilderness areas in a bid to shield the world's dwindling stocks of fish from destruction. Scientists from Australia and the US  have been working in the world's largest unfished marine reserve, the remote  Chagos Archipelago in the central Indian Ocean to gather data. Their findings provide the world's first clear evidence that large-scale marine wilderness reserves are better for conserving fish than the  far more common, small marine protected areas that many governments and fishing communities are presently implementing.
  • New way to protect precious water - 10 April 2013            
    Media issued by the NCGRT     
    Researchers at  the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) have  developed a new model to predict where – and how fast – polluted groundwater can move from a contaminated site, allowing water managers to better locate and  clean up the water. The NCGRT is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the  ARC and the National Water Commission.
  • Optics innovation an industry success - 9  April 2013            
    Media issued by the University of Sydney     
    A researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for  Optical Systems (CUDOS), has  created a new processor technology that allows light to be split in extremely  sophisticated ways. The processor is a computer programmable optical filter  that can shape light. It can, for example, compress incoming light pulses to  become very short, or shape an incoming 'rainbow' of light into an output that  is only made up of red and blue light. The new technology has made its creator,  Dr Jochen Schroeder, the winner of the Innovation Prize from CUDOS (February  2013), celebrating Australian innovations in optics and photonics. It has also  been a successful technology transfer story, creating a wave of sales for Finisar, one of the world's Largest Supplier of Optical  Communication Components and Subsystems.
  • Discovery  measures greenhouse gases from space- 3 April 2013            
    Media issued by University of Western Australia             
    Supported by an ARC Discovery  program grant, scientists have discovered how to measure greenhouse gases 200  000 times faster as the result of research by an award-winning PhD student from  The University of Western Australia and a US team. The discovery, which is already being used by  NASA scientists in Space, has major implications for global warming research,  breath analysis (to detect illness), explosives detection, chemical process monitoring  and a range of other applications, including fundamental quantum theory.
  • Community  Power 'Can Rescue Failing Fish Stocks' - 1 April 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre for  Excellence in Coral Reef Studies          
    An international team of  scientists have used genetic 'fin-printing' to gather the first clear proof  that small traditional fishing grounds, that are effectively managed by local communities, can help re-stock both themselves and surrounding marine areas.  The finding has big implications for hundreds of millions of people around the  world who depend on coral reefs for food and livelihood. "This is a really  important finding, because it shows that small community-run fisheries can preserve their fish stocks and can boost fish stocks in a surrounding radius of  30 kilometres or more," said Dr Glenn Almany from the ARC Centre of Excellence  for Coral Reef Studies and James Cook University.       

 

March

  • Improving the flow of the fibre optic freeway – 26 March 2013             
    Media issued by Monash University          
    Research  conducted at Monash University, supported by the ARC, has played an important  part in the invention of an energy-efficient method of increasing the data capacity of optical networks. It has the potential to dramatically boost the overall performance of networks such as the National Broadband Network (NBN), while reducing costs.  
  • Closing the gap between conservation and communities – 26 March 2013           
    Media issued by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions           
    Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have completed a world first study into how governments can balance the needs of society and  industry with those of endangered wildlife and environments. There is potential for this approach to dispel some of the long-running  tensions between conservationists, industry, government and communities.
  • Climate 'brings opportunities and threats to the Pacific' – 25  March 2013             
    Media issued by ARC Centre for  Excellence in Coral Reef Studies         
    Marine scientists from France, New Caledonia, Fiji and Australia (supported by the ARC Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies) have revealed that climate change will bring both big opportunities and threats to the Pacific region, where more than 25% of GDP (gross domestic product) depends upon fishing. Impacts include  a projected decline in coral reef fish, shellfish and crustacean harvests, along with a shift in tuna feeding and breeding grounds which would result in a  'net gain' in the south and east Pacific region.
  • New roads might  help environment – 21 March 2013             
    Media issued by James Cook University          
    The work  of leading ecologist Professor William Laurance, an ARC Laureate Fellow  researching Australia's leadership in tropical conservation science, has  featured in Nature. Professor  Laurance, along with colleague Professor Andrew Balmford (University of Cambridge, UK), has found that despite the  strong impact road construction has on forest destruction and wildfires, a global mapping program can advise on where to avoid building new roads and close existing ones, to halt severe environmental damage.
  • Wallabies start pouch climb in womb – 17 March 2013             
    Media issued by Nature's Scientific Reports          
    Two  researchers at the University of Melbourne, supported by ARC grants, are part of a team which has completed a study of developmental events experienced by  small species of the kangaroo and wallaby family. This included the finding  that the tiny tammar fetus displays preparative climbing movements up to three  days before birth, exhibiting highly coordinated movements which don't occur until much later in eutherian mammals. The study involved collaboration with researchers from Germany.
  • Genetic mystery solved – 8 March 2013             
    Media issued by the University of  New South Wales          
    Research conducted by the UNSW's Dean of Science, Professor Merlin Crossley, has identified the final missing piece in the genetic puzzle of an unusual form of haemophilia, more than 20 years after he discovered the first two pieces. The research, which could help improve understanding of other blood-clotting conditions such as thrombosis, received funding from the Australian Research Council.
  • Local dig uncovers new species of ancient fish – 7 March 2013             
    Media issued by the Australian National University         
    An ARC Discovery Projects grant has assisted researchers at the Australian National University in discovering a new species of ancient fish. The researchers have unearthed the largest fossilised lobe-finned fish skull ever found in rocks of Devonian age. The fossils were found during an excavation of 360 million-year-old rock near Eden on the NSW South Coast.
  • Bacteria  and the bees: honey improves antibiotics – 1 March 2013             
    Media by University of Technology Sydney Newsroom           
    According to new findings by UTS researchers, supported by ARC Linkage Project funding, medical-grade manuka honey (Medihoney) can improve the effectiveness of antibiotics and prevent the emergence of resistance. This has significant implications for the fight  against drug-resistant bacteria such as the superbug MRSA (golden staph).
  • Scientists  call for legal trade in rhino horn – 1 March 2013            
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions           
    Due to the failure of a global ban on rhino products and soaring death rates among the world’s remaining population, four leading scientists (including Duan Biggs and  Hugh Possingham of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions) have argued for the introduction of a legal trade in rhino horn – in a last  ditch effort to save the species from extinction.

 

February

  • Shallow  reefs facing increased acidity – 27 February 2013             
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate  System Science              
    A study by Australian researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System  Science has revealed that heightened levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can lead to increased ocean acidity throughout shallow coastal reefs and ecosystems.
  • 'Blood test'  for crook corals  27 February 2013              
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef  Studies            
    Australian  researchers are developing a stress-test for coral, using a world-first  scientific discovery which measures how coral reefs are being impacted by  pressures from climate change and human activity.
  • Nesting site protection ‘key to save turtles from climate change’  - 19 February 2013              
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef  Studies           
    A new  study by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies reveals that some turtle populations in the West Indian, Northeast Indian,  North Pacific, East Atlantic and East Pacific oceans are among the least likely to recover from the impacts of climate change.
  • Supercomputers to supercharge antioxidants - 19 February 2013             
    Media by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology      
    The future of keeping ageing-related diseases at bay lies with the supercomputer   according to scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical  Chemistry and Biotechnology at The University of Sydney. Researchers have used sophisticated quantum chemistry and  powerful supercomputers to design improved antioxidants which will help stave  off ageing-related diseases like Alzheimer's and heart disease.
  • Aussies told: cut water use to save bush – 18 February 2013               
    Media  by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training            
    Australians may be asked to reduce  their use of bore water in order to preserve native landscapes. Researchers at the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT) have found that eucalypts, melaleucas, acacias  and other Australian native trees drink much more groundwater than previously  thought. The NCGRT is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the ARC and the National Water Commission.
  • Australia’s creative economy surges – 11 February 2013              
    Media by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation         
    New research conducted at the ARC Centre of Excellence  for Creative Industries and Innovation has found more than half a million  Australians now work in the creative sector, making it one of the fastest  growing, dynamic segments of the national economy. Centre Director, Professor Stuart Cunningham, said the rate of growth was well above that for the  Australian workforce in general and it confirmed the trend evident in the past  two decades.
  • Secrets of ancient climate- 8 February 2013               
    Media by University of Wollongong          
    What  was Earth’s climate like almost four billion years ago? Given that the Sun was  30% cooler, was the Earth chilly or did an atmosphere much richer in greenhouse  gases keep it warm? These are among some of Earth’s secrets being answered by  researchers supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant. The research aims to solve problems surrounding Earth’s early climate almost four billion years ago, and to  understand the part that life might have already played in regulating it.
  • Crumbling bores 'jeopardise nation's water' - 4 February 2013             
    Media by National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training           
    Fifteen thousand collapsing bores – and a  half-billion dollar repair bill – are endangering the future of Australia’s  largest and most precious resource, its groundwater. The National Centre for  Groundwater Research and Training is an Australian Government initiative, supported by the Australian Research Council and the National Water Commission.           
  • Quantum microscope reveals cells – 4 February 2013             
    Media by University of Queensland           
    A team of Australian scientists has developed a  powerful microscope using the laws of quantum mechanics to probe the inner  workings of living cells. Team leader Associate Professor Warwick Bowen, of  UQ's ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, said the study  relied on quantum interactions between the photons of light to achieve measurement precision that surpassed conventional measurement.
  • Listening to electrons: new method brings scaling-up quantum devices one step closer - 1 February 2013
    Media by University of Sydney            
    Quantum devices  will revolutionise computing, enabling huge calculations to be completed that  classical computers simply cannot do. "Our new  method for detecting charge in quantum systems is exciting and has implications  for a range of nanotechnologies," said Associate Professor David Reilly, from the ARC Centre for Engineered Quantum  Systems in the School of  Physics at the University of Sydney.       

 

January

  • ‘Petri dish lens’ gives hope for new eye treatments – 31  January 2013               
    Media by Monash University              
    A cure for congenital sight  impairment caused by lens damage is closer following research by scientists at  Monash University. Associate Professor Tiziano Barberi and Dr Isabella  Mengarelli from the Australian  Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI) at Monash University are  closer to growing parts of the human eye in the lab. The study published in Stem Cells Translational Medicine was partly funded by the Australian Research  Council.
  • Ocean heatwave killed seaweed - 22 January 2013              
    Media by The University of Western Australia             
    The  decimation of a seaweed that provides vital habitat for an interdependent web of marine species off the West Australian coast, as a consequence of a record  ocean heatwave, has been revealed in a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The research was conducted by ARC Future Fellow, Associate  Professor Thomas Wernberg and his colleague Dr Daniel Smale.
  • Using HIV to attack itself – 21 January 2013               
    Media issued by the Queensland Institute of Medical Research            
    Associate Professor David Harrich, from QIMR’s Molecular Virology Laboratory, has determined how to modify a protein in the HIV virus, so that it instead  provides strong, lasting protection from infection. Associate Professor  Harrich has been researching HIV for thirty years, since starting as a research  assistant at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the early 1980s. An Australian Research Council Future Fellowship funds Professor Harrich’s research.
  • Tiny reef speedster challenges tuna in the ocean sprint– 14 January 2013             
    Media by ARC Centre of Excellence Coral Reef Studies           
    Australian  scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and The Australian National University have found that tiny coral reef wrasses on the  Great Barrier Reef can swim as fast as some of the swiftest fish in the  ocean—but use only half as much energy to do so.
  • More room needed for  coastal wetlands - 13 January 2013              
    Media by the University of Queensland
    Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) say Australia’s planners and coastal communities need to think up to 100 years ahead to ensure the survival of mangroves, salt marshes, sedge lands and melaleuca swamps and their wildlife.
  • Results flatline for top students– 10 January 2013            
    Media issued by Melbourne University             
    A major Victorian study, funded by the ARC, looking into how teachers use test data to help children learn, has revealed that while  struggling students clocked up huge improvements after six months, the performances of top students stagnated.
  • Even If We Stopped Polluting Today, Ocean Garbage Patches Would Linger For Hundreds Of Years– 9 January 2013            
    Media issued by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science       
    The  Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a horrifying consequence of our never-ending  consumption. Now, new research shows that even if we could eliminate plastic waste and prevent all litter from making its way to the ocean, these Patches would continue to mar the planet for hundreds of years. 
  • Faster help for stroke patients– 4 January 2013             
    Media issued by The Vision Centre and The Australian National University          
    Researchers created a new vision test that assesses how much and which part of the brain of  a stroke victim has been damaged. The test requires patients to look into a  device for about ten minutes, enabling it to be used in the early stages of a  stroke – even if the patient cannot move their limbs or speak.

 

2012                            

December

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November

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October

  • Citizen scientists 'helping discover Australia' – 24 October 2012             
    Media issued by SciNews. Full Article printed in Decision Point, October 2012          
    Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions have found amateur naturalists and other unpaid 'citizen scientists' are playing a huge and vital role in the ongoing 'discovery' of Australia and all that it contains.

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September

  • Harnessing waste energy to power factories – 5 September 2012             
    Originally written and published by Science in Public
    Government-Industry collaboration through ARC Linkage Projects grant and Baxter Healthcare allowing researchers to look for ways to make factories more sustainable.
  • Seeds of an idea grow to fruition – 27 September 2012            
    Support  from the ARC has helped build a research career, and create innovative  products and industries.             
    Professor Peter Hodgson – Deakin University

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August

  • Nano-structures to realise hydrogen’s energy potential –15 August 2012             
    Media issued by the University of New South Wales         
    In what has been described as world first  research, engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have demonstrated that hydrogen can be released and reabsorbed from a promising  storage material, overcoming a major hurdle to its use as an alternative fuel  source. The research supported by the ARC has been published in the journal ACS Nano.

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June

  • New tool for better breast cancer detection - 30 June 2012             
    Originally written and published by Science in Public     
    ARC Discovery Project grant empowering Queensland scientists to help radiologists to spot the more subtle signs of breast cancer, using computer tools and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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March

  • World’s smallest precision transistor a leap forward- 9 March 2012
    A functioning transistor the size of a single atom  may be a breakthrough for quantum computing             
    Professor Michelle Simmons - ARC Centre for Quantum  Computation and Communication - University of New South Wales       

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