The ARC created the Kathleen Fitzpatrick fellowship to be awarded to outstanding female researchers in humanities, arts and social sciences. 

 


Professor Pippa Norris (2011) 

Research

Professor Pippa Norris’ Laureate project aimed to investigate how to make democratic governance work. In particular, the project has deepened and advanced understanding of the causes and consequences of problems of electoral integrity around the world (Please see The Electoral Integrity Project).

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

Professor Norris conducted three initiatives focused on research and capacity development.

The research initiative looked at the barriers to gender equality in elected office, especially the use of quota laws and reforms to internal processes of candidate selection within political parties. Professor Norris’ Electoral Integrity Project (EIP) has conducted new comparative research on this subject, including the Perceptions of Electoral Integrity rolling expert survey which monitors equal opportunities for women to run for office, along with many other factors, in 213 elections and 153 countries worldwide from mid-2012 to mid-2016.

A related policy advocacy and analysis component has focused upon the use of gender quotas designed to strengthen gender equality in elected office, and the pros and cons of alternative ways these can be implemented. This has generated several major policy reports for regional organizations, including UNDP Asia-Pacific and the OSCE, and policy advisory presentations in countries as diverse as Mongolia, China, Vietnam and Bangladesh.

The EIP project also developed the skills and capacities of younger women scholars. Visiting semester-long scholarships and internships were created, bringing around three dozen international visitors to The University of Sydney during the last five years, including many women graduates in the final stages of completing their PhDs and female visiting scholars as well.

Image courtesy: The University of Sydney.

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""Professor Susan O’Connor (2012)

Research

Professor Susan O’Connor’s Laureate project has investigated modern human dispersal, adaptations and behaviour along the southern maritime route to Australia. Using strategic testing of archaeological and biotic deposits, museum collections and predictive modelling, it has helped us understand the unique adaptive and cognitive abilities that were required to make this journey.

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

Professor O’Connor has administered an internship scheme in the Australian National University’s Department of Archaeology and Natural History, which has allowed recent female graduates paid time to write up their PHD research for publication.

She will also undertake an academic workshop at the Australian Archaeological Association Annual Conference, which will seek to discuss gender levels in archaeology from undergraduate to post graduate and across all academic levels (teaching and research) across Australian universities.

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""Professor Glenda Sluga (2013) 

Research

Professor Glenda Sluga’s Laureate project will position Australia as a leader in research that investigates the historical legacy of internationalism—from international institutions, practices and ideas, to the international order—in the early twenty-first century. Professor Sluga’s project intends to provide a genealogy of how, in the years after 1815, economics and politics intersected historically to make the modern global world.

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

Professor Sluga is undertaking a series of initiatives to promote and assist the discussion of women in the humanities (both as researchers and as the subjects of research), setting research agendas at the highest levels and providing assistance to Early Career women. She is also working to promote the work of women in international history through short-term junior research fellowships, and visiting fellowships.

Image courtesy: The University of Sydney.

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""Professor Joy Damousi (2014)

Research

Professor Joy Damousi’s Laureate project aims to generate new and powerful understandings of the impact and experiences of child refugees in Australia throughout the twentieth century and early twenty-first century, to explore how this history is tied to the history of Australia’s international role on refugee and migration issues, and to examine how our past can inform us about current and future approaches to humanitarian immigration

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

Professor Damousi runs a five-day, Australia-wide research leadership mentoring program, the ARC Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Fellowship at University of Melbourne for early career women in the humanities and the social sciences. The focus of this program is to provide mentoring in leadership for the most outstanding of Australia’s women researchers in the humanities and social sciences. It involves workshops on all aspects of developing and sustaining leadership in a research career.

It involves participants presenting their research; commenting and providing feedback on drafts; and exposing participants to a variety of speakers who would share their own experiences. In addition to these practical activities and direct mentoring of their own research projects, this program offers participants an exploration of a range of skills such as developing career strategies and enhancing career progression.

Image courtesy: The University of Melbourne.

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""Professor Anne Orford (2015)

Research

Professor Anne Orford’s Laureate project aims to answer the question of whether and if so when it is lawful for external actors to intervene in support of parties to a civil war. The urgency of this question and the difficulty of finding general principles to address it are illustrated by the intensity of debates about the legality of intervention by numerous countries in Iraq and Syria and by Russia in Ukraine.

Professor Orford will build an interdisciplinary team to develop new legal concepts to make sense of the responsibilities of external actors in civil war, taking into account new norms and practices developed to protect civilians and to fight terrorism. It aims to provide governments, parliaments, and the public with a framework for understanding the legal issues involved in decisions about intervention.

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

Professor Orford has created two visiting fellowship schemes—the Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Postdoctoral Fellowship and the Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Doctoral Fellowship. The Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellowships are designed to enable outstanding female doctoral and early career researchers to visit the Melbourne Law School and work with the Laureate Program in International Law for one to two months. The Fellows are closely integrated into the program. 

Each year the Laureate Program in International Law will bring to Melbourne Law School a series of visiting professorial and professional fellows to work with program researchers. The Laureate Program will host an early career workshop with each visiting professorial or professional fellow. At those workshops, Laureate program researchers, Kathleen Fitzpatrick visiting fellows, and selected early career researchers undertaking related projects will present their work in progress, giving them the opportunity to build international networks and gain feedback on their work in progress from leading scholars in the field.

Over the course of her Fellowship, Professor Orford will also act as an ambassador for women in international law research globally, conducting masterclasses and workshops for early career researchers in countries including Colombia, Finland, Russia, Singapore, Sweden, the UK, and the US.

Image courtesy: The University of Melbourne.

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""Professor Adrienne Stone (2016)

Research

Professor Adrienne Stone’s Laureate project aims to address the need to reconcile the tensions between the pursuit of diversity and the promotion of social cohesion. This critical problem becomes increasingly urgent as nations grapple with the challenges of highly diverse multi-cultural societies.

Professor Stone aims to build a team of researchers who draw on the experience of constitutionalism throughout the world to investigate how Constitutions, in their design and in their application, can unify while nurturing the diversity appropriate for a complex, modern society. This project is intended to help governments, judiciaries and the public resolve intense controversies over ideals.

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

Professor Stone will create the Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow and the Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Doctoral Fellow. The Visiting Fellowships will be advertised internationally, and will allow outstanding female researchers to visit Melbourne and work with the project for one to two months each year. The Fellows will be closely integrated into the project and the academic life of the Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies taking part in project events and workshops and participating in work-in-progress seminars.

Professor Stone will also host Early Career Workshops—a series of one-day early career forums to enable outstanding female early career researchers to discuss their work-in-progress with senior scholars attending the project’s workshops. Professor Stone will also provide bursaries to allow two outstanding female scholars to attend the annual Melbourne Institute of Comparative Constitutional Law.

Image courtesy: The University of Melbourne.

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""Professor Sharon Parker (2016)

Research

Professor Sharon Parker plans to study how transformative work design promotes meaningful, healthy, and productive work. The ‘what, how, where, when, and who’ of work is changing: the digital revolution is reconfiguring work processes more rapidly and on a much larger scale than ever before, and the demography of the workforce is profoundly shifting. Work design is a crucial but neglected strategy for optimising health, for unleashing employee talent, and for creating agile and effective organisations.

Ambassadorial and mentoring role

In her ambassadorial and mentoring role, Professor Parker will undertake a variety of activities, such a literature review on women academics’ careers, including influencing factors, the design, pilot, and evaluation of an evidence-based program to provide early career academic women with support, mentoring, skill development, and networking to enhance their research effectiveness. Professor Parker also plans to introduce a second evidence-based program that is targeted at decision makers, leaders, and professional staff who make decisions that affect women’s careers.

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