A computer representation of the gold coated nanoparticles that make up the dispersible electrodes. These are modified with DNA that gives an electrochemical signal. When microRNA binds, the electrochemical signal is switched off. The magnitude in the cha
Original Published Date: 
Monday, August 27, 2018

Full article issued by The University of New South Wales and ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology.

A research team, led by ARC Australian Laureate Fellow Scientia Professor Justin Gooding, based at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology at The University of New South Wales, have discovered a new way to detect ultra-low levels of microRNA in a blood sample which could make diagnosis of cancer and other illnesses quicker and more efficient.

The research team used nanoparticles to latch on to the targeted microRNAs (miRNAs) which enabled them to be easily extracted. One of the main benefits was that it was effective even when the miRNA was in minuscule amounts in the blood sample, allowing earlier detection, and making diagnostic processing faster, simpler and cheaper than current methods. The researchers expect the technology to be available within three years, pending regulatory approvals.

Photo credit: 

A computer representation of the gold coated nanoparticles that make up the dispersible electrodes. These are modified with DNA that gives an electrochemical signal. When microRNA binds, the electrochemical signal is switched off. The magnitude in the change in current is related to the concentration of miRNA. Credit: UNSW Media and Content.