Tiger Shark
Original Published Date: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Full article issued by Griffith University.

New ARC-supported research at Griffith University has revealed a 71 per cent decline in tiger sharks across Queensland’s coastline. 

The researchers who conducted the study say that this decline is surprising, because tiger sharks are one of the most resilient large shark species. Mothers can birth up to 70 pups every three years, which means the population should be resilient to moderate levels of fishing. 

Lead author and Discovery Early Career Research Award (DECRA) recipient Dr Chris Brown from the Australian Rivers Institute says that the decline in tiger sharks, suggests that Australia is not doing enough to protect our unique shark fauna.

Dr Brown says that past studies have implicated multiple types of fishing as causes of tiger shark death. They are caught by commercial fisheries both internationally and in Australian waters, recreational fishing, and the Queensland Shark Control Program, which reports catching 9547 tiger sharks since 1984. Catches in commercial and recreational fisheries are not comprehensively reported.

Photo credit: 

Researchers have revealed a 71 per cent decline in tiger sharks across Queensland’s coastline. Credit: Juan Olifant.