Original Published Date: 
Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Full article issued by The University of Queensland.

New pineapple varieties which grow more reliably and predictably are being developed by ARC-supported researchers at The University of Queensland, in a project that will benefit farmers and industry.

Researchers say that one of the biggest problems affecting pineapple farmers is the premature flowering of the plants, which can lead to a highly erratic pineapple supply, and affects the long-term sustainability of the industry. 

'Our new research will aim to help Australia’s pineapple farming industry, by developing a breed of pineapple resistant to premature flowering,' says Professor Jimmy Botella from UQ’s School of Agriculture and Food Sciences.

Professor Botella believes the research has the potential to significantly improve Australia, and the world’s, pineapple production, with concrete benefits to consumers and industry.

'It will create highly planned and managed production for producers and consumers, and eventually, the ability for pineapple growers to expand their reach into new domestic and international markets.'

'And farmers using these varieties can also expect to increase their production, improving their bottom line.'

'This has the potential to transform the industry,' says Professor Botella.

This project is being supported by an ARC Linkage Projects grant with additional industry support from Australian company Tropical Pines Pty. Ltd.

Photo credit: 

Image: Pxhere (Public Domain).