Experimentation with the multiplexer, showing connection to external systems. The multiplexer does not have any form of supporting substrate.
Original Published Date: 
Monday, May 17, 2021

Full article issued by The University of Adelaide.

ARC-supported researchers from The University of Adelaide and Osaka University (Japan), have worked together to produce a new 'multiplexer' chip made from pure silicon, which promises to be the key to unlocking the next generation of wireless communications: 6G and beyond.

Associate Professor Withawat Withayachumnankul from The University of Adelaide’s School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering says that compact and practical multiplexers have not been developed for the terahertz range, a region of the electromagnetic spectrum that has a far broader bandwidth than that of conventional wireless communications. The new terahertz multiplexers, which are economical to manufacture, will be extremely useful for upcoming ultra-broadband wireless communications.

'In order to control the great spectral bandwidth of terahertz waves, a multiplexer  which is used to split and join signals  is critical for dividing the information into manageable chunks that can be more easily processed and so can be transmitted faster from one device to another,' says Associate Professor Withayachumnankul.

'The shape of the chips we have developed is the key to combining and splitting channels so that more data can be processed more rapidly. Simplicity is its beauty.'

The research is supported by an ARC Discovery Projects grant.

Photo credit: 

Experimentation with the multiplexer, showing connection to external systems. The multiplexer does not have any form of supporting substrate. Credit: Dr Daniel Headland, Osaka University.