Professor Alison Bashford

Administering Organisation: The University of New South Wales 

Fellowship project summary: 

FL200100144: As the planet approaches 8 billion, international debate on population will be ignited again. This project aims to capitalise on Australia’s place in the global South, to lead a distinctively regional perspective on how population policies emerged, and what their present legacies are. Comparing Australia, Japan, India and China, the project intends to analyse highly diverse polities, challenging Europe-outward theses on modernisation and development. This promises a much-improved historical model with which we might better assess the enduring population-environment-economy nexus well into the 21st century. The project should energise a new form of world history writing, boosting Australia's reputation as a leader in big-idea histories.

Australian Research Council funding: $2,801,473.00

About Professor Alison Bashford, FBA, FAHA

Alison Bashford is Professor of History and Director of the New Earth Histories Research Program at The University of New South Wales (UNSW). Her work connects the history of science, global history, and environmental history into new assessments of the modern world, from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Before taking up her Research Chair at UNSW, Alison Bashford was the Vere Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History at the University of Cambridge, Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge, and Trustee of Royal Museums, Greenwich, UK. In 2009-10, she was the Whitlam and Fraser Chair of Australian Studies at Harvard University’s Department of the History of Science. She has researched and taught at The University of Sydney and The Australian National University. Alison Bashford is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Australian Academy of Humanities.

Find out more about Professor Bashford’s research by visiting her profile page on The University of New South Wales website. 

For further information about this funding scheme, please visit the Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme page.

Image credit: The University of New South Wales